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Imperivm
10-03-2010, 08:37 AM
I am soon to become an uncle so I need baby names. We don't know if it's a boy or a girl. Celtic? Anglo-Saxon? But not Norman.



Fire away!
:thumb001:

Lithium
10-03-2010, 08:42 AM
Morgaine or Raven :rolleyes:

Treffie
10-03-2010, 08:46 AM
My sister's kids are called Bethan Rhiannon, Bronwen Eluned and Osian Llyr - that's my contribution :thumb001:

Lábaru
10-03-2010, 10:32 AM
Leire or Leyre, Iria also, although the latter is more doubtful origin Celtic. Do you use this names in your countries?

Debaser11
10-03-2010, 10:46 AM
"John Rambo" for a boy and "Lady Terminator" for a girl.

Detfri
10-03-2010, 11:49 AM
I know two celtic names I like, but they are celtic of French Bretagne.
Anyway: Nolwenn for females, Gwenael for males.

Ps: here you find females Breton names http://www.nomix.it/bretonif.php
and here male breton names:
http://www.nomix.it/bretonim.php

on the same site you find also Irish gaelic names.

Jack B
10-03-2010, 12:25 PM
Saoirse or Aoife for a girl :thumb001:

Murphy
10-03-2010, 12:31 PM
I've just recently became an unclemy self and I also have a new cousin on the way.

My niece's name is Imogen :).

Arne
10-03-2010, 12:33 PM
These are the some chosen Names for a Girl
Melissa,Gwenhyfar (Jennifer),Sabine,Astrid,Heike,Franziska :) ,Frederike,Rike,Elfriede
I also like Charlotte,as well :p

These are the Names for a Boy

Lasse,Frederik,Jens,Ernst,Fridolin,Hendrik

Germanicus
10-03-2010, 02:18 PM
If the baby has your characteristics why not a mediteranean name something like Enrico, or Sophia? :)

Detfri
10-03-2010, 02:35 PM
If the baby has your characteristics why not a mediteranean name something like Enrico, or Sophia? :)

Enrico is germanic... Heinrich ;)

Some Italian names:

Neolatin names:Marco, Antonio, Adriano, Marzio (mean. holy to Mars), Lucrezia, Letizia ("Joy"), Gaia ("happy"), Gaio, Giulio (Julius), Giuliana, Giulia, Emilia, Emilio, Aurelia ("golden"), Ottavia ("the 8thborn"), Novella ("the 9th born), Regina ("queen"), Massimo ("the best/highest"), Quinto ("the 5th born"), Valerio, Valeria, Valeriana, Sabina ("inhabitant of Sabinia"), Marcello, Marcella, Alba (meaning "white"/"light"), Clara, Clarissa, Chiara (all of three meaning "having light hair), Nerissa (having black hair), Claudio/Claudia, Rossella and Rossana("having red hair"), Martina/Martino ("holy to Mars"), Diana ("the goddess of moon and hunting"), Barbara ("foreigner woman"), Silvio/Silvia ("creature of woods"), Margherita ("pearl")... etc. etc.

Æscwyn
10-03-2010, 02:38 PM
Girls

Daisy
Rhiannon
Holly
Edith 'Edie'
Rose
Heather
Anwen
Fern
Gwendolyn
Emma
Éowyn
Audrey
Ellen (usually a form of Greek name 'Helen' but it's also an AS word meaning courage)

Boys

Alfred 'Alfie'
Edward
Rhys
Carl
Ashton
Finn
Edmund
Aled
Winston (Billie Piper called her son this...I think it's cute)
Ingeld
Stan
Taliesin
Sweyn
Bert :D It would make my day to see a little Bert.

The Lawspeaker
10-03-2010, 02:44 PM
For a boy I can offer you my own name "Tristan" but when it will be a girl I have a couple of suggestions: "Siobhan", "Erin" or "Máiréad".

RoyBatty
10-03-2010, 03:29 PM
"John Rambo" for a boy and "Lady Terminator" for a girl.

Lady Terminator is a fairly decent Indonesian B-Movie. Recommended. :D

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0095483/

Liffrea
10-03-2010, 03:57 PM
I was an uncle when I was about ten (my older brother is over twenty years older than me).

I think it about time some Old English names that survived the conquest and were popular up until the 60’s were revitalised and end the chavdom that has given us a myriad of inter changeable Chantel’s and Jason’s.

Edward
Edgar
Edmund
Harold
Alfred
Edith
Ethel

Probably wouldn’t get away with some of the more archaic names but I like Leofwine and Leofric.

Murphy
10-03-2010, 04:07 PM
Hm, boys names I like would be..

Peter, Michael, Joseph, Patrick, John, Francis, Robert, Malcolm, James, Charles and Darren amongst others.

Girls names.. Mary, Annemarie, Kerryanne, Kerry, Bernadette, Isobel, Teresa, Catherine, Catriona, Fiona, Margaret and Samantha amongst others.

Sahson
10-03-2010, 04:49 PM
Girl Anglo-Saxon

Arleigh (Meadow of the hare)
Ashley
Blythe (cheerful)
Ethal
Hollis

Boy

Aidan

hereward
10-03-2010, 05:18 PM
Boy: Astley, Wade, Edward, Weland/Wayland, Alfred, Edmund, Bradley, Wendell.

Girl: I'll leave that to my wife.





I was an uncle when I was about ten (my older brother is over twenty years older than me).

I think it about time some Old English names that survived the conquest and were popular up until the 60’s were revitalised and end the chavdom that has given us a myriad of inter changeable Chantel’s and Jason’s.

Edward
Edgar
Edmund
Harold
Alfred
Edith
Ethel

Probably wouldn’t get away with some of the more archaic names but I like Leofwine and Leofric.

All depends on the strenghth of the parents. I would like to see such names used again, Siward, Hereward, Athelstan etc. Funny how the English will laugh at such names but would gladly call their children Reece, Cameron, Kieth, Sean, Aiden, Connor,Ryan:rolleyes2: etc

Comte Arnau
10-03-2010, 05:33 PM
Anwen, Darina, Eireen, Gwyneira or Muriel.

Bloodeagle
10-03-2010, 06:35 PM
I like the names Garrett, Hayden, Renton, Winston, Richard, Eric, and Edward for the boys.

For the girls I like Lyra, Golde, Willow, Cheryl, and Autumn. :)

la bombe
10-03-2010, 06:55 PM
Out of all the girl names posted so far I like Rhiannon, Saoirse, Fiona and Catriona.

I named my little brother and I chose Evan. I also like Ian.

Pallantides
10-03-2010, 07:00 PM
Nezahualcoyotl if it's a boy and Quetzalxochitl if it's a girl.

la bombe
10-03-2010, 07:09 PM
I've been looking up Irish names and I really like Saorla, which apparently means "noble queen" and for boys, Tadhg and Kieran.

Äike
10-03-2010, 07:11 PM
For a boy... Karl, Erlend and Ingvar, Ivar and Sven are nice names.

For a girl... Linda, Katrin, Ingrid, Karin, Signe and Hanna are nice names.

These names are common in Estonia and wouldn't sound weird in most European countries.

Pallantides
10-03-2010, 07:13 PM
If it's a boy name him Beorn(the old english version of my first name)

Loddfafner
10-03-2010, 07:24 PM
Keep it simple. Be considerate of the teachers who have to figure out how to pronounce the name.

esaima
10-03-2010, 08:05 PM
For a boy... Erlend and Ingvar are nice names.
These names are common in Estonia

They aren´t so common.Swedish names, why should they be very common in here.
Because of historical tradition, German names are indeed very common among Estonians.Swedish names are less common although some of them-like Ivar and Sven have been popular in different periods.But generally-Estonian name tradition is not rigid and one can call his baby Carlos (Mexican soap operas, you know), Kevin or Keanu (Hollywood products) as well.
I respect different ethnicities and their names. I respect if someone is Vladimir, someone is Bjoern and someone is Giustino, but I personally think (too) foreign sounding names aren´t the best taste.

Osweo
10-03-2010, 10:26 PM
Why the fuck an Englishman would allow his heir to bear an Irish name when he had no known connection with that island is beyond me.

My own thick stupid lazy pig-ignorant (fully-English) cousin called his kid 'Conner' (sic). Fucking thick bastard. Shun't be allowed to ave bleedin kids... :rage:tsk:

Ahem.

:suomut: The moral is, don't call your kid a name that they haven't some sort of RIGHT to.

And Christ.... Eowynn?! Avoid popular fictional characters. Even if they have authentic names, you'll still be mocked for doing so. :tsk:

Welsh names.... :strokebeard: I'm of two minds on this one. There's not an Englishman alive who won't have British ancestors from 1500 years ago, but well... That's quite a long time!

PROPER ENGLISH NAMES:
Sadly, I think AEthelbeorht is pushing it, ever so slightly.

There are not a few names that have decent modernish forms that you can get away with easily enough though (including Anglo-Scandinavian ones). Edward, Eric, Elliot, Mildred, Alfred, Carl, Ethel, Gytha, Audrey, Abb, Oswald, Bernard, Edmund, Howard, Rolf, Edith, Hilda, Harriet, Cuthbert, Wilfred, Edwin, Osborn, Arnold...

A lot of the more obscure ones have survived as surnames, which should be noted, and can provide a more 'familiar' sounding form to modern ears than the original. If you like Leofric, you can call your kid Leveridge, Leofwine > Lewin. Torfinnr > Turpin, Eilafr > Ayliffe, Aethelfrith > Alfrey, Hwitraed > Whittred...

The tendency to give placenames as first-names puzzles me. Under this heading go Astley, Ashley, Ainsley, Ashton, Bradley, Shelley, Chelsea.... ?!? :confused: I mean, if you're from there, or have an ancestor with that surname, okay... but otherwise... ! :tsk:

There's tons of names to choose from. Here's a fairly exhaustive list;
http://eagle.cch.kcl.ac.uk:8080/pase/persons/index.html
(Click on the letters at the top, and you'll get all names that begin with them)

I'd suggest going through it, eliminating the absurd ones that you'll never get away with, and presenting your sibling with a list of some to bear in mind.

And PLEASE check back with us, to prevent horrendous potential embarrassment! :rotfl:

I reckon there's a few more obscure ones that could be brought back without too much fuss; Aldred, Ailfrith, Edwulf, Waldeve, Kenward, Kilvert, Baldrick ;), Oswy... :wink:D

Roguegunner
10-03-2010, 10:28 PM
Adolf is a great name!

Peasant
10-03-2010, 10:34 PM
Heinrich sounds better. Or Wilhelm.

Treffie
10-03-2010, 10:41 PM
Gwyneira

Literally translated as Snow White :p

My friend's mother's name is Gwlithyn - dewdrop

Osweo
10-03-2010, 10:49 PM
Adolf is a great name!

Not for Englishmen. :rolleyes:

OUR form of the same name was AEthelwulf, though the related Eadwulf sounds more like it.

I actually rather like the latter. :p Its more recent form was spelt Edulf.

I'm interested in 'modernising' the old names, by the way. We say 'tree' and 'town' now, instead of treow and tun, so why should we use only the older forms of our old names? They can be subjected to the same development that our other linguistic heritage has.

Peasant
10-03-2010, 10:58 PM
From Anglo-Saxon names I like these, maybe best as middle names.

Denby Anglo-Saxon Male From the Danish settlement.
Brigantia Anglo-Saxon Female Yorkshire goddess.
Brogan Anglo-Saxon Male Terror.
Bron Anglo-Saxon Male Brown or dark.
Diera Anglo-Saxon Female From Diera.
Irwin Anglo-Saxon Male Sea lover.
Isen Anglo-Saxon Male Iron.

Although Denby, no connection to that place. And I've just realised I am thinking of Danby.. I guess its name came from the same place?

Æscwyn
10-03-2010, 11:13 PM
Reviving proper Old English names is nice in theory... but the child is going to be living in the real 21st century world and will have to deal with the very real likelihood of teasing if they have what appears to be an 'unusual name' among their playground peers. Apart from a limited selection, OE names have been out of vogue in England since the Norman conquest - so they will seem strange and archaic to the average modern Englishman. Unless there is a sudden surge of little Eadwulfs and Godrics I do not see that changing.

That said, I recently saw a birth announcement for a baby Wulfstan in The Times newspaper. :thumb001:

Æscwyn
10-03-2010, 11:20 PM
From Anglo-Saxon names I like these, maybe best as middle names.

Brigantia was a pre-Saxon goddess and Brogan is Irish. I wouldn't trust a lot of the baby name sites out there, they literally make up meanings and do no etymological research whatsoever. I find www.behindthename.com (http://www.behindthename.com) to be the most accurate. They properly research the names. :)

hereward
10-03-2010, 11:23 PM
Why the fuck an Englishman would allow his heir to bear an Irish name when he had no known connection with that island is beyond me.

My own thick stupid lazy pig-ignorant (fully-English) cousin called his kid 'Conner' (sic). Fucking thick bastard. Shun't be allowed to ave bleedin kids... :rage:tsk:

Ahem.

:suomut: The moral is, don't call your kid a name that they haven't some sort of RIGHT to.

Amongst the welfare bred in London, Irish and Welsh names (Scottish first names/Surnames to a lesser extent) are common place. Like the rest of the population, they have ancestry from those nations, yet I doubt this is the reason for the prolific use of the names. :confused3:



The tendency to give placenames as first-names puzzles me. Under this heading go Astley, Ashley, Ainsley, Ashton, Bradley, Shelley, Chelsea.... ?!? :confused: I mean, if you're from there, or have an ancestor with that surname, okay... but otherwise... ! :tsk:

Regarding Astley; as mentioned before, it has been in use on my Mums paternal side for nigh on 300 years. The bearers are from your neck of the woods, Fallowfield and Withington.


There's tons of names to choose from. Here's a fairly exhaustive list;
http://eagle.cch.kcl.ac.uk:8080/pase/persons/index.html
(Click on the letters at the top, and you'll get all names that begin with them)

Thanks for the link.

la bombe
10-03-2010, 11:31 PM
Reviving proper Old English names is nice in theory... but the child is going to be living in the real 21st century world and will have to deal with the very real likelihood of teasing if they have what appears to be an 'unusual name' among their playground peers. Apart from a limited selection, OE names have been out of vogue in England since the Norman conquest - so they will seem strange and archaic to the average modern Englishman. Unless there is a sudden surge of little Eadwulfs and Godrics I do not see that changing.

