Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 44

Thread: Jomon mtDNA

  1. #31
    Veteran Member Hexachordia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:27 AM
    Location
    China
    Ethnicity
    East Asian
    Ancestry
    Zhuang/Chiwan
    Country
    China
    Age
    30
    Gender
    Posts
    1,158
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 399/61
    Given: 338/37

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ButlerKing View Post
    Lol, than we can also say Y-DNA genetic studies is not enough to determine the distribution of Turkic and Tajik Y-DNA, or even Russians because most of the times their samples was either only 30 to 60 which is far lower than ancient Yayoi samples.
    From wiki:
    The Yayoi period (弥生時代, Yayoi jidai?) is an Iron Age era in the history of Japan traditionally dated 300 BC to AD 300.[1] It is named after the neighborhood of Tokyo where archaeologists first uncovered artifacts and features from that era. Distinguishing characteristics of the Yayoi period include the appearance of new pottery styles and the start of an intensive rice agriculture in paddy fields. Techniques in metallurgy based on the use of bronze and iron were also introduced in this period. A hierarchical social class structure also emerged in this period. The Yayoi followed the Jōmon period (13,000400 BC) and Yayoi culture flourished in a geographic area from southern Kyūshū to northern Honshū.

    Yayoi people is loosely defined by new pottery cultures that emerged since 300BC, the problem left is to see, which mtdna is absent before 300 or 500BC, if none, yayoi people essentially shared the same mtdna with jomon and ainu. At least, the origin of yayoi is still not established historically, how can one say yayoi people genetically were absent from Japan before 300BC? Maybe they had been in Japan for some millania without distinguishing themself culturally. The cultural emergence of yayoi is not equal to physical emergence, the two may be several thousand years apart, and we can not be sure yet. After all the recent history of Yayoi is a new anthropological theory, not a recorded history, yayois genetic profile is to be misinterpreted by limited personal understanding of japanese history.

    [IMG][/IMG]

  2. #32
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Last Online
    02-19-2017 @ 07:37 AM
    Meta-Ethnicity
    British irish
    Ethnicity
    British
    Country
    England
    Gender
    Posts
    8,898
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 1,766/724
    Given: 54/57

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hexachordia View Post
    From wiki:
    The Yayoi period (弥生時代, Yayoi jidai?) is an Iron Age era in the history of Japan traditionally dated 300 BC to AD 300.[1] It is named after the neighborhood of Tokyo where archaeologists first uncovered artifacts and features from that era. Distinguishing characteristics of the Yayoi period include the appearance of new pottery styles and the start of an intensive rice agriculture in paddy fields. Techniques in metallurgy based on the use of bronze and iron were also introduced in this period. A hierarchical social class structure also emerged in this period. The Yayoi followed the Jōmon period (13,000–400 BC) and Yayoi culture flourished in a geographic area from southern Kyūshū to northern Honshū.

    Yayoi people is loosely defined by new pottery cultures that emerged since 300BC, the problem left is to see, which mtdna is absent before 300 or 500BC, if none, yayoi people essentially shared the same mtdna with jomon and ainu. At least, the origin of yayoi is still not established historically, how can one say yayoi people genetically were absent from Japan before 300BC? Maybe they had been in Japan for some millania without distinguishing themself culturally. The cultural emergence of yayoi is not equal to physical emergence, the two may be several thousand years apart, and we can not be sure yet. After all the recent history of Yayoi is a new anthropological theory, not a recorded history, yayois genetic profile is to be misinterpreted by limited personal understanding of japanese history.

    Maybe because they were Koreans who didn't have M7a? why do you think the genetics of Koreans and Japanese are so similar, they even look exactly the same.


    Facial reconstruction of Yayoi people. DNA of Yayoi is 100% most similar to Koreans being O2b and O3








  3. #33
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Last Online
    02-19-2017 @ 07:37 AM
    Meta-Ethnicity
    British irish
    Ethnicity
    British
    Country
    England
    Gender
    Posts
    8,898
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 1,766/724
    Given: 54/57

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

    Default

    Hexachordia, you seem to be interested as much as I am.