That said, I recently saw a birth announcement for a baby Wulfstan in The Times newspaper. :thumb001:

None of those names are any weirder than the made-up crap people concoct nowadays.

Guapo
10-03-2010, 11:36 PM
Edward or Edwarda

Megrez
10-03-2010, 11:52 PM
Is there any Anglo-saxon form for the Portuguese Ildefonso, which derives from the Gothic Hildefuns (http://www.20000-names.com/origin_of_baby_names/etymology_H_male/meaning_of_the_name_hildefuns.htm)?

hereward
10-03-2010, 11:55 PM
Reviving proper Old English names is nice in theory... but the child is going to be living in the real 21st century world and will have to deal with the very real likelihood of teasing if they have what appears to be an 'unusual name' among their playground peers.

Well, every Indian/Paki/Bangladeshi who has ever been through the education system here has been ‘teased’; it has not affected the choice of names for their offspring.


Apart from a limited selection, OE names have been out of vogue in England since the Norman conquest - so they will seem strange and archaic to the average modern Englishman. Unless there is a sudden surge of little Eadwulfs and Godrics I do not see that changing.

You should take a visit to Chichester Cathedral, where there are portraits of Bishops up unto the 1500's, Old English names are plentiful right up until the end, if I recall.

Æscwyn
10-04-2010, 12:27 AM
Well, every Indian/Paki/Bangladeshi who has ever been through the education system here has been ‘teased’; it has not affected the choice of names for their offspring.

True enough but they have the advantage of being able to cry racism in such instances and the teasing doesn't usually come from within their own communities. I went to school with a boy called Edwin, which is a perfectly reasonable and unremarkable OE name, and he got teased for it. Just makes me mindful of what an Edgar, Leofric or Aethelstan could experience. Children can be cruel.


You should take a visit to Chichester Cathedral, where there are portraits of Bishops up unto the 1500's, Old English names are plentiful right up until the end, if I recall.Can you remember any examples of these? I did a quick lookup of some Bishops of Chichester on Wikipedia and found only post-Saxon Medieval Germanic names (Godfrey, Richard, Gilbert etc).

Osweo
10-04-2010, 12:38 AM
From Anglo-Saxon names I like these, maybe best as middle names.
Middle names are interesting. You can get away with almost anything there. And if you feel, you can always start using them, even if you were a bit nervous of them at first. :)

Denby Anglo-Saxon Male From the Danish settlement.
Where's the 'twitching eye' smilie? ;)
Denby... Why not Ingleborough?! :tongue:rolleyes:

Brigantia Anglo-Saxon Female Yorkshire goddess.
Our Devon lass is right that this one isn't 'English' as such, but the name does have a history in England from times after the Norse came here from Ireland. The form they used was that which gave us our modern Bride. Bridie's actually a pretty name, I think. And as you say, there are links with specific parts of England, which is nice. There are tons of Bridekirks up in the North West, and a few Bridestowes in more Saxon parts. :) Brigid is an Irish form, of course.

Brogan Anglo-Saxon Male Terror.
Bron Anglo-Saxon Male Brown or dark.
Isen Anglo-Saxon Male Iron.
:rage They're not NAMES!!!!!!!!!!! :mad:

Diera Anglo-Saxon Female From Diera.
East Yorkshire was called variously DEIra, Dere, Deur...

The old form of modern 'dear' was diere

Irwin Anglo-Saxon Male Sea lover.
.. Who says? :confused:

Reviving proper Old English names is nice in theory... but the child is going to be living in the real 21st century world and will have to deal with the very real likelihood of teasing if they have what appears to be an 'unusual name' among their playground peers.
Abdul
Amir
Bogdan
Cheung
Conchobhor
Dawood
Edwulf
Farooq
Gwenhwyfar
Hasan
Jamal
Kashif
Keiyrann
Latifaaaah
Mbwanaka
Mohammad
Mohammad
Mohammad
Mohammad
Puja
Saoirse
Tariq
Wakim

- I don't think it'll be a problem... :ohwell:

That said, I recently saw a birth announcement for a baby Wulfstan in The Times newspaper. :thumb001:
:clap:

Edward or Edwarda
God... I hate female names made by sticking an 'A' on the end of a male one!!! :rage
The worst I've seen; Nigella, Edwina, Donalda...
'-A' in Old English was more often seen on male names, actually.
English women's names most often ended -burh, -flaed, -thryth, -wynn.

Here's a nice list of women;


Acha 1 - e/m vii (Sister of Edwin 2 of Northumbria; king Oswald 1's mother)
Adola 1 - e viii (Abbess)
Aldgyth 1 - (Benefactor of the New Minster Winchester)
Aloburg 1 - e ix (Witness to Kentish charter, c.827)
Alta 1 - l viii (Wife of Wiferd 1, fl. 781x796)
Ansith 1 - e/m viii (Wife of Wihtred 2; owner of land in Middx.)
Ase 1 - m x-e xi (Sister of Romsey Abbey (c.967x1031))
Aswig 1 - l x (Mother of Ufi 2, late 10thC)
Balthild 1 - m/l vii (St.; Anglo-Saxon Queen of the Franks, d. c.680)
Bave 1 - (Wife of Æthelweard pada and benefactor of the New Minster Winchester)
Beage 1 - e/m viii (Daughter of Leppa 1, comes, 718x745; holder of land in Hwiccian region)
Bebbe 1 - (Queen after whose name the city of Bamburgh was named)
Begu 1 - e/m vii (Nun at Hackness)
Beonne 1 - e ix (Witness at Clofesho, 827)
Beorhtgifu 1 - l x (Noble lady, fl. 968; land-owner)
Beorhtwaru 2 - l x-e xi (Slave at Offley, Herts., fl. 990x1001)
Beorhtwynn 2 - m x (Mother of Wynnflæd 1, ?mid 10thC)
Beornflæd 1 - l x-e xi (Slave, 990x1001)
Beorngyth 1 - l vii (Abbess [of / near Bath?], c.680)
Beornwynn 1 - e ix (Sister to Ælfflæd 7 and Walenburg 1, fl. 833)
Bertana 1 - l vii (Abbess of Bath, fl. 675)
Berthgyth 1 - m viii (Sister of Baltheard 1)
Bliththryth 1 - l vii-e viii (Pippin 1 II's wife)
Bregoswith 1 - l vi-e vii (Mother of Hild 1)
Brunhild 1 - l vi-e vii (Queen of the Franks, d.613)
Bucga 1 - l vii-e viii (Nun, fl. 675x704; daughter of Dunne 1)
Bugga 1 - l vii (Daughter of King Centwine 1)
Burga 1 - e x-l xi (Mother of Ælfwaru 1)
Burghild 1 - e ix (Sister of King Cenwulf 3)
Burginda 1 - m vii-l viii? (Letter-writer)
Byrhflæd 1 - l x-e xi (Sister of Romsey Abbey (c.967x1031))
Byrhtgifu 1 - l x-e xi (Sister of Romsey Abbey (c.967x1031))
Byrnflæd 1 - (Benefactor of the New Minster Winchester)
Bægia 1 - e viii (Nun, fl. c.727; owner of land in Gloucs.)
Bægswyth 1 - e ix (Witness at Clofesho, 825)
Cenburg 1 - m viii (Abbess)
Censwith 1 - l vii (Nurse of Cuthbert 1; Cwenswith)
Cenwynn 1 - e x (Name entered in the Liber Vitae of St Gallen, 929)
Ceolburg 1 - e ix (Mother of Æthelric 8 and Abbess of Berkeley, d. 805.)
Ceolflæd 2 - m x-e xi (Mother of Æthelweard 32, fl. 990x1016)
Ceolswith 1 - l vii-e viii (Abbess, fl. 699-705x726; Cilla, sister of Hæha 1)
Ceolthryth 1 - e x-l xi (Woman known to Wynnflæd 1)
Ceolwynn 1 - l ix-e x (Owner of land in Kent, fl. 900)
Cneuburg 1 - m viii (Abbess)
Crawe 1 - m x-e xi (Kinswoman of Ælfflæd 13, fl. 962x991-1000x1002)
Culfre 1 - l ix-e x ([?Nun of Much Wenlock], fl. 901)
Cuniburg 1 - (Abbess)
Cuthburg 2 - l vii-m viii? (Queen seen in hell in a vision)
Cuthswith 1 - l vii (Abbess, fl. 693)
Cuthswith 3 - e viii (Owner of land in Warwicks., 704x709)
Cwenburg 1 - (Wife of Milfrith 1)
Cwengyth 1 - l vii (Owner of land near London, late 7thC)
Cwenthryth 1 - e ix (Abbess of Minster-in-Thanet, fl. 824-825; daughter of King Cenwulf 3 of Mercia)
Cyneburg 1 - m/l vii (Daughter of Penda 1; wife of Ealhfrith 1)
Cynegyth 2 - l viii (Queen of the Mercians, fl. 799; wife of Cenwulf 3)
Cynehild 1 - m viii (Correspondent of Boniface 5)
Cyneleofu 1 - l x-e xi (Slave at Offley, Herts., fl. 990x1001)
Cynelufu 1 - e x-l xi (Recipient in Wynnflæd 1's will)
Cyneswith 1 - m/l vii (Sister of King Wulfhere 1 of Mercia)
Cynethryth 6 - e/m x (Mother of Dunstan 1)
Cynewise 1 - e/m vii (Queen [of Mercia; Penda 1's wife], fl. 655)
Cynewynn 1 - l x (Mother of Anonymous 1002, late 10thC)
Cynric 4 - m viii (West Saxon nobleman in spurious charter, '749')
Deorswith 1 - e x (Owner of land in Wilts., fl. 901; ?daughter of Deormod 5)
Duhchae 1 - l viii (Nun)
Dunne 1 - e viii (Nun; owner of land in Gloucs.)
Eadburg 8 - m x (Sister of King Æthelstan 18, fl. 939)
Eadflæd 5 - l x (Holder of land in Warwicks., late 10thC)
Eadgifu 14 - l x-e xi (Sister of Romsey Abbey (c.967x1031))
Eadgyth 8 - l x-e xi (Sister of Romsey Abbey (c.967x1031))
Eadhild 1 - e/m x (Daughter of Edward 2 and wife of Hugh 1 the Great)
Eadleofu 1 -m/l x (Wife of Oswulf 20, fl. 969; sister-in-law of Bishop Oswald 8)
Eadmær 9 - (Holder of land in ?Worcs., late 10th / early 11thC; cf. Eadmær 8)
Eadswith 1 - l vii (Hildmer 1's wife, named in marginal note of Bede's Life of Cuthbert)
Eadwulfu 1 - e/m x (Nun, fl. 939; owner of land in Berks.)
Eadwynn 1 - e x-l xi (Slave at Charlton)
Eafe 1 - l vii (Queen of Æthelwalh 1 of Sussex)
Ealdgyth 1 - l x-e xi (Wife of Morcar 2, fl. 1002x1004)
Ealfthryth 1 - e/m ix (Daughter of Oswulf 4)
Ealhburg 1 - m ix (Owner of land in Kent, fl. 850; probably wife to Ealdred 19)
Ealhflæd 1 - m vii (Wife of Peada 1 of Mercia; daughter of King Oswiu 1 of Northumbria)
Ealhswaru 1 - e x (Wife of Alfred 29, fl. 918x924)
Ealhswith 1 - l ix-e x (Wife of Alfred 8 the Great, d. 902)
Ealhthryth 1 - l viii-l ix (Daughter of Ealdorman Alfred 18 and Wærburg 3, fl. 871x899)
Ealhwaru 1 - m ix (Witness to Kentish charter, 850)
Ealhwynn 1 - m ix (Daughter of Ealhhere 9, fl. 850)
Eanburg 1 - l viii (Abbess, fl. 780; kinswoman of Offa 7)
Eanflæd 1 - e vii (Queen of Oswiu 1; daughter of Edwin 2, 626-post685)
Eangyth 1 - e viii (Abbess, fl. 719x722)
Eanswith 2 - e ix (Holder of land in Worcs., c. 814)
Eawynn 1 - m x (A religious woman, fl. 946; owner of land in Essex)
Ecgburg 3 - e ix (Witness at Clofesho, 825)
Echitrad 1 - l ix (Luantic woman suffering from hemorrhoids)
Edlu 1 - m viii (Nun, fl. 729xc.744)
Emma 1 - e vii (Queen of Eadbald 2 of Kent)
Eoleoba 1 - m viii (Leoba 1's disciple)
Eorcengota 1 - m/l vii (Daughter of King Eorcenberht 1 of Kent)
Eormenburg 1 - l vii (Abbess, fl. 699; second wife of Ecgfrith 4 of Northumbria)
Eormenhild 1 - l vii-e viii (Abbess; daughter of Seaxburg 1)
Eormenthryth 1 - m x (Granddaughter of King Alfred 8; daughter of Ælfthryth 5 and Baldwin 2)
Etan 1 - e/m viii (Kinswoman of Abbot Ealdhun 2, fl. 729xc.744)
Faghild 1 - (Name inscribed in runic script in the Catacomb of Sts Marcellinus and Peter (via Labicana, Rome))
Folcburg 1 - l vii (Woman connected with Bath, fl. 680)
Frigyth 1 - m vii (Nun at Hackness)
Frithugyth 1 - l vii-m ix (Queen of the West Saxons, fl. 737)
Gerburg 1 - e x-l xi (Slave at Chinnock, Somerset)
Gisla 1 - l viii-e ix (Abbess and sister of Charlemagne 1)
Gode 1 - l x-e xi (Elder daughter of Wulfwaru 3, fl. 984x1016)
Godgifu 1 - l x-e xi (Sister of Romsey Abbey (c.967x1031))
Godhyse 1 - m x (Holder of land in Worcs., fl. 966)
Godwif 1 - l x (Daughter of Leofrun 5, fl. 990x1001)
Gænburg 1 - e/m ix (Wife of Æthelnoth 12, fl. 805x832)
Hadamout 1 - e/m ix (Dedicatee of Rudolf's Life of Leoba)
Heahberht 9 - e ix (Ealdorman, fl. 807)
Heahburg 1 - e viii (Daughter of Eangyth 1; aka Bugga)
Heanflæd 1 - l x-e xi (Abbess of Wherwell, fl. 1002)
Heiu 1 - m vii (Founder of the monastery at Hartlepool, fl. 640s)
Hereburg 1 - e viii (Abbess of Watton, early 8thC)
Herelufu 1 - l x (Abbess of Shaftesbury, d. 982)
Hereswith 1 - e/m vii (Hild 1's sister)
Hidburg 1 - l vii-e viii (Nun, fl. 675x710)
Hild 1 - e/m vii (Saint; abbess of Whitby, 614-680)
Hildeburg 1 - m x-e xi (Sister of Romsey Abbey (c.967x1031))
Hildelith 1 - e viii (Abbess of Barking)
Hrothwaru 1 - l vii-l viii (Abbess, grand-daughter of Dunne 1, fl. 736x737)
Hundruda 1 - m viii (Nun at court of Offa 7, king of the Mercians)
Hungifu 1 - l x (Owner of land latterly belonging to Peterborough)
Hungyth 1 - l viii (Owner of land in Oxon, fl. 874x879)
Hygeburg 1 - l viii (Nun of Heidenheim and author)
Irmigi 1 - m/l viii (Nun, fl. 760x778)
Isenburg 1 - (Benefactor of the New Minster Winchester)
Kyre 1 - (Benefactor of the New Minster Winchester)
Leoba 1 - e/m viii (Abbess of Bischofsheim)
Leobgyda 1 - (Probably same as Leoba 1, whose life was written by Rudolf of Fulda)
Leofcwen 1 - e x-l xi (Owner of land in Suffolk, 11thC)
Leofdæge 1 - e xi (Wife of Healthegen 1, fl. 1026)
Leofflæd 1 - l x (Holder of land in Worcs., fl. 991)
Leofgifu 1 - (Wife of Ceolsige 1)
Leofgifu 2 - e xi (Owner of land in Essex and Suffolk, fl. 1035x1044)
Leofgyth 1 - (Wife of Ælfgar 19 and benefactor of the New Minster Winchester)
Leofrun 6 - l x-e xi (Slave of Æthelgifu 15, fl. 990x1001)
Leofsidu 1 - l x-e xi (Sister of Romsey Abbey (c.967x1031))
Leofwaru 2 - e xi (Daughter of Leofflæd 5, fl. 1017x1035)
Leofwynn 4 - e xi-l xi (Wife of Thurcytel 10, 11thC; owner of land in Norfolk)
Lewknor 1 - l x (Abbess, fl. 990x992)
Licgeard 1 - (Benefactor of the New Minster Winchester)
Lufu 2 - e x (Slave? at Ebbesborne, fl. 902)
Luha 1 - l ix-e x (Slave? at Ebbesborne, fl. 902)
Mildburg 1 - e viii (Abbess of Much Wenlock, d.715)
Mildrith 1 - l vii-m viii (Abbess of Minster-in-Thanet, fl. 716-733)
Mærwynn 1 - l x (Abbess of Romsey, fl. 967x975)
Nana 1 - e/m viii (Leoba 1's disciple)
Nerienda 1 - l vii (Abbess [in Kent], fl. 699)
Nothgyth 1 - l vii (Sister of King Nothhelm 1, fl. 692)
Noththry 1 - m/l viii (Nun; kinswoman of Bishop Eardwulf 3 of Rochester and King Eardwulf 2)
Osburg 2 - m viii (Mother of Alfred 8 and daughter of Oslac 2)
Osgifu 1 - l viii (Wife of Alhred 1)
Osthryth 1 - l vii (Queen of Mercia; wife of King Æthelred 2)
Oswaru 1 - l x-e xi (Sister of Romsey Abbey (c.967x1031))
Oswynn 1 - m x (Devotee of St Edmund 6 )
Pega 1 - l vii-e viii (Sister of St Guthlac 2)
Quen 1 - m x (Matrona of King Edgar 11, fl. 959)
Ringwaru 1 - m xi (Owner of land in Norfolk, mid 11thC)
Seaxburg 1 - m/l vii (Queen of Kent; abbess of Ely, c.679-c.700)
Seleburg 1 - e ix (Abbess, fl. 811)
Selethryth 1 - l viii-e ix (Abbess of Lyminge, fl. 785-805)
Sifflæd 1 - (Owner of land in Norfolk, 9th / 10thC)
Sigeburga 1 - m viii (Abbess, fl. 761x764-763/4)
Sigegyth 1 - l vii-e viii (Nun and recipient of letter from Aldhelm 3)
Sigethryth 1 - m ix (?Wife of Lulla 9; owner of land near Canterbury, fl. ?844)
Sigewaru 1 - (Anglo-Scandinavian person entered in the Reichenau Liber Vitae)
Suitha 1 - m/l viii (Abbess)
Swete 1 - (Benefactor of the New Minster Winchester)
Sæthryth 1 - m vii (Stepdaughter of King Anna 1; nun in Frankia, fl. c.640)
Tecla 1 - e/m viii (Leoba 1's disciple)
Tette 1 - l vii (Mother of St Guthlac 2)
Thecla 1 - l vii-e viii (Nun; correspondent of Aldhelm 3)
Thurwif 1 - m x (Slave [at ?Yaxley], mid 10thC)
Tibba 1 - (Saint translated from Ryhall to Peterborough by Ælfsige 84)
Tidburg 2 - l viii (Wife of Wærbald 2, fl. 770)
Tinti 1 - ()
Torhtgyth 1 - l vii (Sister at Barking monastery)
Tuce 1 - l x (Mother of Clac 4, late 10thC)
Verca 1 - l vii (Abbess in the Prose life of Cuthbert)
Wale 1 - e viii (Abbess)
Walenburg 1 - e/m ix (Sister to Beornwynn 1 and Ælfflæd 7, fl. 833)
Weahtræth 1 - m ix (Probably wife of Oswig 2, fl. 858x866)
Welwynn 1 - l x (Owner of land in Herts., fl. 990x1001)
Wethburg 1 - m viii (Traveller to Rome, fl. 738)
Wiala 1 - (Queen seen in hell, d. before 757)
Wigburg 1 - l ix-e x ([?Nun of Much Wenlock], fl. 901)
Wigswith 1 - l ix (Witness to Worcs. charter, 897)
Wihtburg 1 - m/l vii (Saint [sister of St Æthelthryth 2 of Ely])
Wihtflæd 1 - m/l x (Holder of land in Worcs., fl. 966)
Williswind 1 - l viii (Nun healed by St Leoba 1)
Willnoth 1 - l vii-e viii (Abbess, fl. 699x716)
Wilswith 1 - m x-e xi (Sister of Romsey Abbey (c.967x1031))
Wiswith 1 - m x (Woman known to Ælfgar 9)
Withburg 1 - m vii (Sister of Æthelthryth 2)
Wulfflæd 1 - e x-l xi (Slave; servant of Æthelflæd 7and Eadgifu 5)
Wulfgifu 4 - e xi (Matrona, fl. 1003x1016; holder of land in Worcs.)
Wulfgyth 3 - l ix ([?Nun of Much Wenlock], fl. 901)
Wulfhild 1 - e x (Person whose name was entered in the Liber Vitae of St Gallen in 929)
Wulfrun 10 - l x-e xi (Slave at Standon, Herts., fl. 990x1001)
Wulfswith 2 - m x (Ancilla Dei, fl. 939; owner of land in Wilts.)
Wulfthryth 2 - l ix (Queen of the West Saxons; wife of King Æthelred 15, fl. 868)
Wulfwaru 1 - m/l x (Slave, mid/late 10thC)
Wulfwynn 2 - (Wife of Byrhtwald 2 and benefactor of the New Minster Winchester)
Wynnflæd 6 - l x-e xi (Mother of Eadric 12; before 1014)
Wynngifu 1 - e x-e xi (Sister of Romsey Abbey (c.967x1031))
Wynnthryth 1 - (Person whose name was entered in the Liber Vitae of St Gallen in 929)
Wærburg 1 - l vii-e viii (King Wihtred 1 of Kent's queen, fl. 699x716)
Ymme 1 - l x (Slave at Westwick, Herts., late 10thC)
Æbbe 4 - e/m viii (Mother of Leoba 1)
Æffe 2 - l x (Holder of land in Beds., fl. ?986)
Ælfflæd 3 - l vii-e viii (Daughter of Oswiu 1 who died in the monasterium of Hild 1)
Ælfgifu 19 - l x-e xi (Æthelgifu 15's neice, fl. 990x1001)
Ælfgyth 1 - e ix (Witness to Mercian/Kentish charter, c.827)
Ælfhild 1 - e x-l xi (Wife of Ælfwald 41 and benefactor of the New Minster
Ælfleof 1 - l x-e xi (Sister of Romsey Abbey (c.967x1031))
Ælfrun 1 - m x-e xi (Sister of Romsey Abbey (c.967x1031))
Ælfswith 11 - l x-e xi (Slave at Clifton, Beds., fl. 990x1001)
Ælfthryth 9 - l x (Daughter of Wulfrun 8, fl. 994)
Ælfwaru 5 - l x-e xi (Daughter of Wulfric 55; slave, fl. 990x1001)
Ælfwenna 1 - l x (Younger daughter of Æthelstan Mannessune, fl. ?986)
Ælfwynn 4 - e/m xi (Daughter of Leofflæd 5, fl. 1017x1035)
Æscburg 1 - m viii (Abbess, fl. 737)
Æscwynn 1 - l x (Mother of Ælfric 80, fl. 980x987)
Æthelburg 1 - e vii (Daughter of Æthelberht 3 I of Kent; queen of the Northumbrians)
Æthelflæd 24 - e/m xi (Wife of Toki, fl. 1020x1038)
Æthelgifu 5 - e x-l xi (Seamstress)
Æthelgyth 2 - e x-l xi (Slave at Coleshill, Berks.)
Æthelhild 6 - l x (Mother of Ælfwine 39, fl. 975x978)
Æthelswith 6 - e/m xi (Daughter of Leofflæd 5, fl. 1017x1035)
Æthelthida 1 - l viii (Abbess and mother of Æthelred 7, king of the Northumbrians)
Æthelthryth 1 - m vii (Daughter of King Edwin 2 of Northumbria, d. after 627)
Æthelwynn 4 - l x-e xi (Slave, fl. 990x1001)
Ætte 1 - l vii-e viii (Witness to Kentish charter, fl. 699x716)
Æulf 1 - m x (Owner of land known to Ælfgar 9, before 946x951)


... Sexburgh and Faghild definitely need resurrecting. ;)

hereward
10-04-2010, 12:43 AM
I have just looked it up on wiki too, it is not what I remember. Maybe I am confused, but I certainly do not remember those names. I mentioned Chichester as I was surprised to see how long the names lasted after the conquest. I was only there in May 09.

Æscwyn
10-04-2010, 12:52 AM
Osweo, continuing from your idea of updating the form of Old English names, what do you think of Ashwin? :cool:

Additionally, I can think of...

Cyneburh - Kimber
Aethelgyth - Ailith
Ealhswiþ - Elswyth

Megrez
10-04-2010, 01:05 AM
Just makes me mindful of what an Edgar, Leofric or Aethelstan could experience. Children can be cruel.
Edgar is a perfectly normal name here in Brazil :eusa_eh:

Osweo
10-04-2010, 01:11 AM
Is there any Anglo-saxon form for the Portuguese Ildefonso, which derives from the Gothic Hildefuns (http://www.20000-names.com/origin_of_baby_names/etymology_H_male/meaning_of_the_name_hildefuns.htm)?
Interesting....
Hildefuns - Battle ready.
We have Hild in lots of names, but I've never seen anything like '-funs' as an ending. Perhaps it's unique to Gothic?

I looked in a Gothic dictionary, and it gives an Old English fus as a cognate, a word I've never encountered.
http://books.google.com.br/books?id=39UUAAAAIAAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=snippet&q=funs&f=false

fús [] adj striving forward, eager for, ready for, inclined to, willing, prompt; expectant, brave, noble; ready to depart, dying
fúsléoð2 [] n (-es/-) death-song, dirge
fúslic [] adj ready to start; excellent; adv ~líce readily, gladly
fúsnes [] f (-se/-sa) quickness
So... *Hildfus! :p
The same source derives Alfonso not from Hildefuns, but from Athalafuns, of which a hypothetic English reflex would be *AEthelfus.
:)

OE names have been out of vogue in England since the Norman conquest
I should have said; that's a widely held misconception. The old names lingered on for centuries. The problem is, historical actors of the period were Norman or socially mobile English with Normanising trends in naming. I've been visiting the local churches lately, and just about any Crusader effigy is ROGER de x-ton, with his wife as ALICE. :D Roger and Alice's husbandmen will have been the same old Doddas and Bubbas as ever they were.

True enough but they have the advantage of being able to cry racism in such instances and the teasing doesn't usually come from within their own communities. I went to school with a boy called Edwin, which is a perfectly reasonable and unremarkable OE name, and he got teased for it. Just makes me mindful of what an Edgar, Leofric or Aethelstan could experience. Children can be cruel.
M89c3hWx3RQ
:thumb001:

Æscwyn
10-04-2010, 01:11 AM
Edgar is a perfectly common name here in Brazil :eusa_eh:Yeah, I noticed that about Mexico too when I went there. There were loads of Edgars, Alfredos and Eduardos.

Funny how our names have survived and thrived in Spanish and Portuguese-speaking cultures, but not so much in our own. :D

Troll's Puzzle
10-04-2010, 01:20 AM
male anglo names are hard to choose. They are usually either (i) boring/gay (alfie) (ii) preposterous today (Eggbert, Aethelbartalwulfricstan). Non-anglo germanic and particularly slavic men have particularly cool choices by contrast (Rutger, Dragan, or any 'bosnian war crimial' - Ratko, Radovan - they all sound bad-ass. Probably not 'slobodan' though).

Noone has mentioned 'Clifford', though, which is the only real bad-ass sounding male anglo saxon name I'm aware of (I use 'bad-assery' as my scale of aproval for male names - in case you hadn't noticed). Shortened to 'Cliff', it still sounds rock 'ard (literally, in fact). It's also my dad's name ;).

Girls names are easier to choose. A girl can get away with (almost) anything, so long as she isn't fugly as. Good list from Mickweo as well.

you can also try 'Wulfhere' for a boy :P

I agree with Mic... Osweo about giving english 'irish' names. Kids with Irish names (connor, liam etc) are also arseholes (this is a scientific fact).
'Anglo' place names might not be so bad though, and often sound OK in a modern context.

Megrez
10-04-2010, 01:27 AM
Interesting....
Hildefuns - Battle ready.
We have Hild in lots of names, but I've never seen anything like '-funs' as an ending. Perhaps it's unique to Gothic?

I looked in a Gothic dictionary, and it gives an Old English fus as a cognate, a word I've never encountered.
http://books.google.com.br/books?id=39UUAAAAIAAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=snippet&q=funs&f=false

So... *Hildfus! :p
The same source derives Alfonso not from Hildefuns, but from Athalafuns, of which a hypothetic English reflex would be *AEthelfus.
:)
Noteworthy is that fus remains true to the loss of nasal consonants before fricatives in English: Goth. tunthus, Eng. tooth, Goth. uns, Eng. us.

Also, a lot of names in the list you provided end in -swith. I already had a clue for what was it, but I did a research:

Origin of SWITH (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/swith)
Middle English, strongly, quickly, from Old English swīthe strongly, from swīth strong; akin to Gothic swinths strong, Old English gesund sound — more at sound
First Known Use: 13th century

Swinthei: Gothic for strength. A historical character with this element in the name:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amalaswintha

Etymology: http://www.20000-names.com/origin_of_baby_names/etymology_A_female/meaning_of_the_name_amalaswinth.htm

Megrez
10-04-2010, 01:32 AM
Yeah, I noticed that about Mexico too when I went there. There were loads of Edgars, Alfredos and Eduardos.

Funny how our names have survived and thrived in Spanish and Portuguese-speaking cultures, but not so much in our own. :D

I don't doubt that the most famous Edgar in the world is this Mexican actor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edgar_Vivar) :D

Loddfafner
10-04-2010, 02:00 AM
Why do so many of the more palatable Anglo-Saxon names evoke pimply teenagers with broken glasses held together with office supplies?

Megrez
10-04-2010, 02:15 AM
FRIDESWIDE (http://www.behindthename.com/name/frideswide)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: History
Modern form of the Old English name Friðuswiþ, formed of the elements frið "peace" and swiþ "strong". Saint Frideswide was an 8th-century English princess who became a nun. She is credited with establishing Christ Church in Oxford.

Anybody willing? :D

Osweo
10-04-2010, 02:17 AM
Osweo, continuing from your idea of updating the form of Old English names, what do you think of Ashwin? :cool:

http://unnecessaryg.com/lj/atx2010/seal%20of%20approval.jpg
http://www.frenzycardgames.com/2009xparside.gif
http://blogs.creativeloafing.com/tampacalling/files/2009/04/seal-700_368.jpg
http://www.bluegeek.co.za/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/seal-of-approval2.gif
http://www.oralanswers.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/ADA_seal_rdax_215x215.jpg

Funny how our names have survived and thrived in Spanish and Portuguese-speaking cultures, but not so much in our own. :D
Norman invasion + fall of Saints' cults. :(
And the Visigoths generally 'kicked arse' too. :p

Why do so many of the more palatable Anglo-Saxon names evoke pimply teenagers with broken glasses held together with office supplies?
Xenophilic leftist domination of the media with in-built bias against patriarchal traditional Germanic culture. :thumb001:

Debaser11
10-04-2010, 05:51 AM
By the way, Imperivm, you mentioned you were going to be an uncle. Congratulations. But are you actually getting a shot at naming your niece/nephew? I would assume the mother and father had a list of names already themselves.

Peasant
10-04-2010, 09:33 AM
Where's the 'twitching eye' smilie? ;)
Denby... Why not Ingleborough?! :tongue:rolleyes:



:rage They're not NAMES!!!!!!!!!!! :mad:

East Yorkshire was called variously DEIra, Dere, Deur...

The old form of modern 'dear' was diere

.. Who says? :confused:



The internet lied to me again...:icon_neutral: I didn't even notice the e and i where the wrong way round either.:(

Imperivm
10-04-2010, 06:18 PM
If the baby has your characteristics why not a mediteranean name something like Enrico, or Sophia? :)

cheeky

Imperivm
10-04-2010, 06:38 PM
By the way, Imperivm, you mentioned you were going to be an uncle. Congratulations. But are you actually getting a shot at naming your niece/nephew? I would assume the mother and father had a list of names already themselves.

Yes I will get a shot, she is my sister.

la bombe
10-04-2010, 06:54 PM
By the way, Imperivm, you mentioned you were going to be an uncle. Congratulations. But are you actually getting a shot at naming your niece/nephew? I would assume the mother and father had a list of names already themselves.

Not all parents have definite plans, I got to name my little brother just because my mom liked my name idea best.

Äike
10-04-2010, 07:17 PM
They aren´t so common.Swedish names, why should they be very common in here.

Again you are trolling. I have friends who's names are Erlend, Erling and Ingvar. I actually thought about recommending Erling too, but I do not think that it's a nice name.

Scandinavian names have been for a very long time, thus saying that they're not common is just false.

Kalevipoja ema nimi, meie rahvuseeposes, on Linda jne.

My name is Karl, which is an old Scandinavian name and there are many more examples.

You can put a "=" between Swedish/Scandinavian, German/Germanic names and Estonian names. If a name has existed among our people for 500 years, 1000 years or more, then it's an Estonian name.

Just like the name Mihkel(it is derived from Michael), it's an Estonian name, but it's from the bible thus from the Middle-East.

esaima
10-04-2010, 07:35 PM
Again you are trolling. I have friends who's names are Erlend, Erling and Ingvar. I actually thought about recommending Erling too, but I do not think that it's a nice name.

Scandinavian names have been for a very long time, thus saying that they're not common is just false.

Kalevipoja ema nimi, meie rahvuseeposes, on Linda jne.

My name is Karl, which is an old Scandinavian name and there are many more examples.



:confused::confused::confused:
You are trolling yourself!! I agree that Karl IS a common name but Erlend and Ingvar aren´t common Estonian names!These names like Erlend and Ingvar aren´t so widespread, can you understand it my wannabe Swede?
Erlend and Ingvar are common, widespread names in Estonia??Erling???-as an Estonian name?Maybe those names were common among your relatives, because you are Swede but me as an ordinary Estonian, I have never heard such a name!:shrug:Whom are you trying to bullshit?Me?


If a name has existed among our people for 500 years, 1000 years or more, then it's an Estonian name
I do not deny that we have very many names of Germanic origin but most of our (Estonian) names of Germanic origin come from Germans not from Scandinavians!You can not change this fact.:nono:
My greatgrandfather was also Karl and greatgreatgrandfather but they didn´t get their names because of viking influences but from German landowners.Seems that you know nothing about Estonian history.
Your wannabe Scandinavism is out of your control.

Lithium
10-04-2010, 07:35 PM
Karl, I'm sorry to tell you that, but not every thread here is for Estonia... ;]

Äike
10-04-2010, 07:46 PM
Karl, I'm sorry to tell you that, but not every thread here is for Estonia... ;]

Tell that to esäimä who trolls me in every thread and tries to start a discussion about Estonia/Estonians. I only recommended baby names and then I got bashed from recommending "Swedish names". All of those names are common among Estonians(and have been common for a very long time), I do not view them as "Swedish names".

esaima
10-04-2010, 07:59 PM
Of course you Karl are trying to make every thread here about Estonia!You are simply thinking that Estonians are a hyper-nordic masterrace!Oh, what an honour!:rolleyes:
I am tired to talk about Estonians all the time.Yes, I am Estonian but I do not consider myself unusual hyper-superman!I am interested in Bulgarians, in Swedes, in Italians as well!But I just had to react to the false facts!

Farcebook
10-04-2010, 07:59 PM
I've always liked the name "Alexandra" (for a girl of course). If it's a boy, please watch this instructional video on naming boys:

oo8CrY_ZfFk

Debaser11
10-04-2010, 08:15 PM
I've always liked the name "Alexandra" (for a girl of course). If it's a boy, please watch this instructional video on naming boys:

oo8CrY_ZfFk

I've watched that so many times. It's so true. He's basically identifying one part of the feminization of our culture. Those names like "Tucker" and "Brent" seem like mere symptoms. I have one of the "good" names, haha.

Come to think of it, George is quite a nice name.

Imperivm
10-04-2010, 08:47 PM
Stop shiting on my thread bloody Estonians (Karl). When I want information on Estonia it will be because I am playing ice cricket there. Also seeing all the threads you lot make, don't you think on this forum you should be discussing issues that are relative to the wider European world and not a small Baltic non country! :D

la bombe
10-04-2010, 09:02 PM
Stop shiting on my thread bloody Estonians (Karl). When I want information on Estonia it will be because I am playing ice cricket there. Also seeing all the threads you lot make, don't you think on this forum you should be discussing issues that are relative to the wider European world and not a small Baltic non country! :D

Indeed, you even asked for Celtic or Anglo-Saxon names! Why is Estonia even in this discussion at all? :p

Æscwyn
10-04-2010, 10:50 PM
Just thought of another Englisc girls name - Avril/Averil (from OE Eoforhild). It's my aunt's name as well as that of some obscure Canadian singer. ;)

Osweo
10-05-2010, 12:52 AM
Just thought of another Englisc girls name - Avril/Averil (from OE Eoforhild). It's my aunt's name as well as that of some obscure Canadian singer. ;)

Hmm...... Considering the form of Everidge, Erwin, Errol, Everick (Eoforric, Eoforwine, Eoforwulf, Eoforwic), I'm more inclined to view the similarity of Averil to Eoforhild as mere coincidence.

I'd expect Everild or Everill really, but am not even entirely sure if Eofor was an element much applied to women.

No Eofor- name is included in this list, for example;
http://eagle.cch.kcl.ac.uk:8080/pase/persons/index.html
(click 'view all women')

THese buggers
http://www.behindthename.com/php/search.php?nmd=n&terms=averil
... claim a 7th Century female saint of the name, but I never heard of one. And at such an early date, you'd think I would have.

But, bugger me...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Everilda
:p
http://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=3302
:eek:
http://saints.sqpn.com/sainte74.htm
:mad:

:o


... Evirilda is the form in the early Latin sources, mind. In later times, this seems to have been contaminated by the form of the far more popular French Avril (April). :p

Wyn
10-05-2010, 12:59 AM
I think really, every parent fears for their child at register time too much to give them names that go beyond a certain pale. Edmund you could get away with, Aethelwulf? That'll get some playground blank faces and how do you spell thats.

Osborne could definitely be revived as Osweo said though. Osborne should be revived, it's a great name.

Psychonaut
10-05-2010, 12:59 AM
Indeed, you even asked for Celtic or Anglo-Saxon names! Why is Estonia even in this discussion at all? :p

http://redwing.hutman.net/~mreed/Assets/ego.jpg (http://redwing.hutman.net/~mreed/warriorshtm/ego.htm)




For Ego, the discussion forum is all about him, and he regards discussions that stray from that topic as trivial dalliances. Although tolerant of an occasional shift in focus, Ego grows increasingly restive when the forum's attention shifts away from his interests, and he will often provoke conflict to reestablish himself as the subject at hand. Ego is one the the fiercest of all the Warriors and will fight to the death when attacked.

Äike
10-05-2010, 03:51 PM
Of course you Karl are trying to make every thread here about Estonia!You are simply thinking that Estonians are a hyper-nordic masterrace!Oh, what an honour!:rolleyes:
I am tired to talk about Estonians all the time.Yes, I am Estonian but I do not consider myself unusual hyper-superman!I am interested in Bulgarians, in Swedes, in Italians as well!But I just had to react to the false facts!

I'm sorry for Estonian people having names like Karl, Erlend, Erling, Ivar, Ingvar, Ingrid, Katrin, Linda etc. It's not my fault.

You were the person who made the first off-topic/trollish post into this thread. I just responded. I recommended some names common in Estonia, which wouldn't sound weird in the UK and I just get bashed. This is surreal.

Graham
10-05-2010, 05:11 PM
A few Celtic names I like

Girls: Mhairi(Vahree),Eilidh(Ay-leigh) ,

Boys: Lachlan, Ruaridh( Rory), Fionnlagh( Finlay) :P

Beorn
12-08-2010, 05:01 PM
Are you an Uncle yet?

Here's some names from my son's class at primary school.

Jack
Libby May
Eva
Mason
Kian
Daisy Mae
Aliyah
Kristofer
Jessica
Leigha
Ethan
Nia
Kianna
Logan
Kamia

We were going to call the boy Logan at one point, but thought better of it in the end. I do like Kristofer. He's of German ancestry I believe.

Sarmata
12-08-2010, 06:15 PM
My sons names are Artur and Wojciech

Wojciech is one of the oldest Slavic names. The name is formed from "woj" (Polish: "wój") a Slavic root pertaining to war (forming words like wojownik meaning warrior, and wojna meaning war) and "Ciech" (from an earlier form "tech") meaning joy,[1] with the resulting combination meaning "The joy of war" or "smiling warrior".
I like those names:)

Ushtari
12-08-2010, 10:34 PM
I like Kastriot(Albanian hero) and Driton(lighting) for boys and Aferdita(Afer=near, dita=day) and Teuta(Illyrian queen) for girls.

jerney
02-22-2011, 11:38 PM
Do you already have names picked out for your children? What are some of your favorites? What sort of names appeal you most? Do you have naming tradition within your family/culture that you follow? If you already have kids, did you end up going with the names you had previously liked before you had kids?

Personally I like a lot Germanic names, but I also like a lot of Christian names, and not because I care about them being Christian, but they're just more "traditional" and classic sounding and even if many are Semitic in origin they're also rooted in European history and I prefer that over all of these ridiculous trendy names people are giving their kids lately. Some of my favorite names are Michael, Daniel, Alexander, Matthias, Thorsten, and Dieter. I find girl names a bit harder though and the only one I can think of off the top of my head that I really like is Anneliese

Beorn
02-22-2011, 11:41 PM
Firstly, the mentality you should adopt is that beyond yourself and your partner, the name you choose for your child is your choice only.

Every other opinion is but a whisper in the wind.

As to my next child, I have been thinking that if it is a boy then Alfred or Wulfric would be good, or if it is a girl, then it would be her choice, so either some soppy Fenian name.
Either way, my boys are getting good old English names with which to live upto. ;)

Guapo
02-22-2011, 11:42 PM
I'm naming my future son Maksim.

Detfri
02-22-2011, 11:44 PM
I change tastes every day in this field. At the moment I like Ivan for males and Diana (right pronunciation is DEEAHNA) and Helèna for females. Also Amanda and Melissa are on the list.

la bombe
02-22-2011, 11:47 PM
For girls I like simple, feminine names. I hate the modern trend of giving girls names like Sam or doing ridiculous spelling (like randomly replacing Is with Ys, I know a girl naming her baby girl Addysen *barf*). Some of the ones I love are Mona, Lily, Sophie, Emma, Fiona, Isabel, Rhiannon and Saorla (pronounced seer-la).

For boys, again, simple. Adam, Ian, Evan, Ewan and Aaron.

jerney
02-22-2011, 11:50 PM
Firstly, the mentality you should adopt is that beyond yourself and your partner, the name you choose for your child is your choice only.

Well, Greek naming tradition states its not our choice at all :p. The first child is supposed to be named after the paternal grandfather, which I guess I could handle for the first, but if the second kid is my choice because it's supposed to be named after the maternal side, I'm definitely not naming it after either of my parents :thumb001:.

Beorn
02-22-2011, 11:52 PM
Rhiannon

One name I wish I could go back in time to change.

My daughter had that very fine Welsh name bestowed upon her. A name which thousands of her own had carried with pride before, but we awoke to reality on the bus one day to a shrill: "Ere! You didn name yur dohter after dat Rhianna, did ye mind?"

"No! I didn't name her after that halfcaste piece of talentless shit, you inbred Hartcliffe skank".

Moral! Be careful how you name your daughters. Famous whores have knabbed them all. :(

Adalwolf
02-22-2011, 11:53 PM
I've always liked the names Philip and Michael.

Grey
02-22-2011, 11:55 PM
I don't believe in "simple" names; only parents who don't care enough about what they're branding their child with for life. I was glad to have an uncommon name growing up; I felt different from the Johns and Michaels. My children will all have old-fashioned names with interesting meanings and which sound nice.

Beorn
02-22-2011, 11:57 PM
I don't believe in "simple" names; only parents who don't care enough about what they're branding their child with for life. I was glad to have an uncommon name growing up; I felt different from the Johns and Michaels. My children will all have old-fashioned names with interesting meanings and which sound nice.

I hated being called John as a child, but over time I came to appreciate the name. It made me fit into the crowd full of Michaels, Davids, Stuarts, James' and etc... :)

Grey
02-23-2011, 12:01 AM
I hated being called John as a child, but over time I came to appreciate the name. It made me fit into the crowd full of Michaels, Davids, Stuarts, James' and etc... :)

Oh, I didn't mean that there is anything wrong with those names; I just enjoyed having one all to myself, if you know what I mean.

Psychonaut
02-23-2011, 12:05 AM
I don't believe in "simple" names; only parents who don't care enough about what they're branding their child with for life. I was glad to have an uncommon name growing up; I felt different from the Johns and Michaels. My children will all have old-fashioned names with interesting meanings and which sound nice.

If your family tree is anything like mine, there should be plenty of interesting 19th century names to choose from. My family tree is filled with crazy names like Hypolite, Athanase, Honore, Osias, Zephir, Alfreda, Osite and Scholastique.

Wyn
02-23-2011, 12:12 AM
As to my next child, I have been thinking that if it is a boy then Alfred or Wulfric would be good,

Both great names. I rather like simply Wulf. I'd never persuade her though. :( Either way, I hope to get a good few traditional English names. :thumb001: As for female names, she's quite partial to Emma (which I like) and Riann (do not want). Girls names are much harder though. It's too easy to lumber a poor girl with something that sounds nice at the time but ends up...not.

I like a lot of the tried and tested 'simple' names - e.g. Michael for boys - but I wouldn't be doing my duty if I didn't throw some Anglo-Saxon stuff in. ;) Aldwyn is a particularly strong contender.

Beorn
02-23-2011, 12:17 AM
Girls names are much harder though. It's too easy to lumber a poor girl with something that sounds nice at the time but ends up...not.

You can't go wrong in constructing a fair rule of father naming the sons and mother naming the daughters.

Tolleson
02-23-2011, 12:21 AM
I was partial to Quinn for a girl and Tristan for a boy.

Aemma chose Number 1 son's name and it is absolutely perfect for him.

We also asked Aemma's Mom to chose a middle name for the first born. She chose her given name that has both a girl and a boy variant....in french of course. :thumb001: He now has three names. :D

If we had a second, my Mom would have been asked to provide a middle name.

Electronic God-Man
02-23-2011, 12:23 AM
My first born son will be getting my name. It's my father's name as first name and my grandfather's name as the middle name. I promised my father I'd do that.

I've felt tempted to name any others some wicked Puritan names from my family way back...Zaccheus, Nehemiah, Ovid, Tabor, Elkanah, Elisha, Ebenezer, Sylvanus, Amphillis, Eleazer, Elnathan, Ephraim, Persis, Abiah, Peleg, Ambrose, Ezra, Silas, Mehatible, Keturah, Barnabas, etc.

God help them. :D

jerney
02-23-2011, 12:25 AM
I was partial to Quinn for a girl and Tristan for a boy.

I wouldn't personally choose either of those names, but I think they're both really cute and unique without being annoying and trendy. Another name I group in that category is "Cora", which I would never use, but really love nonetheless

Nglund
02-23-2011, 12:26 AM
Niglund or Oswiu springs to mind ;)

Beorn
02-23-2011, 12:28 AM
Oswiu springs to mind ;)

That name took me to the Skadi forum for the very first time, looking for the name's pronunciation. Osweeeee-o has a lot to answer for for those early, crazy-hazy, Anglo-Saxon days :P

I let Osweeeeeeeeee-o tell the tale; if he remembers the damn thing :D

Osweo
02-23-2011, 12:33 AM
Well, Greek naming tradition states its not our choice at all :p. The first child is supposed to be named after the paternal grandfather, which I guess I could handle for the first, but if the second kid is my choice because it's supposed to be named after the maternal side, I'm definitely not naming it after either of my parents :thumb001:.
My Irish lot had similar traditions, but got round it with middle names.

Boy 1 = Paternal Grandad + name of choice (often from what Saint's day they were born on), subsequent kids go through the other grandparents. Make five and you get the reward of having to come up with a new name! :D Stupid thing is, the kids often get called by the middle name, and many people they know don't know their 'real' name. My Nana has a monosyllabic name that is a rather unobvious diminutive of her middle name. To hear the full name in various contexts confuses the hell out of people.


Niglund or Oswiu springs to mind ;)
Nigweo sounds good. Or Nigwulf. :rotfl:

I'm sure there's about ten threads on this same topic, of course... ;)

Grey
02-23-2011, 12:56 AM
If your family tree is anything like mine, there should be plenty of interesting 19th century names to choose from. My family tree is filled with crazy names like Hypolite, Athanase, Honore, Osias, Zephir, Alfreda, Osite and Scholastique.

Some of mine are uncommon by today's standards; some are just ridiculous. Some of the more unusual ones are Almeeta, Doshia, Florien, Grezallia, Issaqueanna, Merilda, & Varbe.

Great Dane
02-23-2011, 01:17 AM
I prefer traditional names. Germanic and Celtic names iare okay, Christians names are fine, be they Latin, Greek or Hebrew. What I think is dumb is people giving their children the current trendy names like Tiffany or Britney. Or naming them after states like Montana or Dakota. Androgynous names like Taylor or Shelby are bad, especially for boys. Giving females names that are usually surnames, like Madison. And 'unique' spellings.

Tolleson
02-23-2011, 01:23 AM
What I think is dumb is people giving their children the current trendy names like Tiffany or Britney.

I'm waiting for the day when these young girls are seniors! A wrinkly and/or sagging Tiffany/Britney is going to be interesting. :coffee:

jerney
02-23-2011, 01:23 AM
I prefer traditional names. Germanic and Celtic names iare okay, Christians names are fine, be they Latin, Greek or Hebrew. What I think is dumb is people giving their children the current trendy names like Tiffany or Britney. Or naming them after states like Montana or Dakota. Androgynous names like Taylor or Shelby are bad, especially for boys. Giving females names that are usually surnames, like Madison. And 'unique' spellings.

Apparently Tiffany comes from a Greek name (had no idea, just looked it up), but lol at this:

tiffany
Usual medieval English form of Greek Theophania “Epiphany”, from theos god + phainein to appear. This was once a relatively common name, given particularly to girls born on the feast of the Epiphany (6 January), and it gave rise to an English surname. As a given name, it fell into disuse until revived in the 20th century under the influence of the famous New York jewellers, Tiffany's, and the film, starring Audrey Hepburn, Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961). In 1982 this was the most popular of all female names in use among American Blacks, and thirty-third most popular among Whites.

I don't like the name Tiffany, but it's not as bad as all the Kaylies, Kylies, Kaylyns, Haileys, Savannahs, Averys, Addisons, Emmersons, Kendalls, etc..

mymy
02-23-2011, 01:29 AM
So much unusual names for me :D
Well, I'm not sure and I'm changing favorite names all the time, but right now Vera or Lada for a girl and Andrey for a boy.

Grey
02-23-2011, 01:40 AM
As far as specific examples, I like Adelaide, Lorelei, Margaret, & Genevieve for girls. Boys are more difficult, but I like Sebastian.

Blossom
02-23-2011, 01:42 AM
It's early for me and him to decide this but we talked about it. He likes Roman names for girl like Iria..and I like German ..though I'm not sure which one. For boy, he likes Roman aswell..and I like Otto or Markus. He likes Roman names because his family. I like German because they mean powerful to me and because of family aswell, I like Greek ones because I got few Greek names in my family and they're truly beautiful.

I think its very important choosing some pretty names with a meaning for you as parent, history or tradition if you want to and..knowing that you wont name your daughter or son as the next McDonald's product. I dont like these so modern names or the stupid way ppl name kids the same so you get an entire generation full of that name. I'm actually glad of how my parents named me, I'm proud of my name and that's what I want my future sons or daughters to do.

I'd never change my name.

Bloodeagle
02-23-2011, 01:46 AM
I've already named 3: Hanna, Hayden, and Lyra, our newest member will be named Henry. :)
Looks like I prefer names that start with the letter H.

Groenewolf
02-23-2011, 04:36 AM
I got a small book (http://www.fenris-postorder.com/traditionele-voornamen.html) with traditional Germanic names lying in one of my bookcases. But end choice will have to be discussed.

Óttar
02-23-2011, 07:07 AM
What I think is dumb is people giving their children the current trendy names like Tiffany or Britney.
Tiffany, a contraction of theophaneia, Greek. "Manifestation or appearance of (a) god." is trendy? :confused:

The latter is a variant of a region of France etymologically relating to Britons, do reckon. Could be wrong.

Blossom
02-23-2011, 08:08 AM
Ok, I was too sleepy last night to think about my fave names for girls but yes, I'd like Karla, Astrid, Erika or Heidi. For boys, as I said, Otto, Markus, Albrecht, Nils or Tobias.

Turkophagos
02-23-2011, 08:31 AM
We need names to cover both branches of the baby's ancestry. Something like Theophrastos-Gustav or Euphrosyne-Montana.

Blossom
02-23-2011, 08:39 AM
We need names to cover both branches of the baby's ancestry. Something like Theophrastos-Gustav or Euphrosyne-Montana.

Aldelphe-Gustav or Anise-(Montana)?

Oh Montana? Better Louisiana? or Indiana? (joke) :D

mymy
02-23-2011, 08:51 AM
From more international names I like Emma... But I think I will probably choose some old Slavic. It's bad that so much names become forgotten...
I found this interesting http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavic_names
Well, my name is one of those old Slavic :)

But anyway, it all depend on who will be father of my kids :D But if things don't change, probably will be some Slavic... or some used in both of countries...

Comte Arnau
02-23-2011, 11:11 AM
People nowadays give so little importance to naming their children that it's even sad to witness it... Despite the fact this is going to be his/her label all life long.

I'm not going to recommend any name because it's a very personal thing but just add some tips:

- Make it have a value that the child can be proud of. Do not name him/her after an ancestor's name if the name is extremely ridiculous to modern taste, but if it's a nice name that deserves to be 'passed on', let him/her know and feel proud about that transmission.

- Be aware of what the name means, even if it's a foreign name. Would you like to be called Lame, Blind or Little? Think about it before naming her Claudia, Cecilia and Paula then...

- Think about how it matches with the surname. Sometimes parents do not realize until later, even if it's obvious, and weird combinations appear that will be a reason for jokes everywhere they go.

- Be aware of possible connotations of the name in the society you live in. Either of the negative or the positive ones.

And then, personal taste (nice-sounding, simplicity, etc.). Unfortunately, most parents make this, personal taste, their first and only reason. Just bear in mind it's your child, not just a pet.

Blossom
02-23-2011, 11:40 AM
People nowadays give so little importance to naming their children that it's even sad to witness it... Despite the fact this is going to be his/her label all life long.

I'm not going to recommend any name because it's a very personal thing but just add some tips:

- Make it have a value that the child can be proud of. Do not name him/her after an ancestor's name if the name is extremely ridiculous to modern taste, but if it's a nice name that deserves to be 'passed on', let him/her know and feel proud about that transmission.

- Be aware of what the name means, even if it's a foreign name. Would you like to be called Lame, Blind or Little? Think about it before naming her Claudia, Cecilia and Paula then...

- Think about how it matches with the surname. Sometimes parents do not realize until later, even if it's obvious, and weird combinations appear that will be a reason for jokes everywhere they go.

- Be aware of possible connotations of the name in the society you live in. Either of the negative or the positive ones.

And then, personal taste (nice-sounding, simplicity, etc.). Unfortunately, most parents make this, personal taste, their first and only reason. Just bear in mind it's your child, not just a pet.

Well, Greek or Latin names always will have a meaning (and if not, from the Bible)...I dont think Paula or Claudia are bad names, once you just like it and forget about the ancient meaning. Who knows nowadays what Claudia means (without being informed previously)? ...I think that's the good thing on names, if you want to call your son ''little/humble'' you wont dont need to call it Mr. Humble...you'll call him Paul, which is a really nice latin name. :)

Comte Arnau
02-23-2011, 11:58 AM
Well, Greek or Latin names always will have a meaning (and if not, from the Bible)...I dont think Paula or Claudia are bad names, once you just like it and forget about the ancient meaning. Who knows nowadays what Claudia means (without being informed previously)?

Ignorance of the common mass about their past should never be an excuse.

Why naming someone with a word you don't know the meaning of? For the same reason, one could name them with a random combination of letters, or as the Egyptian couple who have recently given their daughter the name of Facebook.

You'll have then those people laughing at the names of Indians like 'Sitting Bull' while ignoring that their own names may have a similar ridiculous meaning. At least those Indians gave a value to those names.


...I think that's the good thing on names, if you want to call your son ''little/humble'' you wont dont need to call it Mr. Humble...you'll call him Paul, which is a really nice latin name. :)[/B]

It was not my intention to present those names as negative ones. They were just examples. What I meant is that you must be aware of it and give it the right value. In Catalan, for instance, the name for Paul is Pau, which also means Peace, so it has an extra value that must be considered. All I'm saying is that one must think twice and not do these things so randomly as they usually do.

Peerkons
02-23-2011, 12:43 PM
If I will have son I will name him Gunar - the name my grandfather had.
I also like names Gustav and Kurt.
For girl - hmm, have no clue. Maybe Laura

Lars
02-23-2011, 01:08 PM
No new wave tutti frutti names and no weak and soft sounding names.

Out of my head

Boy: Asger, Ejner, Ole, Erik, Aksel, Vagn, Gunnar

Girl: Astrid, Ingrid, Inge, Inger, Signe, Tove

Pallantides
02-23-2011, 01:13 PM
A proper name for a Boy is Bjørn(Beorn/Bear);)

Don Brick
02-23-2011, 01:14 PM
I haven´t given it much thought, but I´d probably name my children (unless perhaps my spouse was non-Finnish) with rather traditional Finnish names. I´ve come to notice that female names starting with letters A and E in particular appeal to me, like Aino, Ella and Eira for instance. For boys I think many names starting with T like Taneli and Tero tend to sound nice and powerful, even rather masculine. Many traditional names like Väinö, Eemeli and Aaro are great too. In general it seems that I prefer names with many airy vowels. Also the names should be at least somewhat unique and different. My children won´t just be some random nobodies. Special names for special people goddammit! Already putting pressure. :wink

Of course there are plenty of foreign names that I like too and are suitable and neutral within a Finnish context like Sofia and Gabriel. It´s important that the name fit with the surname and aren´t too difficult for others to pronounce.

Don Brick
02-23-2011, 01:19 PM
A proper name for a Boy is Bjørn(Beorn/Bear);)

We have the name Otso (sometimes Ohto) for bear, but I don´t like the way it sounds at all to be honest...

Btw all these names starting with B got me to thinking that Beren would be an awesome name. Tolkien came up with tons of other great ones. But I don´t think I´d have the audacity to do something like that. :) It would be a little weird I suppose...

Thorum
02-23-2011, 01:28 PM
Our two daughters are named Alina (http://www.behindthename.com/name/alina-2) Leigh (http://www.behindthename.com/name/leigh) and Linnea (http://www.behindthename.com/name/linne10a) Valerie (http://www.behindthename.com/name/valerie). (My first name is Leigh.)

If we had (or have) a boy we already decided on Erik (http://www.behindthename.com/name/erik) Richard (http://www.behindthename.com/name/richard)...

Thorum
02-23-2011, 01:38 PM
Can anyone suggest a good website devoted to name origins and meanings?

mymy
02-23-2011, 01:40 PM
Can anyone suggest a good website devoted to name origins and meanings?


This one is not bad http://www.behindthename.com/

Thorum
02-23-2011, 01:53 PM
Oops, almost forgot, I have always thought of Loki for a boy and Vulpix for a girl... ;)

Ojáncanu
02-23-2011, 02:27 PM
my favourite male names:

Iker, Iñigo,Álvar, Ruy, Serge-Sergio, Gerard (the catalan pronunciation, with the stress on the second sylab and the rolling "r")

Non Iberian male names:

Jaromir, Serj-Sergey, Dimitri, Johan, Timúr, Akira, Omar


Female names:

Armonía, Alma, Gadea, Azucena, Edurne, Irene, Izaskun, Liliana


Non Iberian female names:

Emily, Sabina, Johanna, Meriamme, Himawari, Olivia

Treffie
02-23-2011, 02:38 PM
A friend of mine who was infatuated with all things Gothic named his daughter Lucretia Borgia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucretia_Borgia) (Kreischer). I laughed at first when he said he wanted to give her that name, but then I realised that he was being serious. :p

Tolleson
02-23-2011, 02:39 PM
Oops, almost forgot, I have always thought of Loki for a boy and Vulpix for a girl... ;)

Slowly remove your lips from the respective butt cheeks noted above! :no:

Shameful, just shameful. :D

Äike
02-23-2011, 03:33 PM
There's a tradition in my family to name newborn boys after semi-distant ancestors. I was named after my great-grandfather's brother Karl, who died in WW2, fighting the hordes from the east. My cousin is named after my great-grandfather.

I like common Estonian names like Linda (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linda_%28Estonian_mythology%29), Kalev (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalev_%28mythology%29), Ingrid, Kadri, Kalle, Hanna, Liina, Ülo, Heidi, Mati, Madis, Kädi etc.

If I would have a son, then I would want him to have a similar name to me, like Kalle or Kaarel.

If I would have a daughter then there are a lot of names I like. Kadri, Katrin, Linda, Ingrid, Hanna-Liina etc.

Comte Arnau
02-23-2011, 06:52 PM
A friend of mine who was infatuated with all things Gothic named his daughter Lucretia Borgia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucretia_Borgia) (Kreischer). I laughed at first when he said he wanted to give her that name, but then I realised that he was being serious. :p

Wtf, lol! :p

One could make and effort and try to find a Celtic connection, by saying that the Aragonese surname, Borja, Italianized as Borgia, comes from the town of Borja, the name probably originating in the Celtiberian Bursao. But Gothic? Mein Goth! :D

Treffie
02-23-2011, 06:56 PM
Wtf, lol! :p

But Gothic? Mein Goth! :D

Yeah, it's the equivalent of calling a daughter Wednesday Addams :p

anonymaus
02-23-2011, 07:01 PM
I'm going to follow George Foreman's example and name them all the same way.

All children, male and female, will be named George.

Vasconcelos
02-23-2011, 07:29 PM
I like traditional and/or historical names, besides names of someone of your family. For example, I love Martim - after Martim Moniz - for a boy and Virgínia - my grand aunt - for a female.
My lady hates both tho :(

I questioned her if she likes Visigothic names like Leovigildo or Teodorico...you don't want to know how she replied lol

Comte Arnau
02-23-2011, 07:47 PM
I'm going to follow George Foreman's example and name them all the same way.

All children, male and female, will be named George.

Would that be legal?

I'm not sure now, but here I think you can't name brothers/sisters with the same name.

Ojáncanu
02-23-2011, 08:02 PM
my favourite male names:

Iker, Iñigo,Álvar, Ruy, Serge-Sergio, Gerard (the catalan pronunciation, with the stress on the second sylab and the rolling "r")

Non Iberian male names:

Jaromir, Serj-Sergey, Dimitri, Johan, Timúr, Akira, Omar


Female names:

Armonía, Alma, Gadea, Azucena, Edurne, Irene, Izaskun, Liliana


Non Iberian female names:

Emily, Sabina, Johanna, Meriamme, Himawari, Olivia

if I had to chose a name for my son would probably be Iñigo or Gerard. for a girl Gadea most likely

Sword of the Morning
02-23-2011, 08:36 PM
Is Aiden too trendy to use now?

I love the name, and have since I first heard it years and years ago, but now that it's so popular . . . :cry2

Wyn
02-23-2011, 09:12 PM
Is Aiden too trendy to use now?

I love the name, and have since I first heard it years and years ago, but now that it's so popular . . . :cry2

Aidan is a very nice name, and quite ancient (from the Old Irish Áedán, Modern Irish Aodhán). A 7th Century saint (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aidan_of_Lindisfarne) bears it. It's the opposite of trendy. :thumb001:

Bloodeagle
02-23-2011, 09:23 PM
Is Aiden too trendy to use now?

I love the name, and have since I first heard it years and years ago, but now that it's so popular . . . :cry2

I think it is a good name regardless of its popularity.
My son is named Hayden and I find it disturbing how it's now used as a unisex name. I guess he could always use his middle name, Cowan, if it gets too bad. :)

Germanicus
02-23-2011, 09:43 PM
I have 2 sons, my exwife and i had an understanding, if we had boys i had the choice of naming them, if it was girls she named them.

My choice of names for my sons were typically British; the only concession i made was choosing their middle names, i gave the eldest her fathers name, and my youngest her fathers middle name...i may be hard but i am fair:)

anonymaus
02-23-2011, 11:00 PM
Would that be legal?

I'm not sure now, but here I think you can't name brothers/sisters with the same name.

Sure it's legal. In fact, I'm changing your name to George too, George.

Great Dane
02-24-2011, 01:57 AM
Tiffany, a contraction of theophaneia, Greek. "Manifestation or appearance of (a) god." is trendy? :confused:

The latter is a variant of a region of France etymologically relating to Britons, do reckon. Could be wrong.

As jerney pointed out its revival as a name in America is due to the name of the jewelers and the film 'Breakfast at Tiffany's', that made it trendy in the 70s and early 80s.

Dark Angel
02-24-2011, 02:53 AM
I have a daughter now called Irina...my ex gave it to her. I like Nicholas, Adrian, Michael for boys names and Natalie, Andrea, Isabelle for girls names

jerney
03-30-2011, 07:37 AM
For some reason I forgot about this name, but I used to be in love with the name Lilja for a girl. I think it's very pretty and also has a nice, simple meaning.

Blossom
06-14-2011, 10:19 PM
I haven´t given it much thought, but I´d probably name my children (unless perhaps my spouse was non-Finnish) with rather traditional Finnish names. I´ve come to notice that female names starting with letters A and E in particular appeal to me, like Aino, Ella and Eira for instance. For boys I think many names starting with T like Taneli and Tero tend to sound nice and powerful, even rather masculine. Many traditional names like Väinö, Eemeli and Aaro are great too. In general it seems that I prefer names with many airy vowels. Also the names should be at least somewhat unique and different. My children won´t just be some random nobodies. Special names for special people goddammit! Already putting pressure. :wink

Of course there are plenty of foreign names that I like too and are suitable and neutral within a Finnish context like Sofia and Gabriel. It´s important that the name fit with the surname and aren´t too difficult for others to pronounce.

Aww...well, lets make people know we already choosed the baby names! Though not sure if we'd already should tell them!

Peyrol
06-14-2011, 10:21 PM
For a girl, i like Lucrezia, Lavinia and Giulia.

For a male, Adriano, Marco and Cesare.

Efim45
06-14-2011, 10:30 PM
If I have a son, his name will be William, James or John.
If I have a daughter, her name will be Mary Ann, Julie or Clarice.

Terek
06-14-2011, 10:38 PM
I very much like to preserve tradition in naming children, but more if the child will grow up in his native country.

My older sister's name is very unmistakeably Chechen, and the rest of us have names that are more common in Russia.

I like the names Aina and Laila for girls, and Rustam for boys. If I wanted to be really Caucasian I would choose Xazbulat :D

I don't really like excessively religious names, (Mohammed/Magomed, any name with Islam or Abdul or Ali attached) same with obviously Christian or Jewish names. It gives the child too much religious responsibility!
(The President of Dagestan was given the name Magomedsalam Magomedalievitch Magomedov)

Malva
06-14-2011, 11:02 PM
My first son will probably be called Rodrigo, and my second if it's a boy could be somethng like Santiago, Wynfrith (he doesn't like it) :P, Isidoro, Agustín, Fernando, Gregorio, Patrick (he doesnt like it either :() and Felipe.

For a girl, Elvira, Estefania, Alana, Christabel, Bárbara, Isabel, Jimena and Inés.

Cato
06-14-2011, 11:16 PM
My firstborn son will be named after me, Robert, with a middle name appropriate to my ancestry. I like the name Edward, so my the lad's full name would be Robert Edward Wilkins II.

As to a daughter, Emily Rose Wilkins.

Cato
06-14-2011, 11:25 PM
My firstborn son will be named after me, Robert, with a middle name appropriate to my ancestry. I like the name Edward, so my the lad's full name would be Robert Edward Wilkins II.

As to a daughter, Emily Rose Wilkins.

Robert is not only my name but also the name of my late grandfather on my father's side; Emily is the name of my late grandmother on my mother's side. So both names have a very special significance to me. :)

Oreka Bailoak
06-15-2011, 01:17 AM
I love the old southern United States first and middle name combinations-

Sarah Caroline
Elizabeth Apsley
Emma Amelia
Penelope ("Penny") (forgot the middle name that goes with it)(I'd probably use this one as a middle name instead of first name though)

Efim45
06-15-2011, 01:23 AM
If I have a son, his name will be William, James or John.
If I have a daughter, her name will be Mary Ann, Julie or Clarice.

More specifically; William Wallace, James Ray(jimmy ray), John Jefferson, Julie Cutie-Patootie and Clarice Finkelshtein.

Bridie
06-15-2011, 01:23 AM
My next child will bear a Spanish name. :) Or maybe I'll have two more.

Osweo
06-15-2011, 01:30 AM
I also like Celtic names;
:tsk: My heart sank even before I read on...

Liam, = Irish short form of William, i.e. WILHELM = about as Celtic as Nelson Mandela.

Aiden, ...okay... Though it's normally spelt 'Aidan' in English. Aedan in the Irish...
Jayden, = fuck knows. Looks like some illliterate made it up (http://www.behindthename.com/name/jaden).
Tristian, = Tristan! There is no 'I' in it.
Ainsley, = an English place-name. :confused: Aegen's Leah. The 'wood/clearing of a man named Aegen'.
Gwyneth. = a place-name really.


I also like German names; Frederick, Nicolas = GREEK, Johann =HEBREW (this name wouldn't work in America but it's my favorite German name), Elisabeth. = HEBREW

English names are too common/plain for my taste.
Frederick, Nicholas and Elizabeth are very common here, and have been for centuries. :shrug:

Okay, I know it's not always easy to find the 'facts'. Here's a good website for it though:
http://www.behindthename.com/

Bloodeagle
06-15-2011, 01:45 AM
More specifically; William Wallace, James Ray(jimmy ray), John Jefferson, Julie Cutie-Patootie and Clarice Finkelshtein.

How about John Jacob Jingleheimer Schmidt? His name is my name too. :D

Dario Argento
06-15-2011, 01:45 AM
Most my family have stereotypical Hungarian names.

My name is Attila, my dad's Gyula. Grandfather is István. Some cousins are Janos, Zoltán, etc.

Sikeliot
06-15-2011, 01:54 AM
For a girl; Alaina, Ana, Adriana, Maria (or Mariana), Janine, Juliana, Monica, Amelia, Sonia, Susana/Suzanna, Tatiana, Teresa, Ursula, Veronica.

For boys the names I like are much more plain. Dylan, Jonathan, Corey, Alan, Andrew, Brandon or Brendon, Chase, Christian, Connor, Evan, and others.

la bombe
06-15-2011, 02:07 AM
I've really fallen in love with the names Guinevere or Gwendolyn for girls and I don't know why. Maybe I've been watching too much Merlin.

Osweo
06-15-2011, 02:10 AM
Note to non-English who do not live in anglophone societies:

Please please PLEASE do NOT call your children an English name (including fashionable 'Celtic' and stupid made up names sadly prevalent in English-speaking lands).

If you do, and by chance I should ever be in your country and hear you call to your child "Ae, DYLAN/WENDY, quedshere nujt pe alorgje!", then I will do this facial expression:

:tsk:

and think you a stupid idiot with no pride in his/her own people. Depending on my mood, I may weep a little too.

Efim45
06-15-2011, 02:12 AM
I think naming my children after my wife's or my own ancestors would be a good idea. I like my great-grandfather's great-grandfather's name (Ioann/John) and my Mordvin great-great-grandfather's name (Pyotr/Peter).

Beorn
06-15-2011, 02:12 AM
stupid made up names:costumed-smiley-083

EDIT: Stop calling your children 'John' or Jonathan'.

It is a shit name. It is connected with toilets, condoms and dead bodies.

Great parents you would make.

Max
06-15-2011, 02:24 AM
Boy-Demetri Maximovich Sokolnikov
Girl- Anastasia Maximovna Sokolnikova

Grandpa would be proud :thumb001:

Gamera
06-15-2011, 04:09 AM
I think Lumi (finnish) or Deborah are beautiful names for a girl, but I would also consider names of my ancestors.

If a boy, I like the name Ante for some reason. Also my grandfather's name, of course, who shares the same name as me.

Given my ancestry, I have a wide variety to chose from anyway. :P

Boudica
06-15-2011, 04:15 AM
When I have a boy I want to name him Alexander, I absolutely love that name, but I don't know what I'd name a girl.

Dario Argento
06-15-2011, 04:25 AM
When I have a boy I want to name him Alexander, I absolutely love that name, but I don't know what I'd name a girl.

Alexandra :D

Cato
06-15-2011, 04:41 AM
I forgot that I intended to call my first son Junior. :)

Peyrol
06-15-2011, 10:17 AM
I forgot that I intended to call my first son Junior. :)

I always wonder why you anglo-americans often have the tradition to give your/you father name to a son.
Whence comes this tradition?

Äike
06-15-2011, 10:48 AM
I think Lumi (finnish) or Deborah are beautiful names for a girl, but I would also consider names of my ancestors.

If a boy, I like the name Ante for some reason. Also my grandfather's name, of course, who shares the same name as me.

Given my ancestry, I have a wide variety to chose from anyway. :P

Lumi is an Estonian/Finnish name and means "snow" in both languages, but I have never met anyone with that name. Calling your daughter, "snow", sounds interesting, I have never thought about that name.

Bridie
06-15-2011, 11:26 AM
I always wonder why you anglo-americans often have the tradition to give your/you father name to a son.
Whence comes this tradition?I think its just an ego thing.

American men tend to have bigger than usual egos.

Cato
06-15-2011, 11:34 AM
I always wonder why you anglo-americans often have the tradition to give your/you father name to a son.
Whence comes this tradition?

I'm surprised that you ask this question. ;)

Wasn't the father of Gaius Julius Caesar, Dictator, also named Gaius Julius Caesar? :thumb001:

Bridie
06-15-2011, 11:44 AM
I'm surprised that you ask this question. ;)

Wasn't the father of Gaius Julius Caesar, Dictator, also named Gaius Julius Caesar? :thumb001:Italian men have big egos too. :wink

Blossom
06-15-2011, 11:46 AM
Sweeties, want to name your kids after such beautiful names from Nordic mythology? Or just want a little help for choosing the best name? Then check this out. I love a lot of names from there..me and DD already decided (lol haha).

Check this out :) interesting things and explanation for names in case you need it. (http://www.nordicnames.de/wiki/Main_Page)

Cato
06-15-2011, 11:56 AM
Sweeties, want to name your kids after such beautiful names from Nordic mythology? Or just want a little help for choosing the best name? Then check this out. I love a lot of names from there..me and DD already decided (lol haha).

Check this out :) interesting things and explanation for names in case you need it. (http://www.nordicnames.de/wiki/Main_Page)

The one name of a Norse deity that I definitely like is Freyja.

Blossom
06-15-2011, 12:01 PM
The one name of a Norse deity that I definitely like is Freyja.

True, is nice but maybe ''too common''...have a look on that site, lot of beautiful ''unknown''/not used names.:)

Arne
06-15-2011, 12:02 PM
For a Girl it´ll be either

Astrid (which would made her to be a redhaired viking)
I think of Girls called Astrid as more compact ones.

Ulrike (die Reiche,the rich one,also very northgerman)
ulrike ackermann
http://www.welt.de/multimedia/archive/01315/mst_Ulrike_Ackerma_1315291z.jpg
My Asocciation with Ulrike is mostly a quite tall,skinny type.

Clara/Klara (means something like enlightened Light) (Klara von Assisi)
Katharina/Catherine in the Anglosphere :p (Katharina the Great)
Never it should be something like Ursula or Angela.
Like Ursula van der Leyen

A Boy could be named
Lars (quite a nordic name,like lars ullrich )
Frederic (like Frédéric Chopin /half frog half mong)

Alexander would be the worst Choice together with Wladimir.

I wouldn´t give the child names cause they exist in the family.

Cato
06-15-2011, 12:07 PM
A few other names off of the top of my head:

Brandon, Brian, Eamon, James, John, Morgan, Patrick, Phelan.

Caitlin, Catherine, Colleen, Eleanor, Elizabeth, Judith, Melissa.

Etc.

Peyrol
06-15-2011, 01:00 PM
I'm surprised that you ask this question. ;)

Wasn't the father of Gaius Julius Caesar, Dictator, also named Gaius Julius Caesar? :thumb001:

Yes, but nowadays is most diffused the he naming with a grandparent's name, or both.
For example, my name is Lorenzo, but the full name is Lorenzo Michele Andrea, where Michele was my grandfather from paternal side, and Andrea my granfather from mom side. :)

alzo zero
06-15-2011, 01:08 PM
Boy: Federico, Lorenzo, Marco, Tommaso

Girl: Ludovica, Giulia, Gaia

I know that in my whereabouts in the 80's a lot of people used to call their kids Jennifer, Alan, Omar, Consuelo, Maicol (pronounced like Michael :D). Luckily these names aren't very fashionable anymore, although we now have our Mohammeds, Samirs, Suleymans, etc. thanks to the newcomers. :)

Peyrol
06-15-2011, 01:10 PM
Boy: Federico, Lorenzo, Marco

Girl: Ludovica, Giulia, Gaia

I know that in my whereabouts in the 80's a lot of people used to call their kids Jennifer, Alan, Omar, Consuelo, Maicol (pronounced like Michael :D). Luckily these names aren't very fashionable anymore, although we now have our Mohammeds, Samir, Suleyman, etc. thanks to the newcomers. :)

True, especially by napolitan mothers with the television as a only-one reason of life :laugh:

Arne
06-15-2011, 01:11 PM
Boy: Federico, Lorenzo, Marco, Tommaso

Girl: Ludovica, Giulia, Gaia

I know that in my whereabouts in the 80's a lot of people used to call their kids Jennifer

Gwenhyfar is a very Celtic Name.
As Jennifer it´s used in Germany.
Had known a busty Girl with that Name. :coffee:

alzo zero
06-15-2011, 01:12 PM
True, especially by napolitan mothers with the television as a only-one reason of life :laugh:
Believe me, that habit was very widespread among Brescian "rednecks" as well... Of those 70/80's tamarro names the only one still resisting is Deborah.

Treffie
06-15-2011, 01:16 PM
Lumi is an Estonian/Finnish name and means "snow" in both languages, but I have never met anyone with that name. Calling your daughter, "snow", sounds interesting, I have never thought about that name.

Welsh has a habit of giving children's names pertaining to the weather and geographical landmarks.

Eira - snow
Gwlythin - dew drop
Haulwen - sunshine
Haf - summer
Bryn - hill
Blodwen - flower
Eirlys - snowdrop
Enfys - rainbow
Ffion - foxglove
Glyn - valley
Hefin - summer (male)
Tesni - warmth of the sun - Apricity :p

Peyrol
06-15-2011, 01:18 PM
Believe me, that habit was very widespread among Brescian "rednecks" as well... Of those 70/80's tamarro names the only one still resisting is Deborah.

Also a little in Bergamo...i know a girls named Sharon Beltrami and another one Lindsay Castelli :laugh: :( :laugh: :(

Anyway, the combination albionic name/italian surname produce some ridiculouses names like John Napolitano, Jack Esposito, Andrew Rossi..:laugh::laugh:

alzo zero
06-15-2011, 01:23 PM
Also a little in Bergamo...i know a girls named Sharon Beltrami and another one Lindsay Castelli :laugh: :( :laugh: :(
Of course! How could I forget Sharon Zampetti! :icon_lol: Unfortunately I've never had the pleasure to meet an Italian girl called Lindsey. :( Not yet...

Peyrol
06-15-2011, 01:25 PM
Of course! How could I forget Sharon Zampetti! :icon_lol: Unfortunately I've never had the pleasure to meet an Italian girl called Lindsey. :( Not yet...

You never been in Torre Boldone or Villa di Serio, lucky for you :laugh:

The Ripper
06-15-2011, 01:32 PM
Welsh has a habit of giving children's names pertaining to the weather and geographical landmarks.

Eira - snow
Gwlythin - dew drop
Haulwen - sunshine
Haf - summer
Bryn - hill
Blodwen - flower
Eirlys - snowdrop
Enfys - rainbow
Ffion - foxglove
Glyn - valley
Hefin - summer (male)
Tesni - warmth of the sun - Apricity :p

Its the same with Finnish names, especially female ones.

For example:

Suvi - Summer
Talvi(kki) - Winter
Tuuli(kki) - Wind
Säde - Ray
Orvokki - Viola
Vuokko - a kind of flower I guess
Päivi - derived from the word for day
Taimi - Seedling
Marja - Berry

Laubach
06-15-2011, 07:47 PM
If I have a boy I want to name him Werner in honor of my grandfather. I I have a girl i want to name her Lorena or Priscila or Sophie

Mordid
06-15-2011, 09:22 PM
If I have a boy, I'd name him Mordidska and If I have a girl, I'd name her Mymyski.

Arne
06-15-2011, 10:38 PM
If I have a boy, I'd name him Mordidska and If I have a girl, I'd name her Mymyski.

Or simply Wladimir.

Comfrey
06-15-2011, 10:44 PM
If I had a boy I would name him Alfred, an old english name meaning 'elf counsel'. My grandfather and great grandfather were both called Alfred.
I also like Wilfred, Rory, Edmund and Rowan.

For a girl, Fionnghuala, Brigid (my great aunt's name), Fiona, Martha, Janet (grandmother) or Clara (other grandmother). I would also add a surname from my mother's side of the family as a middle name.

Malva
06-15-2011, 11:48 PM
Note to non-English who do not live in anglophone societies:If you do, and by chance I should ever be in your country and hear you call to your child "Ae, DYLAN/WENDY, quedshere nujt pe alorgje!", then I will do this facial expression: .

LEt me tell you that Dylan has actually an English father and a Spanish mother and lives in an anglophone society.

Wendy, however, is unforgivable. :D

Osweo
06-15-2011, 11:56 PM
LEt me tell you that Dylan has actually an English father and a Spanish mother and lives in an anglophone society.
That was not the Dylan I had in mind. Somebody else mentioned it above, as a potential son's name.

Actually, I'm as dismayed at English giving their kids Welsh (or Irish) names, as I am at Continentals doing it. :tsk:


Wendy, however, is unforgivable. :D

;)

jerney
08-10-2011, 03:12 PM
Jeez whatever happened to people giving their children "normal", non made up names. I just noticed that I have one retard on my facebook who named their daughter "Jaydaka" and another who named their kid "Deviny" :roll eyes

Stars Down To Earth
08-10-2011, 03:58 PM
Jeez whatever happened to people giving their children "normal", non made up names. I just noticed that I have one retard on my facebook who named their daughter "Jaydaka" and another who named their kid "Deviny"
Hehehehe, I know an idiot who named her baby duaghter "Beyonce"...

And let's not even bring up American blacks, who name their kids things like "LaTronia" and "Zyneene".

AntonyCapolongo
08-10-2011, 04:05 PM
For boy : Andriéu (Gascon/Occitan name) who is like "Andrew"
For girl : Estello (Provençal name)

The Ripper
08-10-2011, 04:08 PM
Jeez whatever happened to people giving their children "normal", non made up names. I just noticed that I have one retard on my facebook who named their daughter "Jaydaka" and another who named their kid "Deviny" :roll eyes

I've noticed that mulatto kids are more often subject to such name-rape than all-Finnish kids here... ;)

rhiannon
08-10-2011, 04:13 PM
Do you already have names picked out for your children? What are some of your favorites? What sort of names appeal you most? Do you have naming tradition within your family/culture that you follow? If you already have kids, did you end up going with the names you had previously liked before you had kids?

Personally I like a lot Germanic names, but I also like a lot of Christian names, and not because I care about them being Christian, but they're just more "traditional" and classic sounding and even if many are Semitic in origin they're also rooted in European history and I prefer that over all of these ridiculous trendy names people are giving their kids lately. Some of my favorite names are Michael, Daniel, Alexander, Matthias, Thorsten, and Dieter. I find girl names a bit harder though and the only one I can think of off the top of my head that I really like is Anneliese

My son's name is Derek. My daughter's name is Andrea. Andrea is 21 years older than Derek:) We had to name her rather quickly, as I was being wheeled out of the hospital when the nurse came running up to tell us we had forgotten to put a name on her birth certificate!!

Had Derek been a girl, names we had in mind for a girl were Astrid and Shannon.

Aces High
08-10-2011, 05:58 PM
Jeez whatever happened to people giving their children "normal", non made up names.

I was watching a play on the bbc one day and the directors name on the final credits was Stanley Donald Margoyles..........which every Brit knows comes out as stand on me goolies.......wtf were his parents thinking of....?

Æscwyn
08-10-2011, 06:38 PM
Edith, Isabel, Rose and Katherine.
Henry, Edward, William and Alfred.

I also like the names Elswyth and Wulfric, but probably wouldn't be daring enough to use them in first position. :D

jerney
08-10-2011, 06:40 PM
Isabel, Rose and Katherine are all beautiful

Osweo
08-10-2011, 09:32 PM
Isabel, Rose and Katherine are all beautiful

Edith is beautifuller. ;)

Turkophagos
08-10-2011, 09:50 PM
Hyacinthus-Theobald sounds so cool! This is going to be my first son's name.

Troll's Puzzle
08-10-2011, 09:51 PM
Hehehehe, I know an idiot who named her baby duaghter "Beyonce"...

And let's not even bring up American blacks, who name their kids things like "LaTronia" and "Zyneene".

that's alright, in my opinion.

better than calling them
'Winston Kingsley' or whatever.

too many good, old fashioned, stylish 'English' names are almost purely black nowadays.

we lost our language, our names... etc... :(

part of what made us unique


it's also kind of symbolic: blacks have bombastic, strutting English names like 'Reginald'
while English parents give their boys faggot names like 'alfie', semite names like 'Joseph', or mick names like 'Liam'

jerney
08-10-2011, 09:52 PM
Hyacinthus-Theobald sounds so cool! This is going to be my first son's name.

Wait until you have only daughters

Malva
08-10-2011, 09:55 PM
Isabel

This is a name I like a lot, aesthetically and for historical reasons.

Sikeliot
08-10-2011, 10:43 PM
Does anyone else like the name Fiona? It's always been one of my favorite female names.

mymy
08-10-2011, 10:51 PM
Hm, i just realized i don't have favorite names anymore. I will think when time for that come and if come, but not before the time :)

SilverKnight
08-10-2011, 10:57 PM
Yes, my favorites are

for Boys -
Sebastian (dedicated to a best friend of mines from Sweden)
Leonardo
Alexander

for Girls -
Yazmine
Rose
Kimberly

Comte Arnau
08-11-2011, 08:50 PM
Nepomucen, Selasphoros and Desolation.

Beorn
08-13-2011, 07:03 AM
too many good, old fashioned, stylish 'English' names are almost purely black nowadays.

Ossy cringes at the mere mention of it, but my son's name inspires a noble Saxon urge.


we lost our language, our names... etc... :(

We didn't fucking lose it! :mad: We misplaced it and forgot it belong to US!

I was gonna call my son Alfred (Alfie for short) but seeing as you took it up for one to be 'blackened' then I have to admit I have retreated to the drawing board.

I'll be back with just as equal a name to keep our ethnicity alive. :thumb001:

Absinthe
08-13-2011, 07:13 AM
My parents went against the custom that says the child has to take the name of the grandparent, and gave me a non-Christian name from Greek mythology.

I am very thankful for that as I love my name and it is so "me" :D

So I think I would also give my children, theoretically speaking, ancient Greek names.
But not something too fancy as in the case of some neo-pagan lunatics who name their children with very boisterous and unusual names. :p

Boudica
08-13-2011, 07:25 AM
I may have already posted on this thread about this but I can't remember :P.. O'h well..
For a boy- Alexander, it just has a strong/royal tone to it..
For a girl- Diana :)

Aces High
08-13-2011, 07:28 AM
So I think I would also give my children, theoretically speaking, ancient Greek names.


Why ?

Everybody does that,when i was in Greece the amount of taxi drivers called Hermes and Zeus and waiters called Aristophones got beyond a joke.

Absinthe
08-13-2011, 07:29 AM
Why ?

Everybody does that,when i was in Greece the amount of taxi drivers called Hermes and Zeus and waiters called Aristophones got beyond a joke.
Because I love ancient Greek names, especially from mythology, and each of them has a special meaning. By the same token, I dislike Chistian names much as I also dislike Christianity. :)

Aces High
08-13-2011, 08:28 AM
Isnt it a bit much though to burden your child with a name that you love and has a special meaning only to you...?

Absinthe
08-13-2011, 08:29 AM
Isnt it a bit much though to burden your child with a name that you love and has a special meaning only to you...?
Doesn't this hold truth for all given names?

Aces High
08-13-2011, 08:33 AM
There are a lot of variables imo,i suppose if the child has a Greek surname then it could pass....but calling a child Archimedes fitzpatrick would probably plant the seed of parentel murder in the childs head as soon as he went to infants school.

Absinthe
08-13-2011, 08:37 AM
For that reason I would not name a child Thor or Freja. Still, I don't get your objections. Isn't "Giorgos" (George, in Greek) equally arbitrary as Archimedes?



Isnt it a bit much though to burden your child with a name that you love and has a special meaning only to you...?


Archimedes sounds better than Giorgos and it has a special meaning, not only to me, as you said, but for the whole of Greeks and our culture/heritage.

I don't get why you object to that, Greeks wanting genuine Greek names for their children.

Aces High
08-13-2011, 08:40 AM
[QUOTE=Absinthe;498798
I don't get why you object to that, Greeks wanting genuine Greek names for their children.[/QUOTE]

I dont....i didnt know you were Greek.

Zankapfel
08-13-2011, 08:44 AM
I was given an ancient Norse name.

I'm not sure I'd choose the same for my children, though.

The Ripper
08-13-2011, 09:00 AM
All my future children will be given ur-finnic names. :D

Rainraven
08-13-2011, 09:02 AM
Hunter, Abigail, Imogen, Logan

HAIL :D

Troll's Puzzle
08-15-2011, 12:20 AM
I was gonna call my son Alfred (Alfie for short) but seeing as you took it up for one to be 'blackened' then I have to admit I have retreated to the drawing board.

I'll be back with just as equal a name to keep our ethnicity alive. :thumb001:

Alfred is a fine name, I don't think it's 'blackened'.
(I was saying bombastic English names like 'Winfred', 'Winston', 'Reginald', heck even 'Oswald (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/celebritynews/3450104/Ozwald-Boateng-Bond-should-have-British-tailor.html)', are often used by nigz, while English boys have non-English or limp wristed 'matey' english names, and that is strangely symbolic of the current situation)

I just think it's 'faggot' to call your son 'Alfie' on the birth cert or whatever (it's in the top 10 names or somethign like that, FFS).

If he was called Alfred (which is Great :P), the Troll's-Puzzically Correct abbraviation of his name would be Alf.

a good & strong name with a fine tradition, to be sure :thumbs up

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_k0Vi9rMfJds/S7frzvN3vuI/AAAAAAAAAHY/YwP4YHONMcw/s320/Sir_Alf_Garnett.JPG


Hunter, Abigail, Imogen, Logan

HAIL :D

I like, but Abigail is semite, so:

Hunter, Emma, Imogen, Logan.

;)

Beorn
08-15-2011, 12:31 AM
I just think it's 'faggot' to call your son 'Alfie' on the birth cert or whatever (it's in the top 10 names or somethign like that, FFS).

I'm with ya now, Trolly. :thumb001:

I had this conversation with the other half just yesterday. My son thinks 'Harry' would be a great name for the baby if it is a boy, and we were in agreement with him, but when I mentioned his name on the certificate should be Harold, the missus got all funny and said I was 'odd for always choosing those sort of names'.

:mmmm:

Harry = Harold.

Osweo
08-15-2011, 12:37 AM
I hate people. FUCKING thick. :rage

Terek
08-15-2011, 12:45 AM
Maybe I answered this before, but I will choose Rustam and Aina. Those are good names.

Wanderlust
08-15-2011, 08:31 PM
My parents went against the custom that says the child has to take the name of the grandparent, and gave me a non-Christian name from Greek mythology.

I am very thankful for that as I love my name and it is so "me" :D

So I think I would also give my children, theoretically speaking, ancient Greek names.
But not something too fancy as in the case of some neo-pagan lunatics who name their children with very boisterous and unusual names. :p

Such as? :p

Electra is a very nice name imo.

BiałaZemsta
08-16-2011, 12:03 AM
For a girl- Basia, Gosia, Sylwia, Krystyna, Dorota
For a boy- Chris, Ivan, Maksim, Andrzej

_______
08-18-2011, 04:14 AM
thor for a boy and freya for a girl

Thraex
08-18-2011, 04:27 AM
Boy:

Dusan
Darko

Girl:

Milla
Jelena

larali
10-22-2011, 02:43 PM
My children do have names. I won't post them online though. :P

Armand_Duval
10-22-2011, 02:51 PM
My children do have names. I won't post them online though. :P

C´mon Larali, and what would it be the big deal about it?????:confused:


Cheers.

Mordid
10-22-2011, 02:55 PM
Boy: Mordidski
Girl: Venedaska

Armand_Duval
10-22-2011, 03:11 PM
I have a kid whose name is Franco.

Armand_Duval
10-22-2011, 03:32 PM
If I have another boy I'd name him:

Alonso.
Maximilian.
Maximo.


It ist a baby girl:

Anaís.
Andrea.

Whiteruthenian
10-22-2011, 04:21 PM
What sort of names appeal you most?I think it's a good idea to name your children after your grandparents and great-grandparents.

Osweo
10-22-2011, 04:47 PM
I think it's a good idea to name your children after your grandparents and great-grandparents.

Vladlen and Stalina!? ;)

Sahson
10-22-2011, 04:49 PM
I like the female name ekaterina.

research_centre
10-22-2011, 05:16 PM
If I have anbother boy I'd name him:

Alonso.
Maximilan.
Maximo.


It ist a baby girl:

Anaís.
Andrea.

Although Andrea is from Greek and it means manly.

Whiteruthenian
10-22-2011, 10:44 PM
Vladlen and Stalina!? ;):eek: Oh my God, no!

Andrey (two great-grandfathers), Stepan, Levon, Adam...

Paraska, Paulina, Maria, Kulina... and maybe even Sikleta. :thumbs up

Osweo
10-22-2011, 10:47 PM
:eek: Oh my God, no!

Andrey (two great-grandfathers), Stepan, Levon, Adam...

Paraska, Paulina, Maria, Kulina... and maybe even Sikleta. :thumbs up

Nice but surely there's enough Andreys na Rusi now? 99% of the male population?

Praskovya/Parasha is wonderful... ;) But Sikleta.. :eek: wow.

Armand_Duval
10-22-2011, 10:51 PM
Although Andrea is from Greek and it means manly.

Yes that's right although Andrea is a relatively common female name in spanish speaking countries.

Whiteruthenian
10-22-2011, 11:01 PM
Nice but surely there's enough Andreys na Rusi now? 99% of the male population?Yep. But the fact that my two great-grandparents were Andreys would be the decisive argument. :nod
Praskovya/Parasha is wonderful... ;) But Sikleta.. :eek: wow.The name was used by people as my* and my grandfather's nickname. :)

- Чый ты, хлопчык?
- Сіклецін. Сцепана Сіклеціного ўнук.

*Was it used correctly?

Sahson
10-24-2011, 04:08 AM
Nice but surely there's enough Andreys na Rusi now? 99% of the male population?

Praskovya/Parasha is wonderful... ;) But Sikleta.. :eek: wow.

kinda of like how common Svetlana is.

Laubach
10-24-2011, 03:49 PM
My son will be named Werner, in honor of my grandfather, who was a very important person to me. If she had a girl, the name is Sophie.

Laubach
10-24-2011, 03:50 PM
kinda of like how common Svetlana is.

oh, I have good memories about this name:p

Osweo
10-24-2011, 08:55 PM
The name was used by people as my* and my grandfather's nickname. :)

*Was it used correctly?

Znaesh', dazhe ne znayu ... U nas uzhasny yazyk. :o A instinkt mne skazhet "govori 'mine and my grandad's" ili, dobavit' slovo 'both' kak proyasnetilnaya extra do slova 'mine'"... :strokebeard:

Sylvanus
10-24-2011, 09:28 PM
boy: Raymond, Roland, Richard, Reginald,

girl: Amalaswintha (lol I know :P), Claudia, Anna,

Peyrol
10-25-2011, 11:10 AM
boy: Raymond, Roland, Richard, Reginald,

girl: Amalaswintha (lol I know :P), Claudia, Anna,

Ostergoten

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amalasuntha

Fra Baldracco
10-25-2011, 11:36 AM
male - Calogero
female - Catena

The Alchemist
10-25-2011, 11:37 AM
My favourite names are: Otto and Gretel (obviously) :D
I also like: Martin, Diana, Rebecca, Linda, Hilda, Friedrich...

The Alchemist
10-25-2011, 11:40 AM
male - Calogero
female - Catena
I hope not to be your daughter in my next life :D :D :D

Fra Baldracco
10-25-2011, 11:44 AM
I hope not to be your daughter in my next life :D :D :D

why??

catena means chain

Chains of love.:)