    I invite you to discuss in this thread which explains the racial features of Jomon and Ainu. They are really a fascinating race, a ancient Mongoloid so old and are the ones to survive, including the Taiwanese aborigines and Native Americans/Amerindians. The Taiwanese aborigines really do look like Amerindians.


    http://www.theapricity.com/forum/sho...milarity/page4

  4. #34
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Last Online
    02-20-2017 @ 08:28 AM
    Meta-Ethnicity
    Germanic, Celtic, Romance, Slavic
    Ethnicity
    european
    Country
    France
    Gender
    Posts
    493
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 105/13
    Given: 104/22

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

    Default

    haplogroup N9b is strongly related to Siberian haplogroup Y. Haplogroup M7a to haplogroup M7b (common in East Asia and Southwest Asia). In fact Jomon people were just Mongoloid people, they have nothing to do with Caucasians.

  5. #35
    Veteran Member Apricity Funding Member
    "Friend of Apricity"


    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Last Online
    02-18-2017 @ 04:01 AM
    Meta-Ethnicity
    Euro-Mutt
    Ethnicity
    European-Canadian
    Country
    Canada
    Y-DNA
    J2a
    mtDNA
    U5b2
    Religion
    Pagan
    Gender
    Posts
    5,498
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 5,334/137
    Given: 5,582/59

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

    Default

    So basically then modern day Japanese people are mainly a mixture between native Jomon people and Yayoi Neolithic farming migrants while the Ainu are now also mixed but have more Jomon DNA overall than ethnic Japanese correct?

  6. #36
    Banned
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Last Online
    12-18-2016 @ 01:09 AM
    Ethnicity
    Albanian
    Country
    Montenegro
    Y-DNA
    EV-13 Daco-Thracian
    Gender
    Posts
    345
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 163/15
    Given: 1/0

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

    Default

    Haplogroup D related to Jomon people should be well over 70% in Hokkaido and over 60% in the Tohoku regions, it was stated that Abe no Hirafu battled Emishi Jomon like people who were assimiliated to the Yamato society, while Hokkaido was rended familiar to the Yamato world in the 16th century, you can see 90% of toponyms in Hokkaido are in Ainu, despite the population has been Japanized

    Haplogroup O is well above 80% in Northern Kyushu and over 60% in the Nara plain, Shikoku and the initial Yamato territories.

    It is believed Yamato people came from China, crossed the Yangtze river and colonized initially Northern Kyushu and Nara plain where Yayou tombs were found

    HG O3 is common amongst Han Chinese but HG O2b1 is found only amongst Japanese and very few Koreans, standing at 22% in modern day Japan maybe it is the HG of the initial Yamato people

  7. #37
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Last Online
    02-19-2017 @ 07:37 AM
    Meta-Ethnicity
    British irish
    Ethnicity
    British
    Country
    England
    Gender
    Posts
    8,898
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 1,766/724
    Given: 54/57

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Murri View Post
    Haplogroup D related to Jomon people should be well over 70% in Hokkaido and over 60% in the Tohoku regions, it was stated that Abe no Hirafu battled Emishi Jomon like people who were assimiliated to the Yamato society, while Hokkaido was rended familiar to the Yamato world in the 16th century, you can see 90% of toponyms in Hokkaido are in Ainu, despite the population has been Japanized

    Haplogroup O is well above 80% in Northern Kyushu and over 60% in the Nara plain, Shikoku and the initial Yamato territories.

    It is believed Yamato people came from China, crossed the Yangtze river and colonized initially Northern Kyushu and Nara plain where Yayou tombs were found

    HG O3 is common amongst Han Chinese but HG O2b1 is found only amongst Japanese and very few Koreans, standing at 22% in modern day Japan maybe it is the HG of the initial Yamato people

    Haplogroup D2 in Tohaku regions is 39% last time I checked but not sure about Hokkaido. There is estimated 200,000 assimilated Ainu who became Yamato in Hokkaido. If Hokkaido really have such high D2 this proves again that Y-DNA really make up a very small percentage of your overall DNA. Jomon mtDNA in Hokkaido Yamato is 37%.

    Hokkaido Yamato people have 70% Jomon Y-DNA and 37% Jomon mtDNA and Kyrgyz have 63% R1a and 43% Caucasian mtDNA yet the Hokkaido people look far more Mongoloid than Kyrgyz, in fact they look no different to Chinese and Koreans.

    Compare this Indian women on the right will all of them.

    Last edited by ButlerKing; 09-17-2016 at 01:26 AM.

  8. #38
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Last Online
    Today @ 03:43 AM
    Ethnicity
    mixed
    Country
    Canada
    Gender
    Posts
    276
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 90/4
    Given: 125/0

    1 Not allowed! Not allowed!

    Default

    Here is anthropology map, which explains the relationship among manchuria, korean, yayoi, kofun and jomon.




    see the gene pool map by chinese scholar(2011) together



    And Razib Khan's comment
    The connections between coastal southern Korea and the western islands of Japan are well known. It seems like that the Yayoi people, who probably contributed the preponderance of the ancestry of modern Japanese, arrived in Kyushu approximate ~2,500 years ago. And were originally a group within the Korean peninsula. Over the past 2,000 years Korea has gone through a process of ethnic-linguistic homogenization during the ethnogenesis of the modern Korean nation, but it seems possible that the original group(s) which gave rise to the Yayoi existed in southern Korea to facilitate contact between the islands and the peninsula into the historical era.
    Last edited by johen; 09-17-2016 at 01:57 AM.

  9. #39
    Banned
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Last Online
    12-18-2016 @ 01:09 AM
    Ethnicity
    Albanian
    Country
    Montenegro
    Y-DNA
    EV-13 Daco-Thracian
    Gender
    Posts
    345
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 163/15
    Given: 1/0

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

    Default

    In the Tohoku region since Abe no Hirafu's expedition the Emishi of the local area, Mutsu, Dewa and as far as Kanto plain were heavily assimiliated into Yamato society and they started using Japanese names and surnames, many Japanese records speak of Tohoku and partially Kanto plain people being 90% assimiliated local emishi, carriers of D2

    Hokkaido was firstly settled by an O2 carriet Yamato clan called Matsumae, after the Meji restoration it is stated that 70%+ of the population are nothing else but japanized Ainu who took Japanese names and surnames.

    Despite being changed in the last century 80% of the toponyms in Hokkaido are in Ainu language, Sapporo the largest city of the island is one, you have many Ainu based language toponyms in Tohoku and upper Kanto too.

  10. #40
    Banned
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Last Online
    12-18-2016 @ 01:09 AM
    Ethnicity
    Albanian
    Country
    Montenegro
    Y-DNA
    EV-13 Daco-Thracian
    Gender
    Posts
    345
    Thumbs Up/Down
    Received: 163/15
    Given: 1/0

    0 Not allowed! Not allowed!

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by johen View Post
    Here is anthropology map, which explains the relationship among manchuria, korean, yayoi, kofun and jomon.




    see the gene pool map by chinese scholar(2011) together



    And Razib Khan's comment
    A theory places the Yayoi in Southern China and not in Korea, after invasions these people cross the Yangtzee river and initially arrive in northern Kyushu, eradicating the Jomon completely and later move into Nara and north-central Shikoku establishing the initial Yamato territories.

    HG O2b1 is present in 24% of Japanese males and only 8% of Korean males, this HG is totally absent in Chinese, Manchu or other East Asian populations, many scholars link O2b1 to the Yayoi who founded Yamato state.

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 12
    Last Post: 09-04-2016, 10:55 PM
  2. Strong Jomon look in Japanese people.
    By ButlerKing in forum Anthropology
    Replies: 89
    Last Post: 08-04-2015, 06:57 AM
  3. Facial reconstruction of Jomon (ancestors of Ainu)
    By ButlerKing in forum Anthropology
    Replies: 68
    Last Post: 03-05-2015, 05:50 PM
  4. Replies: 28
    Last Post: 05-21-2013, 10:46 AM
  5. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 12-01-2012, 12:18 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •