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Horka Ozul
11-11-2009, 06:00 PM
I am just curious what are the opinions about them?

Tabiti
11-11-2009, 06:01 PM
One of our closest nations in Europe. I really like and respect your people and country.
Despite that language thing, we are quite similar, believe me.

Jamt
11-11-2009, 06:07 PM
Good people and congratulations to the Jobbik EU-election results.

Eldritch
11-11-2009, 06:07 PM
The Hungarians are a brave and proud people, whom the rest of Europe has much to to be thankful to.

Horka Ozul
11-11-2009, 06:13 PM
One of our closest nations in Europe. I really like and respect your people and country.
Despite that language thing, we are quite similar, believe me.

Well both some hungarian tribes and bulgarians lived together in Baskiria, therefore I believe that the lost bulgarian language might have been strongly related to the language hungarians speak today. I pity very much that bulgarians left their original language for a south slavic one. How do you feel about this thing?

Svarog
11-11-2009, 06:16 PM
They're cool I guess, I even dated couple of them and some of the best friends are Hungarians or half and a half, tho, as long as I hear I live on their stolen territory and should move out I won't be able to embrace them as my brothers or whatever, but it is more of a politic.

Not very friendly relation of our countries don't make it easy to answer this question without thinking 'I'll say i like them while they hate me, or I'll say I don't like them while they like me' etc

People are just people, some are bad, some are nice, bad ones do the politics and screw the nice ones.

Horka Ozul
11-11-2009, 06:17 PM
The Hungarians are a brave and proud people, whom the rest of Europe has much to to be thankful to.

From what I learned Finns thought of hungarians as a role model in the times when they were struggling for independence, seeing them through the allegedly "finno-ugric" common ancestry as a model for national freedom. Today I see that many hungarians look at Finland as a model for how to have a clean, moral and mature society.

Sally
11-11-2009, 06:19 PM
I like their food; hooray for paprika and goulash! I am also a fan of Hungarian films.

Ulf
11-11-2009, 06:19 PM
My ignorance won't let me vote that I admire them, but I do like them. Now I'm off to read up about Hungarians.

Tabiti
11-11-2009, 06:20 PM
Well both some hungarian tribes and bulgarians lived together in Baskiria, therefore I believe that the lost bulgarian language might have been strongly related to the language hungarians speak today. I pity very much that bulgarians left their original language for a south slavic one. How do you feel about this thing?
It was more due religious reasons, since the main purpose of Cyrilic was to spread the Orthodox christianity. We, as one of the first major Orthodox christian countries often led missionaries in the so called Slavic lands. Our language was also strongly russophilized after 19th century, when they "made" the so called official language. Tzarist Russia took part in our liberation, so the presence of russophilism was reasonable back then. However, we still have different grammar. The original Bulgarian language did not disappear, only melt in the past, being "modernized".
But as I know your Runic letter is read right to left. Our is read left to right. There are also differences in some symbols.

Loddfafner
11-11-2009, 06:24 PM
I only spent a few days there and should go back to give Hungarians another chance. My impression was negative: in comparison with other European peoples they are less patient with foreigners who don't speak their language and more likely to cheat them.

Horka Ozul
11-11-2009, 06:26 PM
It was more due religious reasons, since the main purpose of Cyrilic was to spread the Orthodox christianity. We, as one of the first major Orthodox christian countries often led missionaries in the so called Slavic lands. Our language was also strongly russophilized after 19th century, when they "made" the so called official language. Tzarist Russia took part in our liberation, so the presence of russophilism was reasonable back then. However, we still have different grammar. The original Bulgarian language did not disappear, only melt in the past, being "modernized".
But as I know your Runic letter is read right to left. Our is read left to right. There are also differences in some symbols.

Of course there are differences, since magyars and bulgars were similar people, with strong tribal ties, but with own specific culture and language, but which I don't think was that different (maybe as the closure between the Dutch and the German languages). Do you have some links about remains of the old bulgar language? I am much interested in this.

Tabiti
11-11-2009, 06:27 PM
in comparison with other European peoples they are less patient with foreigners who don't speak their language and more likely to cheat them.
I think that's a good trait in whole that Euro multicultural atmosphere today. Not begging at you because you're a foreigner (American) doesn't mean they want to cheat you.

P.S. I haven't noticed such thing.

Mesrine
11-11-2009, 06:27 PM
Steppe niggers. :p

Svarog
11-11-2009, 06:28 PM
I only spent a few days there and should go back to give Hungarians another chance. My impression was negative: in comparison with other European peoples they are less patient with foreigners who don't speak their language and more likely to cheat them.

I go to Hungary fairly often, at least I did, it's cheaper so we go and get stock supplies, they are unlikely to cheat - a truth story - I bought something in a store, and did not take my change, I left it to the girl that works there, when she realized she run after me screaming in the street to give me my change back, and did not want to take it even after i explained it's for her so i doubt they are likely to mug you

About the language - very true, they don't do English (actually, the country I had the hardest time communicating) well and can be very impatient even rude, but nothing that I did not already experienced in Greece or France too.

Tabiti
11-11-2009, 06:29 PM
Of course there are differences, since magyars and bulgars were similar people, with strong tribal ties, but with own specific culture and language, but which I don't think was that different (maybe as the closure between the Dutch and the German languages). Do you have some links about remains of the old bulgar language? I am much interested in this.
Check this site:
http://groznijat.tripod.com/pb_lang/index.html
Unfortunately, there isn't many translated information.

Horka Ozul
11-11-2009, 06:33 PM
I only spent a few days there and should go back to give Hungarians another chance. My impression was negative: in comparison with other European peoples they are less patient with foreigners who don't speak their language and more likely to cheat them.

Of course because of total linguistically isolation, hungarians have a hard time on learning any foreign language to them. I would say that this lack of interest in anything foreign is a negative aspect of us. We like to know what is happening in our own little world, but we are not very interested to open ourselves to other people. As about the cheating thing, I think that's an exaggerated judging towards the general hungarians. By contrary when I visit Hungary (me being from Transylvania) I always seem to be amazed how polite and fair they behave with the costumers. I think you were unfortunate when you were cheated, cheating I assure you is not a "hungarian thing" ;)

Tabiti
11-11-2009, 06:36 PM
Most young people I saw knew English or German. It's the same here. Older ones know only Russian, for example. You can "blame" the school system for that.
And after all is knowing a foreign language just to serve "god chosen" tourists from Western countries so positive national trait at all?

Loddfafner
11-11-2009, 06:37 PM
I go to Hungary fairly often, at least I did, it's cheaper so we go and get stock supplies, they are unlikely to cheat - a truth story - I bought something in a store, and did not take my change, I left it to the girl that works there, when she realized she run after me screaming in the street to give me my change back, and did not want to take it even after i explained it's for her so i doubt they are likely to mug you


This is good to hear, as my own experience may not be representative. In several countries, I would hold out my hand with the change for the shopkeeper to select the correct coins. In Prague and in Romania, the shopkeepers were honest. In Budapest, they would pick out the high value coins.

Budapest has some confusing policies about which subway tickets are valid. The guards seemed to use them deliberately to catch and fine bewildered travelers. In Hungary and Slovakia, train conductors would look for minor irregularities in tickets and use those to extract bribes.



About the language - very true, they don't do English (actually, the country I had the hardest time communicating) well and can be very impatient even rude, but nothing that I did not already experienced in Greece or France too.

The French can reasonably expect a foreigner to have a clue about their language. That is a bit much for Hungarians, although I did try to learn some rudimentary Magyar.

Horka Ozul
11-11-2009, 06:38 PM
Steppe niggers. :p

Hope you are not serious over this remark :rolleyes:, but even if you meant it as a joke, it is still very offending.

Mesrine
11-11-2009, 06:39 PM
Hope you are not serious over this remark :rolleyes:, but even if you meant it as a joke, it is still very offending.

How so?

Svarog
11-11-2009, 06:40 PM
And after all is knowing a foreign language just to serve "god chosen" tourists from Western countries so positive national trait at all?

Well, knowing a foreign language is not really JUST because of the tourism, as, you'll wish to travel too and there is nothing worse then finding yourself in ignorance of any kind, like, being in the foreign country without knowing the language.

Whenever I go to some new country I care to learn basic words so I can at least start a conversation in their language to show some respect, nor I am showing a middle finger and saying fuck you in my language to someone who cannot understand it and comes here - there is nothing embarrassing or lack of national pride in that really.

Some French will refuse to speak English to you even if they know it, it happened to me - I don't think they are showing any patriotism or national pride in that, just being an asses.

Tabiti
11-11-2009, 06:40 PM
No one cheated me in Romania or Hungary, nor tried. Maybe because I look like "local"?

It depends when you were to those countries.

Horka Ozul
11-11-2009, 06:41 PM
The French can reasonably expect a foreigner to have a clue about their language. That is a bit much for Hungarians, although I did try to learn some rudimentary Magyar.

And how did that go? I presume you became quite discouraged from the first try :D

Óttar
11-11-2009, 06:45 PM
I honestly don't know much about them or their country. Pan-Turanists would try to claim them as their own along with Finns.

Loddfafner
11-11-2009, 06:46 PM
And how did that go? I presume you became quite discouraged from the first try :D

Exactly. I don't remember any of it any more. I resorted to pointing to random items on menus and writing down my requests at train station ticket booths.

Eldritch
11-11-2009, 06:50 PM
I honestly don't know much about them or their country. Pan-Turanists would try to claim them as their own along with Finns.

Yeah, as well as the Japanese. :rolleyes:

Horka Ozul
11-11-2009, 06:51 PM
How so?

Are you serious? You can't even realize why I find you words offending? I know I'm new over here, and I don't like to judge people I don't know, but your question is as shallow as a puddle.

Allenson
11-11-2009, 07:03 PM
I haven't had a whole lot of experience with Hungarians but the little bit that I have has been quite positive. One of my good friend's mother is Hungarian and she is a very sweet lady and I even dated a Hugarian girl for a short spell a few years back. She still lives in the area and we bump into each other once with a while. I always enjoy our conversations over coffee at the bookstore. :coffee:

She's becoming New Englandized though--she wears checkered flannel wools now and makes maple syrup. ;)

Mesrine
11-11-2009, 07:05 PM
Are you serious? You can't even realize why I find you words offending? I know I'm new over here, and I don't like to judge people I don't know, but your question is as shallow as a puddle.

It's still a question, so answer it instead of acting like an offended pussy. What is so offending in being jokingly called (smiley, man) a "steppe nigger"?

BTW, I learned this expression from another Hungarian member, Augustus Khan. Seems he has more humour than you.

The Lawspeaker
11-11-2009, 07:11 PM
I don't know all that much about Hungarians but what I do know makes me want to learn more about them. What I have seen on TV about Budapest, 1956, the Hungarian (both classical as folk) culture seems interesting enough.

Me, being Western European and raised at the very end of the Cold War, was always under the that Hungary would be much like it's neighbors but after reading a bit about them I realized that they are actually very different from them.

Óttar
11-11-2009, 07:24 PM
Horka, why don't you give us a summary of Hungary and its people? It seems not many people here know much about Hungary.

Osweo
11-11-2009, 07:31 PM
I knew a great middle aged Magyar working in Moscow. Ferenc's ultimate aim in life was to retire to a fine house by a vinyard, and stride out naked among his vines in the morning sun every day... :thumbs

Apart from him, the Hungarians on the net have been hilarious. Where is good old 'Pro-Alpine'?!? :cry2

Svarog
11-11-2009, 07:32 PM
and stride out naked

the thing that many Hungarians have looks like :P

Tony
11-11-2009, 07:43 PM
I so like the Hungarians , above all Cicciolina :D
nevermind Horka I like to joke , seriously I admire your volk , you've been throu a lot of strives , the Turks , the jew Bolshevick Bela Kun , the commies , uhhh dude but finally you made it :thumb001::coffee:

Eldritch
11-11-2009, 07:45 PM
the thing that many Hungarians have looks like :P

See? We are Finns and Magyars are related after all. I like to stroll naked in the snow in midwinter after the sauna.

Horka Ozul
11-11-2009, 08:31 PM
I so like the Hungarians , above all Cicciolina :D
nevermind Horka I like to joke , seriously I admire your volk , you've been throu a lot of strives , the Turks , the jew Bolshevick Bela Kun , the commies , uhhh dude but finally you made it :thumb001::coffee:

Not quite. Until we have by foreign interest playing both governing and opposition parties dictating the tempo in our parliament we still aren't free people. When the government in current days, weeks and months is conducting a witch hunt against patriots, and is locking them into prison for fabricated terrorist activity, I can certainly say we haven't made it. But I have a feeling that 2010 will bring a well deserved wind of change for us :thumb001:

Horka Ozul
11-11-2009, 08:53 PM
Horka, why don't you give us a summary of Hungary and its people? It seems not many people here know much about Hungary.

It's hard to construct a summary, when we as a nation, otherwise as any other nation, are so complex. But I should say we love to be free, we are very stubborn, always in a mood for an uprising. We are very connected to cultural values, the current population has a very strong Christian-civic tradition, and we have one of the most extended middle classes in all Europe (we lack very wealthy people). We produce very good wine, also have the extra-strong palinka drink. We are the masters of spicy food, and our gastronomy is very unhealthy, that's why our mortality rate is among the highest in Europe. We love to preserve our ancestor's traditions, there a several hundreds of groups focused on Medieval Hungary revivalism. Also we have some very beautiful and diverse folk music (Europe meets Asia in perfect harmony). We are also very melancholic people, who could celebrate even in our nation's disastrous moments, pessimism being also strongly our characteristics. We can also collapse and disarm totally after we had a successful period (especially in sporting events). We take pride in our uniqueness which starts with our language and ends in our sudden behavior changes (from one moment being calm and hopeless, the other moment we unite with each other and are able to realize big things, up-rise and devastate with fury). We usually take a lot of BS, but we never forget the wrong doings against us, and without any announcing we have the power to strike back viciously, even to our own surprise. I think this is enough for now.

Treffie
11-11-2009, 11:16 PM
Are you serious? You can't even realize why I find you words offending? I know I'm new over here, and I don't like to judge people I don't know, but your question is as shallow as a puddle.

Don't worry, it's called humour - as in sheepshagger (pertaining to the Welsh) :p

As for myself, never met a Hungarian.

Absinthe
11-11-2009, 11:22 PM
Awesome language, Nyilaskeresztes Párt, and horseback archery? Fuck yeah!! :thumbs

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/b/be/Lajos-kassai-hba.jpg

Óttar
11-11-2009, 11:54 PM
Awesome language, Nyilaskeresztes Párt, and horseback archery? Fuck yeah!! :thumbs

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/b/be/Lajos-kassai-hba.jpg
With Hunnish bows and Central Asian ponies? ;)

Absinthe
11-11-2009, 11:58 PM
With Hunnish bows and Central Asian ponies? ;)
Why not? Kassai Lajos is a legend...his school has even a Greek branch (http://www.horsebackarcherygr.com/) (of which I am a founding member, without ever have done the sport -don't ask :p) :thumbs

Tabiti
11-12-2009, 08:03 AM
One thing I don't like it's the cheap wine mixed with coke, which youth drinks in Hungary.:D
Other fact made me uneasy was kissing for greeting, even between males. Here only old ladies and close female friends do that...But better not to try kissing a guy if you're male;)

Italians I've met were from the same "friendly kissing" type.

Amarantine
11-12-2009, 09:01 AM
I like them but I think they don't like us (mean on ex Yu, Orthodox).

asulf
11-12-2009, 09:47 AM
I know those people are affable, and very pleasant to be around my family name makes them smile ...
_ the Austro Hungarian Empire is for something.:D

Horka Ozul
11-12-2009, 05:29 PM
I like them but I think they don't like us (mean on ex Yu, Orthodox).

You are right, hungarians generally never liked Yugoslavia, it just centered to much influence in this region, and Hungary always seen a strong rival in Yugoslavia. As for ex-Yugo states there is affinity for croatians, while besides serbs who are not seen very favorable by magyars (no, serbs are not hated, only they don't have a too favorable image among hungarians), the rest of the ex-Yugo states are treated neutrally, hungarians know very few things about these smaller states, and they don't bother with them (they don't bother with any foreign countries matter of fact).

anonymaus
11-12-2009, 05:33 PM
I've only ever had good experiences with Hungarians, from friends and friends of the family to teachers and the like; when growing up we frequented a Hungarian tavern here in the city, run by two brothers and their families, who treated us like family. They constantly insisted on giving me money and sweets when we visited--who could dislike such people? ;)

Horka Ozul
11-12-2009, 05:34 PM
One thing I don't like it's the cheap wine mixed with coke, which youth drinks in Hungary.:D
Other fact made me uneasy was kissing for greeting, even between males. Here only old ladies and close female friends do that...But better not to try kissing a guy if you're male;)

Italians I've met were from the same "friendly kissing" type.

You are right, that hungarians tend to greet a family member or a friend with kissing their cheeks, but the younger generation practices this less and less than the older one. You will never see two buddies greet each other by kissing each others' cheeks, even though in villages older men may still practice this habit.

Guapo
11-12-2009, 05:37 PM
As for ex-Yugo states there is affinity for croatians, while besides serbs who are not seen very favorable by magyars (no, serbs are not hated, only they don't have a too favorable image among hungarians)

My wife is ethnic Hungarian and she doesn't speak a word. She could also care less about patriotism/nationalism, whatever.

Svarog
11-12-2009, 05:41 PM
Ywhile besides serbs who are not seen very favorable by magyars (no, serbs are not hated, only they don't have a too favorable image among hungarians)

That's the part of being one (a Serb) :D

I would feel almost disappointed to hear otherwise :p

Aemma
11-12-2009, 07:18 PM
I got to know a bit about Hungary earlier on this year when I befriended Arrow Cross another fine Hungarian member here. What little I know about your country and its people I do like very much though. :) Really, I've never met a Hungarian person I've never liked. :)

I remember when I was growing up, I used to babysit a young girl whose family was Hungarian. The gentleman was a widower. His kids were fully Canadianised--his older ones were my contemporaries--and I doubt they knew much if any of their father's language. I remember walking into their home and feeling like I was somewhere else in the world, what with the lovely furniture, the comforting smells of food in the house (yes they even had sausages hanging on their kitchen door :)), the homey knick-knacks and family pictures that gave a sense of deep, far-reaching roots from far away....it all left me with a sense of the near-familiar far-away (if that makes any sense)--Europeanness or what I felt would be Old World Europe. It was nice. They were a very nice family too.

We also had a long time ago a fine restaurant in downtown Ottawa called The Little Hungarian Village. I was 15 and some girlfriends and I set out on the town to meet for dinner and some drinks (back in the day when you could be 15 and "pass for" being 19 without any problems :D). They made some of the best food I have ever eaten in my life. They don't exist here anymore unfortunately. :( Too bad.

But anyway, all this to say, I echo what Oulfie said a few pages ago...time for me to read up on your fine country and its people too. :)

Cheers!...Aemma :)

Horka Ozul
11-12-2009, 09:06 PM
I got to know a bit about Hungary earlier on this year when I befriended Arrow Cross another fine Hungarian member here. What little I know about your country and its people I do like very much though. :) Really, I've never met a Hungarian person I've never liked. :)

I remember when I was growing up, I used to babysit a young girl whose family was Hungarian. The gentleman was a widower. His kids were fully Canadianised--his older ones were my contemporaries--and I doubt they knew much if any of their father's language. I remember walking into their home and feeling like I was somewhere else in the world, what with the lovely furniture, the comforting smells of food in the house (yes they even had sausages hanging on their kitchen door :)), the homey knick-knacks and family pictures that gave a sense of deep, far-reaching roots from far away....it all left me with a sense of the near-familiar far-away (if that makes any sense)--Europeanness or what I felt would be Old World Europe. It was nice. They were a very nice family too.

We also had a long time ago a fine restaurant in downtown Ottawa called The Little Hungarian Village. I was 15 and some girlfriends and I set out on the town to meet for dinner and some drinks (back in the day when you could be 15 and "pass for" being 19 without any problems :D). They made some of the best food I have ever eaten in my life. They don't exist here anymore unfortunately. :( Too bad.

But anyway, all this to say, I echo what Oulfie said a few pages ago...time for me to read up on your fine country and its people too. :)

Cheers!...Aemma :)

Unfortunately is a fact that at least half of hungarians who migrate to the U.S., Canada, Australia don't teach the unique hungarian language to their children who get to be born in these countries, the correct explanation and the reason for this is totally beyond me, but I think also other Europeans have the same assimilation proportions as hungarians have. Unfortunately arabics, east asiatics are way more conservative in preserving their mother culture, that's why they are omnipresent in these countries, while you can barely hear anything about hungarians, romanians, ukrainians, spanish, finns, etc., might be doing in North America.

Loki
11-12-2009, 10:42 PM
Hungarians are an interesting people. I had a Hungarian girlfriend in the period 2000 - 2001. I also travelled to Hungary during that time, met her family and friends. I even contemplated the possibility of settling there. However, in the end I could not get myself to do it. The cultural differences were too big for me -- being used to the British Commonwealth way of life. And there is something about the Hungarian tendency to be depressed for life that didn't appeal to me. Hungarians usually have a pessimistic outlook on life, and this was one of the major reasons why I could not fit in there.

I voted for "I like them".

Horka Ozul
11-13-2009, 06:24 PM
Hungarians are an interesting people. I had a Hungarian girlfriend in the period 2000 - 2001. I also travelled to Hungary during that time, met her family and friends. I even contemplated the possibility of settling there. However, in the end I could not get myself to do it. The cultural differences were too big for me -- being used to the British Commonwealth way of life. And there is something about the Hungarian tendency to be depressed for life that didn't appeal to me. Hungarians usually have a pessimistic outlook on life, and this was one of the major reasons why I could not fit in there.

I voted for "I like them".

Well this chronic depression of hungarians is some sort of myth in my opinion, I know many hungarians in Transylvania and they really don't seem to be very depressed, or more depressed than romanians from here. I don't necessarily think that having a quiet and calm temper means automatically that you are suffering from depression, by contrary, I believe you "suffer" from normal and mature behavior.

Manifest Destiny
11-13-2009, 06:42 PM
I've only known two Hungarians: The guy who married my aunt and the guy's mother. They are both intelligent, hard-working upstanding people.

Jeef
11-13-2009, 07:01 PM
A wonderful, proud people! :thumb001:

Svipdag
11-13-2009, 10:20 PM
Truth to tell, I don't. I'm almost ashamed to admit that I have never known a Hungarian, or even met one. :embarrassed:

One thing I do know about them is that during the "cold war" and afterward, they made wonderful LP records of unusual mediaeval, baroque, and classical music. I have a number of fine Hungaroton records in my collection, which I esteem highly.

Bari
11-13-2009, 11:03 PM
I happen to know a few Hungarians. Great people. Interesting history and culture as well as their language(which is impossible to understand).

Horka Ozul
11-14-2009, 12:00 AM
Truth to tell, I don't. I'm almost ashamed to admit that I have never known a Hungarian, or even met one. :embarrassed:

One thing I do know about them is that during the "cold war" and afterward, they made wonderful LP records of unusual mediaeval, baroque, and classical music. I have a number of fine Hungaroton records in my collection, which I esteem highly.

Hungaroton was really one of the finest record labels in the '70s and '80s, many wonderful and exciting music they put out. Could you give me some of the names of the artists you have in your collection? Maybe I will find out about great hungarian artists even myself never heard about (and I am quite a music collector).

Loxias
11-14-2009, 12:17 AM
I like them, one of the best sounding languages to my ears. But otherwise I wouldn't say I know them that well.

Guapo
11-14-2009, 02:10 AM
A wonderful, proud people! :thumb001:

I am proud of Zoltán Dani. Dani lives in Serbia and enjoys his bakery business. I have great respect for Dani`s loyalty to people with whom he shares his everyday life.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/87/Zoltan_Dani.jpg



Zoltán Dani is a former colonel of the Yugoslav Army and former commander of the 3rd battery of the 250th Missile Brigade, which shot down an F-117 Nighthawk near the village of Buđanovci on March 27, 1999, during the Kosovo War. The hit was achieved with modified SA-3 Goa missiles.

Dani claimed that his battery also shot down an F-16[1] which according to NATO was lost due to "mechanical failure".

Since retiring from military service, Dani has been working as a baker in his native village Skorenovac. He is an ethnic Hungarian.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tOCHjOxR2SQ

Svipdag
11-14-2009, 02:35 AM
Alas,

My collection is in chaos. It was put into storage while the inside of my house was being painted. Some of it has never been unpacked and none of the rest is properly arranged. In short, I don't know where anything is.

Arrow Cross
11-14-2009, 01:01 PM
And there is something about the Hungarian tendency to be depressed for life that didn't appeal to me. Hungarians usually have a pessimistic outlook on life, and this was one of the major reasons why I could not fit in there.
That actually has some truth in it, but participating in so many conflicts through history - due to our location - and losing so many of them certainly had something to do with it. All that sorrow, both national and personal, and especially in the XXth Century, has imprinted itself on the national spirit, and pushed the outlook of the common man more and more pessimistic and cynical.

...Which may also be reflected in our ways of humour. :p

Horka Ozul
11-14-2009, 02:15 PM
That actually has some truth in it, but participating in so many conflicts through history - due to our location - and losing so many of them certainly had something to do with it. All that sorrow, both national and personal, and especially in the XXth Century, has imprinted itself on the national spirit, and pushed the outlook of the common man more and more pessimistic and cynical.

...Which may also be reflected in our ways of humour. :p

Let's not exaggerate, we haven't lost more battles and wars than other European countries, still we had way more victories than defeats.

Arrow Cross
11-14-2009, 02:42 PM
Let's not exaggerate, we haven't lost more battles and wars than other European countries, still we had way more victories than defeats.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungarian_Revolution_of_1848
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_I
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_II
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungarian_Revolution_of_1956

Too much of a good thing in a too short time, wouldn't you agree? What we won and didn't win many centuries ago is of little relevance on the topic.

Loki
11-14-2009, 02:48 PM
I have this book, a tongue-in-cheek account of Hungarians. Even though it is humorous and exaggerated, there is a little truth in it:

http://www.ovalbooks.com/xeno/Hungarians.html

The Xenophobe's Guide to the Hungarians

by Miklós Vámos and Mátyás Sárközi

A guide to understanding the Hungarians that explores their underlying character traits and idiosyncracies.

Extracts from the book:


Two plus two equals five

Although they hate to criticise themselves, Hungarians are well aware of their faults, one of which is that they never see eye to eye: if there are four Hungarians in a room, they will belong to five different political parties.

Gloom and doom

With Hungarians, pessimism is a state of mind. They are happy to cultivate this gloomy view: as they put it, 'An optimist is a person who is poorly informed'. Hungarians are realists: in their folk-tales they live happily 'until they die', not happily 'ever after'.

Divorce Hungarian style

Statistics show that Hungarians divorce more than they marry. On an average day, 300 Hungarians marry, and, at the same time, 100 divorce (hopefully not from the 300 who marry). Zsa Zsa Gabor accounts for at least eight. She was once asked whether she was a good housekeeper. 'Yes, dahling,' she said, 'Very good. Every time I divorce I keep the house.'

Talent will out

Hungarian emigrants are very proud of their small native land and of what they themselves have achieved. There was a period in Hollywood when a sign on film studio doors read: 'It's not enough to be Hungarian, you also have to have some talent.'

Majar
11-14-2009, 03:34 PM
I like Hungarians a lot. :nod

You can't get a good feeling of the people and culture if you stay in the capital and only surf the tourist traps. The Hungarian countryside is beautiful and the people there are much nicer than in Budapest.

Horka Ozul
11-14-2009, 04:09 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungarian_Revolution_of_1848
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_I
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_II
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungarian_Revolution_of_1956

Too much of a good thing in a too short time, wouldn't you agree? What we won and didn't win many centuries ago is of little relevance on the topic.

We lost in the final, but we won many battles in these wars, and always morally we won: in 1849 our independence fight was the longest and harshest in all Europe, finally our upper classes got in contact with our lower classes, which was essential for the strengthening of our nation; in WWI we managed to keep the lands of today's Hungary, even if we were attacked from all directions almost, and only because of our strong will and courage there exists a Hungary today, don't forget that both Romania, Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia wanted to share among themselves all the millenarian Hungary; in WWII we kept our primal promise intact, to be allies of Germany until the end, thus not acting cowardly as other Axis allies did, by turning on the Allied side when the war wasn't going as to the plans of the Third Reich; in 1956 we were the first country that upraised against the communist bastards, giving a beautiful example to the world of sacrifice for freedom and for the independence of the mother land. Contrary to you I don't see decisive tragedies in these events, only the path of suffering which our nation has to bare until justice will be served to it (to romanticize a little, Divine justice will be served to Hungary :)).

Arrow Cross
11-14-2009, 04:29 PM
That's a very admirable way of perceiving the past, but you see, it's always easier to moan about our plagues and misfortunes than to look into the future with productive hope and optimism. :p

Hrolf Kraki
11-14-2009, 05:19 PM
I find them to be a very fascinating people. This also holds true with their language. Uralic languages interest me since they don't have the same language roots as we (Indo-Europeans). I'd like to read more about the Huns and the history of the Hungarian people. Can anyone suggest any good books on the topic? The only Hungarian I know in real life is one of my German professors and he's a really nice guy.

Horka Ozul
11-14-2009, 08:27 PM
I find them to be a very fascinating people. This also holds true with their language. Uralic languages interest me since they don't have the same language roots as we (Indo-Europeans). I'd like to read more about the Huns and the history of the Hungarian people. Can anyone suggest any good books on the topic? The only Hungarian I know in real life is one of my German professors and he's a really nice guy.

Sometimes it's good to read a critical point of view over a nation's history, however generally many official hungarian historians (serving the globalists) lie deliberately about our genesis portraying us in unfavorable manners, on the other side the romantic-nationalist historians portray our beginnings in a too favorable manner. It's hard to find a book that brings an equilibrium between the two. A good site which has well written books about the history of Hungary in english is http://www.hungarian-history.hu/lib/index.htm

Osweo
11-15-2009, 09:55 PM
always morally we won: ... in WWII we kept our primal promise intact, to be allies of Germany until the end, thus not acting cowardly as other Axis allies did,
Hmm, you know, I already stated my positive impression, but I feel bound to repeat what my Ukrainian ex-almost-mother-in-law shared with me once. She was very young in the war, but her parents told her all about it, and it seems that Hungarians were stationed to occupy Sumiiskaya Oblast in the northern central part of Ukraine. She told me that the German officers behaved like gentlemen, but that the Hungarians were rather brutal towards the villagers... :suomut:

Horka Ozul
11-15-2009, 10:27 PM
Hmm, you know, I already stated my positive impression, but I feel bound to repeat what my Ukrainian ex-almost-mother-in-law shared with me once. She was very young in the war, but her parents told her all about it, and it seems that Hungarians were stationed to occupy Sumiiskaya Oblast in the northern central part of Ukraine. She told me that the German officers behaved like gentlemen, but that the Hungarians were rather brutal towards the villagers... :suomut:

There were cases and cases, cannot portray all hungarian military as inhuman brutes.

Osweo
11-15-2009, 10:45 PM
There were cases and cases, cannot portray all hungarian military as inhuman brutes.
You would hope so. But I can't help wondering that they'd been taught about 1848 in a way rather unsympathetic to the ordinary Russian people, instead of just the Tsar' and his ministers. :(
I'm just saying you shouldn't overidealise your fellow nationals in the dirty times of the 20th Century.

Germanicus
11-15-2009, 10:49 PM
You would hope so. But I can't help wondering that they'd been taught about 1848 in a way rather unsympathetic to the ordinary Russian people, instead of just the Tsar' and his ministers. :(
I'm just saying you shouldn't overidealise your fellow nationals in the dirty times of the 20th Century.

War is war, it brings out the savagery of man. Whatever conflict the beast shows it's head, and history remdembers him for it.

Horka Ozul
11-16-2009, 05:26 PM
You would hope so. But I can't help wondering that they'd been taught about 1848 in a way rather unsympathetic to the ordinary Russian people, instead of just the Tsar' and his ministers. :(
I'm just saying you shouldn't overidealise your fellow nationals in the dirty times of the 20th Century.

Have I been doing that, overpraising the hungarian military activities in 20th century :confused:. Anyway Hungary had its beautiful victories and humiliating losses through the 20th century, I don't reckon I idealized things not historically valid. Let's not argue senselessly ;)

Lulletje Rozewater
11-17-2009, 12:48 PM
Steppe niggers. :p

Don't let Attila hear you.:)

He made mince meat of the Romance.:thumbs up

Loddfafner
11-18-2009, 10:52 PM
I want to change my vote to negative. I am working on a bottle of Bulls Blood from Eger and am already regretting it.

Idun
11-19-2009, 11:05 AM
To little ethnic identity and definition, in other words very mixed. Too many Roma people there, too, I think.

Arrow Cross
11-19-2009, 01:00 PM
To little ethnic identity and definition, in other words very mixed.
False, on the contary, ethnic and national identity is very strong here, even if the people's genetical origins who identify as such may differ (not too much, mind you). This is a crossroad of Europe.


Too many Roma people there, too, I think.
~5-7%, and they are the only visible minority; certainly less than in most neighbouring countries and certainly less than the Africans and Muslims of you Northern- and Western Europeans. :p

Monolith
11-19-2009, 04:49 PM
I haven't met many Magyars, but I guess they're OK. They speak a totally incomprehensible language though, which is apparently the reason why people here are pretty much indifferent towards them. Historically, we had our differences, but they helped us at the crucial point (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Croatian_War_of_Independence) of our history. So, thumbs up for Magyars :thumb001:

Horka Ozul
11-19-2009, 05:18 PM
I haven't met many Magyars, but I guess they're OK. They speak a totally incomprehensible language though, which is apparently the reason why people here are pretty much indifferent towards them. Historically, we had our differences, but they helped us at the crucial point (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Croatian_War_of_Independence) of our history. So, thumbs up for Magyars :thumb001:

I wouldn't say indifferent when only in a few days of posting there are 80 replies over this question, and almost 70% of the votes show that people favor us :thumbs up

Monolith
11-19-2009, 05:29 PM
I wouldn't say indifferent when only in a few days of posting there are 80 replies over this question, and almost 70% of the votes show that people favor us :thumbs up
Oh, sorry. I meant people here in Croatia.

Horka Ozul
11-19-2009, 05:43 PM
Oh, sorry. I meant people here in Croatia.

Really? That's disappointing to hear, since we are neighboring countries and you guys were also part of our Kingdom for so many centuries. I know people are very ignorant these days, but to be ignorant and act estranged even with your neighboring countries is not a very promising picture. Me for example, I try to be informed about most of the countries from my region.

Poltergeist
11-19-2009, 05:44 PM
Really? That's disappointing to hear, since we are neighboring countries and you guys were also part of our Kingdom for so many centuries. I know people are very ignorant these days, but to be ignorant and act estranged even with your neighboring countries is not a very promising picture. Me for example, I try to be informed about most of the countries from my region.

It's mutual. Hungarians are on the average also extremely poorly informed on Croatia.

Horka Ozul
11-19-2009, 05:54 PM
It's mutual. Hungarians are on the average also extremely poorly informed on Croatia.

I think the most popular tourist place for hungarians is Croatia from what I read, so I wouldn't say they are poorly informed. I want to believe that in the close future the ties between our two countries will be very strong, meaning that the interest for the culture of one to the other will increase ;)

Poltergeist
11-19-2009, 06:01 PM
I think the most popular tourist place for hungarians is Croatia from what I read, so I wouldn't say they are poorly informed.

The great majority of tourists are interested only in sun and beaches and don't care about history or anything of that kind concerning the country they are visiting. So I guess they are well informed on prices of accomodation in hotels and similar, but poorly on anything more essential about the country. And that applies not only to Hungarian tourists in Croatia, but to tourists in general, everywhere.


I want to believe that in the close future the ties between our two countries will be very strong, meaning that the interest for the culture of one to the other will increase ;)

I hope so too. In fact, it is already happening, albeit in some small circles of historians, historians of art and culture and linguists.

Monolith
11-19-2009, 06:02 PM
Really? That's disappointing to hear, since we are neighboring countries and you guys were also part of our Kingdom for so many centuries. I know people are very ignorant these days, but to be ignorant and act estranged even with your neighboring countries is not a very promising picture. Me for example, I try to be informed about most of the countries from my region.
Well, I agree but what can we do about it? The language barrier seems to be too much of an obstacle. Btw, Croatia was not a part of the Hungarian Kingdom, but in personal union with it, unlike some other territories. ;)

It's mutual. Hungarians are on the average also extremely poorly informed on Croatia.
Yes, it would appear so.

kwp_wp
11-19-2009, 06:05 PM
I feel a little ashamed but I must admit that I've never met any Hungarian. And I haven't got even opportunity to visit Hungary but as a Pole I feel obliged to regard Hungarian as a friendly nation. According to popular billingual proverbial rhyme: "Lengyel, magyar két jó barát, együtt harcol s issza borát" which means "The Pole and Hungarian are two good friends, they fight and drink their wine together".

So I voted: I like them:thumb001:

Horka Ozul
11-19-2009, 07:54 PM
The great majority of tourists are interested only in sun and beaches and don't care about history or anything of that kind concerning the country they are visiting. So I guess they are well informed on prices of accomodation in hotels and similar, but poorly on anything more essential about the country. And that applies not only to Hungarian tourists in Croatia, but to tourists in general, everywhere.



I hope so too. In fact, it is already happening, albeit in some small circles of historians, historians of art and culture and linguists.

Also national radicals ;). Our 64 County Youth Movement has already developed a good relationship with the croat national radicals.

Idun
11-20-2009, 05:19 AM
False, on the contary, ethnic and national identity is very strong here, even if the people's genetical origins who identify as such may differ (not too much, mind you). This is a crossroad of Europe.


~5-7%, and they are the only visible minority; certainly less than in most neighbouring countries and certainly less than the Africans and Muslims of you Northern- and Western Europeans. :p

It's not false just becasue you say so, and most disagree with you. Hungarians are too mixed, in my opinion.

I think the unofficial, real figure of Roma people is a lot higher than that, and there are many who look half-gypsy there so there has obviously been admixture going into the general gene pool for a long, long time. Yes, Sweden has had a problem with immigration for a couple of decades. And for how long has the Roma people been flooding Hungary?



Wikipedia;

"Roma (Gypsies) first appeared in Hungary in the 14th and 15th centuries."


"The Roma people (Hungarian: cigányok or romák) in Hungary represents ~2% (2001 census) or 6-11% (unofficial estimation) of the total population. Since World War II, the number of Roma has increased rapidly, multiplying sevenfold in the last century.

Today every fifth or sixth newborn is Roma."



Both Hungary and Romania lie about how many Roma people they have, I believe, and they are procreating like flies over there, apparently. I hope they can do something about it because it is really a serious problem for them.

Monolith
11-20-2009, 07:39 AM
Both Hungary and Romania lie about how many Roma people they have, I believe, and they are procreating like flies over there, apparently. I hope they can do something about it because it is really a serious problem for them.
What do you propose? Should they be deported to Sweden?

Idun
11-20-2009, 07:50 AM
What do you propose? Should they be deported to Sweden?


That seems to be the general idea, since you don't want them in your countries. Ask the Italians, the French and the Irish what they think.. They are apparently popping up there now in greater numbers. Thanks EU! :thumb001:

It is getting a real problem in the EU so they even keep the Romas now from leaving their countries (unofficially because Northern Europe does not want their Roma people):


"ROMANIAN ROMA PROTEST INTERDICTION TO LEAVE THE COUNTRY. Some 200
Roma staged a protest at the railway station of Arad, western
Romania, on 27 August after being denied permission to leave the
country, Mediafax and AP reported. The permission was denied three
days earlier. The Roma and their families occupied the railway
station and slept on benches in Arad parks, triggering subsequent
protests by the local population.

The Roma said they had intended to
travel to neighboring Hungary to visit relatives or find work there,
but the authorities denied them exit, saying they did not satisfy
travel requirements. Border controls were recently tightened to
combat illegal emigration."

I suggest you send them back to India before they have completely taken over the region.

Monolith
11-20-2009, 08:06 AM
I suggest you send them back to India before they have completely taken over the region.
Allegedly, they don't like them in India either.

Idun
11-20-2009, 08:13 AM
Allegedly, they don't like them in India either.

lol

No, they never did like their own people.

Horka Ozul
11-20-2009, 06:35 PM
It's not false just becasue you say so, and most disagree with you. Hungarians are too mixed, in my opinion.

I think the unofficial, real figure of Roma people is a lot higher than that, and there are many who look half-gypsy there so there has obviously been admixture going into the general gene pool for a long, long time. Yes, Sweden has had a problem with immigration for a couple of decades. And for how long has the Roma people been flooding Hungary?



Wikipedia;

"Roma (Gypsies) first appeared in Hungary in the 14th and 15th centuries."


"The Roma people (Hungarian: cigányok or romák) in Hungary represents ~2% (2001 census) or 6-11% (unofficial estimation) of the total population. Since World War II, the number of Roma has increased rapidly, multiplying sevenfold in the last century.

Today every fifth or sixth newborn is Roma."



Both Hungary and Romania lie about how many Roma people they have, I believe, and they are procreating like flies over there, apparently. I hope they can do something about it because it is really a serious problem for them.

With this post you shown your true color: another "Nordic puritan" who knows little about a region but always speaks "absolute truths", like she would know anything specific about :rolleyes:. Hungarians never mixed with romas, romas marry and breed among themselves, hungarians are Danubic, Alpinid, East-Baltid, Dinaric looking people. Your assumptions about hungarians are ridiculous and puts you into a bad shade.

Moustache
01-24-2010, 06:51 PM
Are you serious? You can't even realize why I find you words offending? I know I'm new over here, and I don't like to judge people I don't know, but your question is as shallow as a puddle.

Haha, I should have informed Mesrine that the Great Plain (Alföld) in Hungarian self-image only takes a central, uniformising position during the course of the 18-19th centuries, elevated to and forming part of a "national culture" also highlighted by verbunkos and csárdás that remain perhaps the single most readily available identifiers of Hungarian culture both in our eyes and those of foreigners, with these dance styles originating, unsurprisingly, from the Alföld, whence they spread to virtually all regions inhabited by Magyars.

I understand your grievance regarding his use of "steppe nigger", seeing as you are a "mountain nigger", but instead of launching into another Byzantine sentence, I give the floor to none other than Petőfi Sándor, our trademark poet from the era romanticism.

Petőfi Sándor: The Alföld

(Excerpt, translation by Kürti László)

What are you to me, land of the grim Carpathians,
For all your romantic wild-pine forest?
I may admire you, but I could not love you,
For in your hills and valleys my imagination could not rest.

My home and my world are there,
In the Alföld, flat as the sea,
From its prison my soul soars like an eagle,
When the infinity of the plains I see.

How beatiful you are to me, Alföld
Land of my birth where my cradle was rocked,
It is here that the shroud should cover my body
And my grave rise up over me

(...)

Moustache
01-24-2010, 06:51 PM
Unfortunately is a fact that at least half of hungarians who migrate to the U.S., Canada, Australia don't teach the unique hungarian language to their children who get to be born in these countries, the correct explanation and the reason for this is totally beyond me, but I think also other Europeans have the same assimilation proportions as hungarians have. Unfortunately arabics, east asiatics are way more conservative in preserving their mother culture, that's why they are omnipresent in these countries, while you can barely hear anything about hungarians, romanians, ukrainians, spanish, finns, etc., might be doing in North America.

Several factors I've considered:

1. Communities need a certain size to be able to sustain themselves in a foreign environment before dipping below a point of no return.

2. Unlike most other ethnicities emigrating to the Americas and Western Europe from the Kingdom of Hungary, the Hungarian group of emigrés weren't primarily comprised of working-class people, but intellectuals whose background suggests an easier acceptance of the host country's mainstream. In fact, brain drain is a phenomenon all too known to us.

3. Individualism vs. collectivism. Hungarians are more individualistic than our neighbours South, East, North and West. While there will be certain events carried by the community, the patterns of Hungarians abroad socialising are individualistic and not subject to supervision by a "central circle". Control mechanisms like shaming, e.g. "X already talks more like a Canadian than a Hungarian" will only have a limited effect. I understand this is opposed to more collectivist cultures where singles for example would appear in closely-knit groups, a display of "pack mentality".

Moustache
01-24-2010, 06:52 PM
Hungarians are an interesting people. I had a Hungarian girlfriend in the period 2000 - 2001. I also travelled to Hungary during that time, met her family and friends. I even contemplated the possibility of settling there. However, in the end I could not get myself to do it. The cultural differences were too big for me -- being used to the British Commonwealth way of life. And there is something about the Hungarian tendency to be depressed for life that didn't appeal to me. Hungarians usually have a pessimistic outlook on life, and this was one of the major reasons why I could not fit in there.

I voted for "I like them".

So you traveled abroad to romance a girl and by the end of the adventure you found yourself musing about Magyar pessimism? I think you may have become more typically Magyar than you even realise. :D

Seriously though, I'm surprised, not to hear the stereotype of pessimistic Hungarians per se, but to hear it from the perspective of someone we Hungarians would think about as hailing from the "North". I'll elaborate. The concepts "North" and "South" don't describe a geographically crystallised divide running somewhere across Europe, but subjective terms applied by a group to another in which they see these "northern" or "southern" traits manifested. For example, Hungarian Catholics will typecast Calvinists as "gloomy, stuck-up, austere, miserly", these being classic negative "northward" stereotypes.

Negative stereotypes, whether "north-" or "southward", are used to demarcate fundamental, unbridgeable differences between your group and the other, in the exact same context you did.

Moustache
01-24-2010, 06:53 PM
I am proud of Zoltán Dani. Dani lives in Serbia and enjoys his bakery business. I have great respect for Dani`s loyalty to people with whom he shares his everyday life.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/87/Zoltan_Dani.jpg

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tOCHjOxR2SQ

What, you only have to shoot down a stealth plane now to be accepted by Serbs? You guys are easily impressed.

Take Ambrus Attila (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attila_Ambrus) who had to go through the ordeal of robbing about 30 banks in order to become a legend in Hungary; his popularity without exaggeration knows no limits, when there's even a band in Oregon dedicated to him (The Whiskey Robbers), what is there left to say?

Moustache
01-24-2010, 06:53 PM
Hmm, you know, I already stated my positive impression, but I feel bound to repeat what my Ukrainian ex-almost-mother-in-law shared with me once. She was very young in the war, but her parents told her all about it, and it seems that Hungarians were stationed to occupy Sumiiskaya Oblast in the northern central part of Ukraine. She told me that the German officers behaved like gentlemen, but that the Hungarians were rather brutal towards the villagers... :suomut:


You would hope so. But I can't help wondering that they'd been taught about 1848 in a way rather unsympathetic to the ordinary Russian people, instead of just the Tsar' and his ministers. :(
I'm just saying you shouldn't overidealise your fellow nationals in the dirty times of the 20th Century.

What were the reasons behind the revolution and freedom struggle of 1848/49?

Jarl
01-24-2010, 06:54 PM
http://i45.tinypic.com/30c3kzn.jpg

Osweo
01-24-2010, 08:03 PM
What were the reasons behind the revolution and freedom struggle of 1848/49?

In a word, Metternich, no?

Moustache
01-24-2010, 08:12 PM
In a word, Metternich, no?

And was Metternich Russian?

EDIT: I ask because you seem to make a new connection between negative attitudes of Hungarians specifically towards Russia and Russians as a result of 1848/49 (for which I'm struggling to find a single reference in literature, folklore etc.) and accounts of brutality in Ukraine from a third-hand source.

Murphy
01-24-2010, 09:00 PM
Hungarians? I admire them.

Regards,
The Papist.

Osweo
01-24-2010, 09:15 PM
And was Metternich Russian?

EDIT: I ask because you seem to make a new connection between negative attitudes of Hungarians specifically towards Russia and Russians as a result of 1848/49 (for which I'm struggling to find a single reference in literature, folklore etc.) and accounts of brutality in Ukraine from a third-hand source.

Austrian.

The Tsar lent Russian troops to stamp out the uprisings in Hungary, I believe. 'Holy Alliance' and all that... :ohwell:

December
01-25-2010, 03:53 AM
Most people in Portugal still think Hungarians are Slavs because of the Iron Curtain. People still equate Communism = Slavs. My father thought East Germany was Slav, go figure.

Personally I don't have any opinion about them. I know their history and all but I never met a single Hungarian. I know they have some gorgeous girls, that's all. Well, Orsi Fehér (sister of the ill-fated Miklós) is a TV presenter in Portugal and she's such a hottie with a delicious accent :D

http://modaellas.com/wp-content/ent_105_Orsi_Feher_photo_small.jpg

Their language is kinky. First time I listened someone speaking Magyar, without knowing who was speaking, I thought it was Osmanli. After some time you start telling it widely apart as it seems much smoother. I suppose back in time Turkic languages and Magyar had some common Uralic root, no? Anyway I expected it to resemble Finnic languages a lot more. It is indeed one of the few European languages I don't understand a single bit.

Hrolf Kraki
01-25-2010, 07:12 PM
Most people in Portugal still think Hungarians are Slavs because of the Iron Curtain. People still equate Communism = Slavs. My father thought East Germany was Slav, go figure.



I don't think anyone here would even know what a Slav was. :p

Moustache
01-26-2010, 12:00 AM
Austrian.

The Tsar lent Russian troops to stamp out the uprisings in Hungary, I believe. 'Holy Alliance' and all that... :ohwell:

You explained atrocities, real or not, committed in the Ukraine in the 1940s with a bias towards Russians that, as you suggested, was born out of resentment for happenings a century earlier. There is absolutely nothing to support this link. All anger, spite, revenge fantasies are directed towards the Austrian elite in general and Franz Josef in particular in the long list of literature dealing with the subject. If anything, calling on the Tsar to help out only deepened contempt towards the Kaiser - he is likened to the coward who, when losing a fight, calls on a 500-strong pack to help out and agitates his opponent's family to turn on him.

Russia's popularity index pummeted when they occupied and oppressed Hungary following WW2. I see you like Russians, but you should proceed with care when internalising an opinion you haven't cross-checked.


Most people in Portugal still think Hungarians are Slavs because of the Iron Curtain. People still equate Communism = Slavs. My father thought East Germany was Slav, go figure.

Finally, something fresh. Normally, people confuse us for Slavs because we spit sunflower seeds from the corner of our mouth semi-automatic style, just as we do with consonants (those interjecting at this point that Hungarian actually has a consonant vowel ratio of nearly 1:1 - LAY OFF THE TURANIST PROPAGANDA!) on top of playing the bad guys on the cinema screen.

Your pops wasn't that far off with his associations though. If Communism = Slavs and East Germany = Slavs, then Communism = East Germany. After all, Marx and Engels were both German.


Personally I don't have any opinion about them. I know their history and all but I never met a single Hungarian. I know they have some gorgeous girls, that's all. Well, Orsi Fehér (sister of the ill-fated Miklós) is a TV presenter in Portugal and she's such a hottie with a delicious accent :D

http://modaellas.com/wp-content/ent_105_Orsi_Feher_photo_small.jpg

Apart from a party the Portuguese embassy threw after the EURO 2000 quarter-final (I can only imagine what went on in 2004), I don't recall meeting any Portuguese either, only Lusophones from Brazil, Angola and Mozambique. No direct relations between the two nations translates to no precise views or stereotypes of one another, all we have is a Magyarised version of an arrogant French proverb: "merrily the Portuguese plays his bagpipe".

The first time I encountered Portuguese was while clicking through channels on a Sunday afternoon: I landed at a broadcast of a football game, with a cryptic RTP placed on the upper corner of the screen. For a moment, I was left in doubt whether the last intial was for Portugal or Polska, before "Faltes Cometidas" appeared on the screen along with Jorge Costa's bulldog face, and that settled it. Portuguese sounds ambiguous at first, as if it could be Slavic (note: I don't speak any Slavic languages), but once you wrap your head around the peculiarities and work from Latin, it becomes easy. I decidedly like the boomerang cadence, it's one of the aspects I'm fast to pick up and imitate in any given language (like rhythm and dynamics in music).


Their language is kinky. First time I listened someone speaking Magyar, without knowing who was speaking, I thought it was Osmanli. After some time you start telling it widely apart as it seems much smoother. I suppose back in time Turkic languages and Magyar had some common Uralic root, no? Anyway I expected it to resemble Finnic languages a lot more. It is indeed one of the few European languages I don't understand a single bit.

The way you describe Hungarian sounds like judging a wine: you anticipate the taste, apreciate the richness of the flavours, relate it to other wines. I think it's the Orsi aftertaste at work. :thumb001:

Phil75231
01-26-2010, 12:09 AM
Hungarians?

Well, they're people. Never met one IRL, so I can't say anything about them. So I assume they're just like everyone else.

Grumpy Cat
01-26-2010, 12:14 AM
I've never met any Hungarians, but I do like their food.

I do work with an American of Hungarian descent, though.

Actually, correction: I did have a Hungarian prof in university, but it was only a short course, she was nice.

December
01-26-2010, 01:29 AM
Finally, something fresh. Normally, people confuse us for Slavs because we spit sunflower seeds from the corner of our mouth semi-automatic style, just as we do with consonants (those interjecting at this point that Hungarian actually has a consonant vowel ratio of nearly 1:1 - LAY OFF THE TURANIST PROPAGANDA!) on top of playing the bad guys on the cinema screen.I never thought of Hungary as part of a "Turanid" reality, not even in childhood. The link seems a lot far-fetched and mostly invoked by Turkey and their imperialist homesickness. Never saw a Hungarian in Portugal even remotely looking like a Turk. Not even similar to an Ottoman Turk. Al the famous Hungarians in Portugal looked central-Euro, kind of a link between Germans and Slavs. Szabo, Bölöni, Fehér.


Your pops wasn't that far off with his associations though. If Communism = Slavs and East Germany = Slavs, then Communism = East Germany. After all, Marx and Engels were both German.Marx and Engels........ German............. hm........... like Einstein? ;)

Anyway I theorize that the former perception about East Germany being Slav is more due to the apparent "cold-as-soviet" their athletes used to appear in sports.


Apart from a party the Portuguese embassy threw after the EURO 2000 quarter-final (I can only imagine what went on in 2004), Rubbing salt on our wounds? :D


I don't recall meeting any Portuguese either, only Lusophones from Brazil, Angola and Mozambique.Typical. They use our country as a pivot.


No direct relations between the two nations translates to no precise views or stereotypes of one another, all we have is a Magyarised version of an arrogant French proverb: "merrily the Portuguese plays his bagpipe".Hm... in the 40's, 50's and 60's, Hungary was seen in Portugal as the school of football.


The first time I encountered Portuguese was while clicking through channels on a Sunday afternoon: I landed at a broadcast of a football game, with a cryptic RTP placed on the upper corner of the screen. For a moment, I was left in doubt whether the last intial was for Portugal or Polska, before "Faltes Cometidas" appeared on the screen along with Jorge Costa's bulldog face, and that settled it.-Faltas Cometidas- Ahahahaha!!!! Jorge Costa associated with "Commited Fouls" and seen as a bulldog as far as Hungary! Only FC Porto supporters won't see it. :D


Portuguese sounds ambiguous at first, as if it could be Slavic (note: I don't speak any Slavic languages), but once you wrap your head around the peculiarities and work from Latin, it becomes easy. I decidedly like the boomerang cadence, it's one of the aspects I'm fast to pick up and imitate in any given language (like rhythm and dynamics in music).Portuguese = Latin Polish :D


The way you describe Hungarian sounds like judging a wine: you anticipate the taste, apreciate the richness of the flavours, relate it to other wines. I think it's the Orsi aftertaste at work. :thumb001:Indeed, indeed!

Moustache
01-28-2010, 12:32 AM
I never thought of Hungary as part of a "Turanid" reality, not even in childhood. The link seems a lot far-fetched and mostly invoked by Turkey and their imperialist homesickness. Never saw a Hungarian in Portugal even remotely looking like a Turk. Not even similar to an Ottoman Turk. Al the famous Hungarians in Portugal looked central-Euro, kind of a link between Germans and Slavs. Szabo, Bölöni, Fehér.

Good topic. This is a large thread and there's plenty of time.

As regards phenotypes, Lipcsei Péter (http://www.flagmagazin.hu/userfiles/text/lipcsei_peter.jpg), long-standing captain of Ferencváros, club of my home district in Budapest enjoyed a stint in Portugal inthe 90s. He wouldn't be atypical anywhere in the Carpathian Basin. In fact, there are few phenotypes all around Europe I can think of which would make me question their ancestry, if they spoke to me in Hungarian. Add to that types infrequently encountered on the continent.

It's hard to make out regional patterns, North-South or West-East clines, given the population history of the country. I'll say however that legendary steppe pirate Rózsa Sándor seen in my avatar is used as an example of a type people associate with the Alföld (Great Hungarian Plain), with his euryprosopy, sharp features that Hungarian anthropologists class as the Alföldi subtype of Turanoid forms. This portrait (http://www.festomuvesz.hu/szavasandor/kepek/2009_01_04/Rozsa%20Sandor%20%28betyar%29.jpg) styled after the photograph fits the description of the Alföldi type even more than Rózsa's actual appearance that IMO shows Dinaricisation.


Marx and Engels........ German............. hm........... like Einstein? ;)

I can see how Einstein's IQ would keep him from socialising with the Müllers, but yeah, realistically speaking, all of the above were German.


Anyway I theorize that the former perception about East Germany being Slav is more due to the apparent "cold-as-soviet" their athletes used to appear in sports.

The moustache? ;)


Rubbing salt on our wounds? :D

Not to rub it in, but I won a handsome amount of money by betting on Greece throughout the tournament. More here (http://www.theapricity.com/forum/showthread.php?p=164352&posted=1#post164352).


Typical. They use our country as a pivot.

The lusophone Africans actually came to Hungary as students in times when we were building Socialism, the red version of development aid. Most went back, they did leave a few mulattos with incredibly diverse looks though, which to me points out the variety of Magyar phenotypes apparent even in such mixes.


Hm... in the 40's, 50's and 60's, Hungary was seen in Portugal as the school of football.

My uncle has a sports magazine from 1966, with match reports of the World Cup, that he keeps locked in something of a treasure chest, along with an antique edition of Karl May's stories. It's almost something sacred to him.


-Faltas Cometidas- Ahahahaha!!!! Jorge Costa associated with "Commited Fouls" and seen as a bulldog as far as Hungary! Only FC Porto supporters won't see it. :D

I remember well: it was the season during which Jardel had an out-of-this-world scoring record. Even though most of the games were uneven from the start, just like the Portuguese league as a whole, I liked the show. Seeing Schmeichel play was also memorable. Given that broadcasts didn't clash with La Liga fixtures and both channels featured bullfighting on the respective matchdays, I would look forward to a mixture of corridas and football on the weekends. Good times.

Kanasyuvigi
02-03-2010, 10:05 PM
Nice thread! I admire the hungarians for preserving their language. As far as I know, they have their own word even for "police" :D and avoid using words with non-magyar roots. Also, as it was mentioned, Magyars were closely related to the ancient Bulgars.

Arrow Cross
03-14-2010, 03:55 AM
Heck, why not? Bump!

Brynhild
03-14-2010, 06:47 AM
I voted 3, as Hungarians don't exactly flock to our part of the world, so I haven't had the opportunity to meet any of them. I love goulash, though.

Sol Invictus
03-14-2010, 06:50 AM
My Aunt married a Hungarian guy. He used to beat her and talk trash about her. Throughout my entire life I never spoke to him and he never spoke to me in 20 years. He was one of those straight of the boat Hungarians. I never liked him.

Lenny
03-14-2010, 08:19 AM
I Like Them for a number of reasons.

The reasons range from the personal to the political to the frivolous. Such as: the fact that a kind Hungarian man named George was a regular at the little church I attended as a boy, to the fact that I view them as closer kin than any of their neighbors, to the fact that I was greatly impressed by seeing this movie (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1092021/).

I have never been to Hungary, but I get the impression it is fairly similar to Germany (except politically -- Germany has that aggravating forced-multikulti insanity). Hungarians' attitudes and Weltanschauung, the way the people think, is admirable.

Arrow Cross
03-14-2010, 02:13 PM
The reasons range from the personal to the political to the frivolous. Such as: the fact that a kind Hungarian man named George was a regular at the little church I attended as a boy, to the fact that I view them as closer kin than any of their neighbors, to the fact that I was greatly impressed by seeing this movie (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1092021/).
Speaking of movies... it's rare that I say such a thing about a modern Hollywood creation, but I'd certainly recommend this one (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0486219/). Its English title is 'Children of Glory'.

c2ESx9B-2zE

Nationalitist
03-14-2010, 02:14 PM
Where has the old troll Hamvas/Lajos Kossuth disappeared to throw in a comment or two?

Arrow Cross
03-14-2010, 02:17 PM
Where has the old troll Hamvas/Lajos Kossuth disappeared to throw in a comment or two?
http://www.theapricity.com/forum/member.php?u=1000

Fake Hungarian is fake.

Nationalitist
03-14-2010, 02:18 PM
http://www.theapricity.com/forum/member.php?u=1000

Fake Hungarian is fake.

Now he is teh fake nigger. :D

Albion
04-10-2010, 10:03 PM
Yeah, I can't say English people have strong views on Hungarians. We don't really know a lot about you guys to be honest, but most people like Budapest and know of it for its architecture and sights.
I think people mostly know Hungary here for being part of Austria-Hungary and being quite powerful under the Magyars.

In general I'd say we like Hungarians here in England, the English don't show that affection to all peoples though.

Arrow Cross
04-10-2010, 10:10 PM
I think people mostly know Hungary here for being part of Austria-Hungary and being quite powerful under the Magyars.
We are the Magyars, it's our own word for 'Hungarian'.

'Powerful', therefore, is best applied in a past tense sentence.

Piparskeggr
04-11-2010, 04:08 AM
..but, I like to use Hungarian Paprika for cooking :D

Absinthe
04-11-2010, 09:54 AM
Yeah, I can't say English people have strong views on Hungarians.

I have yet to hear a negative stereotype of any sort about Hungarians, not just from the English.

I guess Hungarians are generally liked, or, at worst, generally ignored. ;)

Daos
04-11-2010, 10:57 AM
I guess Hungarians are generally liked, or, at worst, generally ignored. ;)

You should ask people that live in areas that were under Hungarian rule...;)

Monolith
04-11-2010, 11:25 AM
You should ask people that live in areas that were under Hungarian rule...;)
They exerted much political influence on Croatia (which at the time was a separate kingdom in personal union with Hungary), and while there was some resentment towards them in the past, those time are long gone.

Daos
04-11-2010, 11:36 AM
They exerted much political influence on Croatia (which at the time was a separate kingdom in personal union with Hungary), and while there was some resentment towards them in the past, those time are long gone.

The Romanian territories were incorporated in the Hungarian Kingdom, so I guess that made things a lot worse...

Arrow Cross
04-11-2010, 12:45 PM
The Hungarian minority in Croatia has always been near-nonexistent, and our neighbourly coexistence has often been praised as exemplary in Europe.

But Transylvania is a vastly different case. When the main body of Hungarians arrived in the Carpathian Basin in 895, they already found an "earlier wave", the Székelys (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Székely) here, inhabiting Transylvania, speaking the same language. It was also settled by various Slavic tribes, many of whom were forced to leave, but as the Vlachs ('Romanians' today) began to move in from the south and the east starting in the XIIIth Century, the area became more and more multi-ethnic.

Bleeding dry against the Tatars and Turks in endless wars also didn't help our population much, which, according to modern estimates, dropped from 4 million at the height of Mathias Corvinus' (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathias_Corvinus) rule to 2 million by the end of the XVIIth Century, around the times of the Great Turkish War (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Turkish_War).

It caused the new Habsburg rulers to call, lure, or persuade in even more settlers to replace the population loss, Serbs from the south, Saxons from the west, and Vlachs from the east to Transylvania. Since the concept of nationhood wasn't formed in its modern sense yet, the ethnic tensions were rather few.

But the events and ideas of the XIXth and XXth Century gave rise to rivalries living on 'till the present day. Such is the ultimate fate of multi-ethnic areas. I suppose these feuds won't even die even if all of Europe will strangulate to death in the grip of multiracial liberalism in the meantime.

Daos
04-11-2010, 01:14 PM
It was also settled by various Slavic tribes, many of whom were forced to leave, but as the Vlachs ('Romanians' today) began to move in from the south and the east starting in the XIIIth Century, the area became more and more multi-ethnic.

And do you actually expect anyone to believe that there were no Romanians in Transylvania - the former "heart" of the Dacian Kingdom?! I don't suppose you have any proof now, do you?


Bleeding dry against the Tatars and Turks in endless wars also didn't help our population much, which, according to modern estimates, dropped from 4 million at the height of Mathias Corvinus' (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathias_Corvinus) rule to 2 million by the end of the XVIIth Century, around the times of the Great Turkish War (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Turkish_War).

Bled dry, eh? Then what about Wallachia and Moldova - the buffer zones? They seemed to manage...:rolleyes:



It caused the new Habsburg rulers to call, lure, or persuade in even more settlers to replace the population loss, Serbs from the south, Saxons from the west, and Vlachs from the east to Transylvania. Since the concept of nationhood wasn't formed in its modern sense yet, the ethnic tensions were rather few.

Yet that still didn't stop them from trying to convert us and force us to speak Hungarian...


But the events and ideas of the XIXth and XXth Century gave rise to rivalries living on 'till the present day. Such is the ultimate fate of multi-ethnic areas. I suppose these feuds won't even die even if all of Europe will strangulate to death in the grip of multiracial liberalism in the meantime.

Oh, really? Then what was the Revolt of Horea, Cloșca and Crișan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Revolt_of_Horea,_Clo%C5%9Fca_and_Cri%C5%9Fan)?

Arrow Cross
04-11-2010, 01:32 PM
And do you actually expect anyone to believe that there were no Romanians in Transylvania - the former "heart" of the Dacian Kingdom?! I don't suppose you have any proof now, do you?
Oh please. Outside of Romania, the "Daco-Roman" origin theory is considered what it is: pseudo-history. You have nothing to fear from, or be ashamed of real history.

http://www.imninalu.net/myths-Vlach.htm


Bled dry, eh? Then what about Wallachia and Moldova - the buffer zones? They seemed to manage...:rolleyes:
Buffer zones. Hungary was the frontier of a constant war itself for 200 years.


Yet that still didn't stop them from trying to convert us and force us to speak Hungarian...
I'll be the first to acknowledge the error of Magyarization, I do believe in the necessity of full ethnic autonomy... that is, if we ever want a Europe with its nations coexisting like Christians should and standing united against external threats.


Oh, really? Then what was the Revolt of Horea, Cloșca and Crișan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Revolt_of_Horea,_Clo%C5%9Fca_and_Cri%C5%9Fan)?
A result of the Enlightenment's rush of ideas. While still in the XVIIIth Century, these events, much like nationalism and liberalism themselves, belong more to the XIXth Century, when they truly developed themselves.

Daos
04-11-2010, 02:02 PM
Oh please. Outside of Romania, the "Daco-Roman" origin theory is considered what it is: pseudo-history. You have nothing to fear from, or be ashamed of real history.

http://www.imninalu.net/myths-Vlach.htm

You know, we could have an entire thread debating how retarded that site is...


Buffer zones. Hungary was the frontier of a constant war itself for 200 years.

Moldova was founded because Louis I wanted a line of defence against the Golden Horde. Both Wallachia and Moldova had frequent wars with the Ottomans, yet didn't have to "import" people to fill the gap...


I'll be the first to acknowledge the error of Magyarization, I do believe in the necessity of full ethnic autonomy... that is, if we ever want a Europe with its nations coexisting like Christians should and standing united against external threats.

At least one thing we agree upon...:)

Arrow Cross
04-11-2010, 02:23 PM
You know, we could have an entire thread debating how retarded that site is...
I of course didn't expect any other kind of a response. Beliefs in such topics are deeply rooted in everyone's heart who loves his nation, and they are very hard to change, if they change at all. :)

Better if you cling to myths than to the modern liberal nihil that destroys everything that's value.


At least one thing we agree upon...:)
Indeed. So how about the topic of the thread? Forget history for a while now, what do you have against the Hungarian people themselves? What are they like in day-to-day situations, from your perspective?

The (mostly rural) Transylvanians I've known have all been a decent and hard-working kind, and though generally somber, they tend to keep our culture and traditions alive with such a wonderfully stubborn flame that often makes us "westerners" bow down before their spirit.

Daos
04-12-2010, 06:33 AM
I of course didn't expect any other kind of a response. Beliefs in such topics are deeply rooted in everyone's heart who loves his nation, and they are very hard to change, if they change at all. :)

Better if you cling to myths than to the modern liberal nihil that destroys everything that's value.

Do you actually have any knowledge of early Romanian history or do you just dismiss everything as myth? It cannot be a myth since there is archaeological evidence of our continuity.


Indeed. So how about the topic of the thread? Forget history for a while now, what do you have against the Hungarian people themselves? What are they like in day-to-day situations, from your perspective?

I have mixed feelings about Hungarians... I've met many types of (Transylvanian) Hungarians, most were pretty decent folk, I guess. But the thing is, they are a pretty numerous minority and they seem to live in a parallel world from ours - many speak "broken" Romanian, some can't speak it at all!

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/b5/Hungarians_Romania2.svg/776px-Hungarians_Romania2.svg.png

I wonder how would have Hungary treated its Romanian minority, had they not integrated... Would they have been as tolerant? I doubt it! We are slowly giving autonomy to the Székely Land (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sz%C3%A9kely_land) - it's like a huge tear in our country's core... They are also pushing for making Hungarian a compulsory subject in schools and, judging what spineless politicians we have, it's just a matter of time. Obviously, I find this distressing: a minority imposing over the majority.

P.S.: Here's a fun fact: the gypsies in Székely Land call themselves Hungarians - no doubt that helps making the Hungarians seem more numerous in statistics...:P On the other hand, I appreciate the fact that whenever the gypsies make trouble, the Hungarian villagers don't hesitate to attack them.:D

Monolith
04-12-2010, 08:44 PM
Oh please. Outside of Romania, the "Daco-Roman" origin theory is considered what it is: pseudo-history. You have nothing to fear from, or be ashamed of real history.

http://www.imninalu.net/myths-Vlach.htm

From your link:

The Vlach were not Dacians, but an Illyric people, originated in the south-western Balkans by the south-eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea ‒ namely, the present-day Albania and Slavic Macedonia.

I remember Osweo saying something quite similar on Stirpes some time ago, that Romanians came from what is today central Serbia.

Arrow Cross
04-12-2010, 09:15 PM
I have mixed feelings about Hungarians... I've met many types of (Transylvanian) Hungarians, most were pretty decent folk, I guess. But the thing is, they are a pretty numerous minority and they seem to live in a parallel world from ours - many speak "broken" Romanian, some can't speak it at all!
---->

Yet that still didn't stop them from trying to convert us and force us to speak Hungarian...
What was wrong back then is still wrong today, reversed.

According to Rev. László Tőkés - I hardly have to introduce him -, there are still many cases in which Hungarians are compelled to speak Romanian, even exclusively in their own affairs like local courts in the Hargita.


I wonder how would have Hungary treated its Romanian minority, had they not integrated... Would they have been as tolerant? I doubt it! We are slowly giving autonomy to the Székely Land (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sz%C3%A9kely_land) - it's like a huge tear in our country's core...
There still are self-defining Romanians, Slovakians, Germans, etc. here, but I've frankly never heard of any atrocities committed against any fellow European minorities, even though the media would love to screech about such deeds done by the daaaangerously ascending "far-right". But every country has its hotheaded, militant chauvinists who cannot be reasoned with.

Remember though: autonomy is not separation. (http://www.tokeslaszlo.ro/en/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=39:the-bugaboo-of-hungarian-irredentism-and-the-double-measure&catid=2:press-room&Itemid=3)


They are also pushing for making Hungarian a compulsory subject in schools and, judging what spineless politicians we have, it's just a matter of time. Obviously, I find this distressing: a minority imposing over the majority.
In schools where? In certain counties, Székelys are a majority, so it'd make sense there, but obviously not everywhere. Do you have a source?


P.S.: Here's a fun fact: the gypsies in Székely Land call themselves Hungarians - no doubt that helps making the Hungarians seem more numerous in statistics...:P On the other hand, I appreciate the fact that whenever the gypsies make trouble, the Hungarian villagers don't hesitate to attack them.:D
I'm quite sure there are many wannabe-Romanian Gyps in other parts of the country as well, and I sure hope they get the same treatment if they're... ahem, "being themselves". :)

Daos
04-13-2010, 05:12 AM
What was wrong back then is still wrong today, reversed.

You can't really compare it... An Empire is one thing, but a Nation another and these are different times.


According to Rev. László Tőkés - I hardly have to introduce him -, there are still many cases in which Hungarians are compelled to speak Romanian, even exclusively in their own affairs like local courts in the Hargita.

That may be so, but we're living in the 21st century, is it so hard to learn the language of the majority when others learn English or German?;)


There still are self-defining Romanians, Slovakians, Germans, etc. here, but I've frankly never heard of any atrocities committed against any fellow European minorities, even though the media would love to screech about such deeds done by the daaaangerously ascending "far-right". But every country has its hotheaded, militant chauvinists who cannot be reasoned with.

Let me ask you this: when was the last time you heard someone speak Romanian in your country? I hear Hungarian every day.:)


Remember though: autonomy is not separation. (http://www.tokeslaszlo.ro/en/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=39:the-bugaboo-of-hungarian-irredentism-and-the-double-measure&catid=2:press-room&Itemid=3)

No? Kosovo anyone?;)


In schools where? In certain counties, Székelys are a majority, so it'd make sense there, but obviously not everywhere. Do you have a source?

In all Transylvanian schools. Oh, don't you worry, we already have special schools for Hungarians in all towns with a sizeable population of Hungarians.

Arrow Cross
04-13-2010, 09:57 AM
You can't really compare it... An Empire is one thing, but a Nation another and these are different times.

That may be so, but we're living in the 21st century, is it so hard to learn the language of the majority when others learn English or German?;)
Alas, a double standard is still a double standard, which is unjust. I agree that they should learn Romanian in order to participate in the greater society, but it truly wouldn't hurt anyone if the poor Székely peasant would be just left alone in his isolated little village with the whole thing, being allowed to manage his affairs in his own ancestral tongue, now would it? ;)


Let me ask you this: when was the last time you heard someone speak Romanian in your country?
Never, I haven't been to Southeastern Hungary yet.


I hear Hungarian every day.:)
But that's great to know. In certain parts of Slovakia, using that language openly risks one getting beaten up.

Daos
04-13-2010, 12:15 PM
But that's great to know. In certain parts of Slovakia, using that language openly risks one getting beaten up.

Here you only get beaten up if you parade through town with the Hungarian flag.:D Ever since the Romans conquered us, we've been a bunch of pussies...:tsk:

Arrow Cross
04-13-2010, 01:23 PM
Here you only get beaten up if you parade through town with the Hungarian flag.:D Ever since the Romans conquered us, we've been a bunch of pussies...:tsk:
Oh, good to know! I'm planning to visit this summer, so I'll make sure I'll only bring the Árpád flag (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Árpád_stripes) to parade with. :cool:

http://static.168ora.hu/db/03/AE/0339-0601-d000003AE269db0c426de.jpg

Harcos
02-17-2011, 10:06 PM
The Romanian territories were incorporated in the Hungarian Kingdom, so I guess that made things a lot worse...

No original Rumanian name for Transylvania is even recorded. The present and historical Rumanian name for Transylvania, Ardeal, has no meaning. But is an adaption of an older Magyar name of the region, Erdő-elve ( which later evolved into Erdély ) which means the Land beyond the forest, translated by Hungarians into Latin as Transylvania. Such a name verifies it to be of Magyar extraction. If this would instead have been of original Rumanian extraction with a Rumanian viewpoint, then the name would have been Transcarpathia, the Land beyond the Carpathian mountains! Consequently, if Rumanians were already there when the Magyars arrived, then why did they adopt a Magyar name for a region they were native to?

It is rather Hungarian territories which have been incorporated into Romania. The genuine Rumanian borders stops at the Danube, the Dniestr and the Carpathians.

princess
02-17-2011, 10:08 PM
My cousins are Hungarian and I've always felt welcome whenever I've visited them. Hungarians are very warm people and their country is *beautiful*!

Dario Argento
02-17-2011, 10:18 PM
I'm 3/4 hungarian, yet I've never had the opportunity to visit the country. As soon as I finish my studies it will be the first place I will visit.

The Journeyman
02-17-2011, 10:32 PM
Warm people, good food, and hot porn stars.

Don Brick
02-17-2011, 10:37 PM
Warm people, good food, and hot porn stars.

Indeed. I´ve often wondered why this is. :fponder:

Raikaswinţs
02-17-2011, 11:01 PM
I don´t think about them. That option is not listed. I know something about their history and culture, and a few words of their language. But I do not hold any stereotype about them, nor think about them or talk about them in my daily life

Svipdag
02-17-2011, 11:19 PM
I have known very few Hungarians. Those whom I have happened to encounter are complex passionate people who add a dash of paprika to the ethnic stew.

Daos
02-18-2011, 04:37 AM
No original Rumanian name for Transylvania is even recorded. The present and historical Rumanian name for Transylvania, Ardeal, has no meaning. But is an adaption of an older Magyar name of the region, Erdő-elve ( which later evolved into Erdély ) which means the Land beyond the forest, translated by Hungarians into Latin as Transylvania. Such a name verifies it to be of Magyar extraction.

Thank you for the lesson, but, believe it or not, I already new these things.;)


If this would instead have been of original Rumanian extraction with a Rumanian viewpoint, then the name would have been Transcarpathia, the Land beyond the Carpathian mountains! Consequently, if Rumanians were already there when the Magyars arrived, then why did they adopt a Magyar name for a region they were native to?

Speculations. The region now called Transylvania was split up in 3 smaller statal structures ruled by Gelu, Glad and Menumorut (according to the Gesta Hungarorum :naughty2:) so obviously there was no name for the entire region. Transylvania was formed by the Hungarians, so it makes sense for the name they gave it to endure.


It is rather Hungarian territories which have been incorporated into Romania. The genuine Rumanian borders stops at the Danube, the Dniestr and the Carpathians.

:yawnee20:

The Ripper
02-18-2011, 06:41 AM
I've met a few Hungarians in my life. They were all, without exception good people, open and friendly and proud of their origins. Good patriots. :)

Foxy
02-18-2011, 06:54 AM
I dunno them, just a person who is going to work there and he described them as lazy and disorganized, with few tourism and almost no economy. That's all what I know about them, plus the fact that they don't speak an I.E. language. So I can't give a vote.

Radola
02-18-2011, 11:04 AM
What do I think about Magyars?
Well, generally we find them quite funny (and ridiculous) - I mean their language (LoL), their "typical" behaviour - they´re said to be quite hot headed.
And It´s a pity that there is no Slovak, I love them speaking about Magyars! :laugh: - for those who not know: Slovaks hate them..with passion :D
But I like their food and some wine - guláš, tokaji, csabai:thumb001:
Moreover we´re part of one "union": V4 - The Visegrád group.

Peerkons
02-18-2011, 11:09 AM
Only thing I know about them that they speak weird language, they were together with Austria, typical Hungarian name is Lazlo, they had nazi puppet state, they have also now many skins/nazionalists and they eat gulash.
Not much. :D

Monolith
02-18-2011, 11:45 AM
Slovaks hate them..with passion :D

Magyars don't like them either, as they have a saying which states that Slovaks are not humans. :D

Radola
02-18-2011, 12:11 PM
Magyars don't like them either, as they have a saying which states that Slovaks are not humans. :D

We (and Slovaks mainly) have the same theory :laugh: ... the theory is that Slovak "fucked" a monkey and threw the "outcome" across Dunaj (The Danube) - thus a creation of Magyars!:thumbs up
Anyway I´ve heard it many times in a reverse order, so who knows:coffee: :laugh:

Harcos
02-19-2011, 12:03 AM
Thank you for the lesson, but, believe it or not, I already new these things.;)



Speculations. The region now called Transylvania was split up in 3 smaller statal structures ruled by Gelu, Glad and Menumorut (according to the Gesta Hungarorum :naughty2:) so obviously there was no name for the entire region. Transylvania was formed by the Hungarians, so it makes sense for the name they gave it to endure.



:yawnee20:

The Gesta Hungarorom is hardly an authentic source for the tenth century as it was written centuries later. There's not even any Rumanian toponomy in Transylvania until the thirteenth century. Vlachs first crossed the Danube north into Cumania from Bulgaria in the twelth centruy, a century later Vlachs were offered asylum by the Hungarian Kingdom after the Turks seized Walachia. It was then Vlach shepherds crossed the Carpathians into Erdély for the first time in history. The present demographic state is due to the Mongol and Turkish wars which decimated the previously rather homogenous Hungarian population.

In Vojvodina for example, Vienna didn't allow Hungarians to resettle those areas, but Serbs, Germans, aswell as Vlachs were settled in their place.

http://i56.tinypic.com/214a6bc.jpg

http://i54.tinypic.com/3028085.jpg

Same thing happened in Transylvania.

If Vlachs lived in present day Romania at that time which the Daco-Romanian myth supporters claim, then why are their no written sources from the Goths, Gepids, Pechenegs et c, that there lived such a people in their land?

Lithium
02-19-2011, 05:17 AM
It may sound weird but I never thought about them as Europeans... I don't like them at all.

Harcos
02-19-2011, 05:46 AM
Says the Bulgar. ;)

Daos
02-19-2011, 06:59 AM
The Gesta Hungarorom is hardly an authentic source for the tenth century as it was written centuries later.

And Anonymus added the Vlachs there for a little spice, right? Do you have another source that claims otherwise?


There's not even any Rumanian toponomy in Transylvania until the thirteenth century.

And how exactly do you prove that a toponym is n centuries old?:noidea: I don't think Vlachs practised writing and I really doubt they had maps back then. And the chances of one surviving would be slim even in the more civilised countries...


Vlachs first crossed the Danube north into Cumania from Bulgaria in the twelth centruy, a century later Vlachs were offered asylum by the Hungarian Kingdom after the Turks seized Walachia. It was then Vlach shepherds crossed the Carpathians into Erdély for the first time in history. The present demographic state is due to the Mongol and Turkish wars which decimated the previously rather homogenous Hungarian population.

According to the Byzantine Kekaumenos (11th century), who knew of clashes between Vlachs in Serbia and the Byzantine authorities, the Vlachs withdrew southwards, to Epirus, Macedonia, and Hellas, and not to the region north of the Danube. An anonymous author at the beginning of the 14th century, supposed to be a French Dominican, was also informed about an emigration of Romanian shepherds from Pannonia towards the Balkans, again from north towards the south.

There is no historical document which attests to some sort of migration of Romanians from the Balkans to the North. For there to be more than 10 million Romanians in the north and less than 1 million in the South means that this supposed "migration" would have been huge, almost as big as the Slavic migrations, yet no one ever mentioned it in history. This is particularly perplexing as this migration supposedly happened from the Byzantine Empire who were the most advanced people of that era, noticing even populations as small as a tribe of 500 Cumans.


In Vojvodina for example, Vienna didn't allow Hungarians to resettle those areas, but Serbs, Germans, aswell as Vlachs were settled in their place.

Same thing happened in Transylvania.

Proof?


If Vlachs lived in present day Romania at that time which the Daco-Romanian myth supporters claim, then why are their no written sources from the Goths, Gepids, Pechenegs et c, that there lived such a people in their land?

How much of the Gothic writings have survived? And are there any writings left by the Gepids or Pechenegs?:confused:

Lithium
02-19-2011, 06:59 AM
Bulgarian*

Dario Argento
02-22-2011, 02:24 AM
It may sound weird but I never thought about them as Europeans... I don't like them at all.

Your ancestors spoke Turkic, bulgar.

Guapo
02-22-2011, 02:36 AM
Your ancestors spoke Turkic, bulgar.

So did yours, Homo Pannonicus.

Dario Argento
02-22-2011, 02:37 AM
So did yours, Homo Pannonicus.

No. Hungarian is Uralic. Do you think Finns are Turk too Homo Ex-Kosoves?

Guapo
02-22-2011, 02:39 AM
Anthropologist Lajos Bartucz wrote: the Alföldi (Homo pannonicus) type is called the "Turkic Hungarian type" :coffee:

Lithium
02-22-2011, 02:40 AM
My ancestors weren't Turkic. Don't talk to me about MY ancestors.

Guapo
02-22-2011, 02:56 AM
My ancestors weren't Turkic. Don't talk to me about MY ancestors.

Your ancestors were homesick therefore wrote sonnets about it.

Adalwolf
02-22-2011, 03:45 AM
I admire the Hungarian nation for a number of reasons. For one, they were the only country that remained loyal to Germany until the very bitter end of WW2. Also, during the middle ages, the fought a number of battles defending their homeland from the Turks.

Guapo
02-22-2011, 12:32 PM
Wow...

Peerkons
02-22-2011, 04:53 PM
4LIFE!
http://knivirtuve.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/bucharest_ikarus_bus_628.jpg

Blossom
02-22-2011, 04:59 PM
4LIFE!
http://knivirtuve.files.wordpress.com/2011/02/bucharest_ikarus_bus_628.jpg

Eriks...that's not Budapest, that's Bucharest. :lol: I've been there and still remember that bus lol...so freaking cold on winter.

Peerkons
02-22-2011, 05:03 PM
nothing beats IKARUS gasoline smell
mmmm
http://www.lotek.lv/images/korektors5.jpg
http://www.brivi.lv/photos/BP-Degvielas_kanna_10l-2089622551.jpg
^best shit

Adalwolf
02-22-2011, 07:30 PM
By the way, I have nothing but positive things to say about Hungarian woman. :thumb001:

Harcos
02-23-2011, 07:52 AM
...

There is no mention of these dukes of Transylvania other than in the Gesta Hungarorum, there is no other trace of these rather insignificant characters because they are made up. On the side of this, the author completely ignored very prominenet characters who were actually very engaged with the Magyar conquest, such as the Emperor of the Franks, the Emperor of Byzantium, the Czar of Bulgaria et c, something a trustworthy historian would not fail to mention. It's in a most likelyhood that Anonymous was led into confusion by Slavic accounts on the period, as they called the Franks, who at time were present in Pannonia as Voloch/Vlasi. The authour also mentioned the Cumans to have been present in Pannonia, but such a claim aswell as the presence of Vlachs is anything but historical truth. There was Slavs, Avars, Seklers, Franks, Gepids but no Cumans, and with all certainty no 'Daco-romans'.

The extraordinary claim that Vlachs somehow were present north of the Danube since the Roman conquest is highly improbable in itself. But that these people also survived the centuries of Goths, Huns, Gepidae, Avars, Slavs, Bulgarians, Pechenegs and Cumans to present day, without any of them ever meantioning your presence in their land is close to impossible. One would also think that the overall significant Gothic presence would have left just some Germanic influence on your language, but there's none. The most reasonable explanation to this would be that you weren't present there in those times. If this Romanisation of Dacia was so immense that you forgot your heritage and language in just over a century, then why is there no significant Roman archaelogical remains found in Wallachia or Transylvania to validate this?

Vlach language prior to it's purge of foreign influences in the 19th century and renamed 'Rumanian' showed clear Bulgarian origin for more than half or your dictionary, you also officially wrote in Cyrillic form untill this Daco-Romanian revisionism took place. You are also surprisingly, or perhaps not so, the only traditional Romance people who is not Catholic, but Orthodox! A majority of your Christian terminology is still of Bulgarian extraction. It should also be noted that the liturgical language of the Rumanian church was Old Church Slavonic until the 18th century. This alone is proof enough that you were christianised within the Bulgarian empire, or within a MAJOR ( !!! ) influence of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church.

http://i53.tinypic.com/kb58n5.jpg

There's nothing wrong with embracing your true heritage.

Monolith
02-23-2011, 02:10 PM
It's in a most likelyhood that Anonymous was led into confusion by Slavic accounts on the period, as they called the Franks, who at time were present in Pannonia as Voloch/Vlasi.
I thought 'Wallach' was a Germanic borrowing into (proto)Slavic, used for designating Romance-speaking populations. Why would the Slavs call the Germanic Franks that way?

Harcos
02-23-2011, 03:16 PM
I thought 'Wallach' was a Germanic borrowing into (proto)Slavic, used for designating Romance-speaking populations. Why would the Slavs call the Germanic Franks that way?

The orinal meaning of the word was a term applied to not for Romance people but for Celts, which can be seen with the English name for Wales. But since most Celts were Romanised ( Gauls, Celtiberians et c. ) and adopted a Romance tongue, the term was later applied to mostly Romance speaking populations meaning 'Roman-like' in essence. Since the Franks were Roman Catholic and therefore 'Roman-like' the Franks in the Balkan region were sometimes called Blach which lead to the Slav names Voloch/Vlasi.

Monolith
02-23-2011, 06:32 PM
the Franks in the Balkan region were sometimes called Blach which lead to the Slav names Voloch/Vlasi.
Very interesting. Do you have some source to corroborate that?

Germanicus
02-23-2011, 09:18 PM
The Hungary that my Grandfather knew he learnt all about when he joined the British Army in 1916; my knowledge of Hungary is non existent.:(


The explosive that was World War One had been long in the stockpiling; the spark was the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, in Sarajevo on 28 June 1914.

Ferdinand's death at the hands of the Black Hand, a Serbian nationalist secret society, set in train a mindlessly mechanical series of events that culminated in the world's first global war.

From that war my paternal grandfather came back from unscathed.:)

Daos
02-24-2011, 06:03 AM
If this Romanisation of Dacia was so immense that you forgot your heritage and language in just over a century, then why is there no significant Roman archaelogical remains found in Wallachia or Transylvania to validate this?

Define significant. We have Sarmizegetusa Ulpia Traiana (http://ro.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ulpia_Traiana_Sarmizegetusa), the capital of the Roman province of Dacia, numerous Roman towns, including the predecessors of towns that exist today, like: Colonia Aurelia Apulensis and Colonia Nova Apulensis (now Alba Iulia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alba_Iulia)) and Municipium Aelium Hadrianum Napoca (now Cluj-Napoca (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cluj-Napoca)), which today are some of the largest cities in Transylvania, and smaller towns like: Ampelum (now Zlatna) and Potaissa (now Turda), plus a lot of castra (http://ro.wikipedia.org/wiki/List%C4%83_de_castre_romane_din_Rom%C3%A2nia): Ad Pannonios, Micia, Optatiana, Porolissum, etc. Then there's Trajan's Bridge (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trajan%27s_Bridge)...


Vlach language prior to it's purge of foreign influences in the 19th century and renamed 'Rumanian' showed clear Bulgarian origin for more than half or your dictionary, you also officially wrote in Cyrillic form untill this Daco-Romanian revisionism took place. You are also surprisingly, or perhaps not so, the only traditional Romance people who is not Catholic, but Orthodox! A majority of your Christian terminology is still of Bulgarian extraction. It should also be noted that the liturgical language of the Rumanian church was Old Church Slavonic until the 18th century. This alone is proof enough that you were christianised within the Bulgarian empire, or within a MAJOR ( !!! ) influence of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church.

Wait... what?:confused: Please, do tell, how did they achieve such performance as to „purge” the language of millions of people (mostly peasants), including in Transylvania (which was a part of Hungary at that time)! What DID happen in the 19th century, was the loaning of many neologisms of French and Italian origin, which constitute around 38% of modern standard Romanian. The real tragedy happened in modern times (and is still on-going), the homogenisation of the Romanian language - even peasants start speaking the standard Romanian...:cry2

Yes, the Cyrillic alphabet was used until the mid-19th century, but I don't see your point, because even your average Romanian could understand what it says if you read such a text to him.

Around the year 990, the Byzantine rite was implemented and that meant that many of the older terms were forgotten in time, however a few like Dumnezeu (Dominus Deus) lived on. However, implying that Romanians lived south of the Danube because of this, is like saying Hungarians lived in Italy because their liturgical language was Latin...


There's nothing wrong with embracing your true heritage.

Problem is that Hungarians like you want us to „embrace our true heritage” in order to get rid of one more (I dare say small) obstacle in their claim for Transylvania. However, we don't need the continuity theory to be true in order to have claims on Transylvania.;)

Harcos
02-24-2011, 09:00 AM
Since Dacia was only partially occupied for just 165 years, which was a relatively short period compared to other areas such as Britannia were Latin didn't survive, that this would somehow be enough for a proud, stalwart warrior people to abondon their roots and adopt those of the conquerors whom they despised. Due to the state of things, I'd expect something similiar to the awe of Colosseum scattered across Wallachia and Transylvania in hundreds, but all you have is a few dubios toponyms and a bridge across the Duna.

So why did this loaning of French, and Italian words happen and what pre-existing words, names and toponyms did they replace, and what was the reason for this, just for the sake of it? This is called the 're-Latinisation' of Rumanian, ( or more correctly the Latinisation as it was not a return to a previous situation ) which purged most Rumanian words of Slavic and other external origins and replaced them with more favourable Latin ones.

The point is, you obviously aquired this form of writing from somewhere, and this place was Bulgaria. Romanian was not a written language untill you became a part of the Bulgarian empire, it was here you first got your alphabet, your Orthodox religion and where your language got it's heavy Slavic characteristics. This is proof of you having been educated by the Bulgarian Orthodox Church. If you however were the mythical descendants of these radically Romanised Dacians and Roman settlers, then one would think you would have kept your Latin form of scripture and not adopted an alien one. If the Daco-Roman continuity theory was indeed true, you'd have been Roman-Catholic, used the Latin alphabet and a huge part of your vocabulary would not have been of Bulgarian origin. All documents about Vlachs prior to the 12th century mentions you being south of the Danube, not north. All proof points towards you having been present in Bulgaria, the language, the religion, the alphabet. This Daco-Roman continuity theory is just romantic nationalism, it is not based on anything real. You are living a lie, your official historical origin is based on lies and wishful thinking with the belief that is anything but historical truth.

Since you have been present in Transylvania since the 13th century, and have contributed to the land of which you dwell, you do indeed have the right to have claims on Transylvania, after all, all people originate from somewhere. But to base your claims on something but is historical and documented, and to claim that Hungary incorporated Rumanian territories is just blatant lies. I see Transylvania as a genuine part of my homeland, and I wish her to reunite with Hungary in the future, regardless of the present demographic state. I wouldn't seek forth to expell the Vlachs living there, I'd even give you cultural and linguistic autonomy, something you unrightfully denies to the Seklers who's been present there since the time of Attila. I do not approve of the extensive Magyarisation of non-Magyars that took place, but on the other hand I can't blame them either. Centuries of warfare had dramatically changed the homogenous demographics of Hungary and Magyars had become the minority in their own land so radical countermeasurements had to take place. While the tactic was not favourable, something had to be done to ensure the integrity of the nation.

I wish to see the Carpathian lands reunited where all productive people of all ethnicities would have their say, we have been one for a milennia and there's no reason why we couldn't again. Parties such as Noua Dreapta, the SNS aswell as Jobbik doesn't help to enstablish Carpathian stability however, let alone Carpathian unity..

Transylvania aside, by looking at your signature, ' Long live Greater Rumania to the river Tisza and beyond', what do you base your justification for the right of those lands?

Harcos
02-24-2011, 09:03 AM
Very interesting. Do you have some source to corroborate that?

A neutral research regarding the origin of Vlachs.

http://www.imninalu.net/myths-Vlach.htm

I noticed Arrow Cross linked it a few pages ago too.

Daos
02-24-2011, 11:52 AM
Due to the state of things, I'd expect something similiar to the awe of Colosseum scattered across Wallachia and Transylvania in hundreds, but all you have is a few dubios toponyms and a bridge across the Duna.

Dubious toponyms? What about the physical evidence accompanied by them?


So why did this loaning of French, and Italian words happen and what pre-existing words, names and toponyms did they replace, and what was the reason for this, just for the sake of it?

I assume it was a similar process to the one we experience today, only with English words. One note though: no toponym was replaced...:rolleyes:


This is called the 're-Latinisation' of Rumanian, ( or more correctly the Latinisation as it was not a return to a previous situation ) which purged most Rumanian words of Slavic and other external origins and replaced them with more favourable Latin ones.

Yes, we are teh masturz of linguage. We changed the language millions of people in different countries spoke, in a century!:thumb001:


The point is, you obviously aquired this form of writing from somewhere, and this place was Bulgaria. Romanian was not a written language untill you became a part of the Bulgarian empire, it was here you first got your alphabet, your Orthodox religion and where your language got it's heavy Slavic characteristics. This is proof of you having been educated by the Bulgarian Orthodox Church.

Educated by the Bulgarian Orthodox Church... How many people do you think practised writing at that time?


If you however were the mythical descendants of these radically Romanised Dacians and Roman settlers, then one would think you would have kept your Latin form of scripture and not adopted an alien one.

How many Dacians do you think knew how to write?


I see Transylvania as a genuine part of my homeland, and I wish her to reunite with Hungary in the future, regardless of the present demographic state. I wouldn't seek forth to expell the Vlachs living there, I'd even give you cultural and linguistic autonomy, something you unrightfully denies to the Seklers who's been present there since the time of Attila. I do not approve of the extensive Magyarisation of non-Magyars that took place, but on the other hand I can't blame them either.

You, sir, are a bloody imperialist! As for the Secui, they're doing fine, the way I see it, much better than Transylvanian Romanians did for centuries...

You know what? I'll play along. Let's say you are right: After the Aurelian retreat our lands were left barren, then Slavs and later Hungarians came along, later we migrated north over the Danube and then into Transylvania and hundred of years later we took our lands back.

http://www.theapricity.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=7219&stc=1&d=1298551596


Transylvania aside, by looking at your signature, ' Long live Greater Rumania to the river Tisza and beyond', what do you base your justification for the right of those lands?

After 1918 many Romanians from Maramureș found themselves separated from their relatives by the Tisa. At the Great Union (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Union_of_Transylvania_with_Romania) in Alba Iulia people would shout „Long live Greater Romania from the Nistru to the Tisa!” and those who were left to Czechoslovakia shouted „Long live Greater Romania from the Nistru to beyond the Tisa!”.

Harcos
02-24-2011, 12:18 PM
Oh stop it, now you're just being ridiculous. Such double-standards, there was only a few thousand Vlachs between Parcium and the Tisza prior to Trianon, on the other hand there were 1,7 milion ( 32% ) Magyars in Transylvania who found themselves seperated from Hungary for the first time in history.

You're from Nagybánya aren't you, that old Magyar town.

JksfUu1Wp_0

http://i55.tinypic.com/213m6fb.jpg

Where's the Rumanians? :icon_ask: :rolleyes:

Guapo
02-24-2011, 02:06 PM
Um, Romanians are the indigenous to Dacia, genetics proves it. All base belong to tehm.

Harcos
02-24-2011, 02:21 PM
So? Hungarians cluster with Germans genetically, that doesn't mean we have any right to claim heritage from old Germanian tribes. An ethnicity/folk is a social construct not biological.

Daos
02-24-2011, 05:15 PM
Oh stop it, now you're just being ridiculous. Such double-standards, there was only a few thousand Vlachs between Parcium and the Tisza prior to Trianon, on the other hand there were 1,7 milion ( 32% ) Magyars in Transylvania who found themselves seperated from Hungary for the first time in history.

Partium? I wasn't talking about Crișana, but about Maramureș. Here's a map of the Tisa river (and southern part of the Danube):

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/79/Thiz_river.jpg/300px-Thiz_river.jpg

As you can see, Hungary doesn't own it.


You're from Nagybánya aren't you, that old Magyar town.

Nay, my parents moved into town when I was 4, I'm from a nearby village.

JksfUu1Wp_0

Nice video, I'll make sure to show it to my grandparents.:thumb001: Horthysts, eh? His troops committed massacres in many villages (http://ro.wikipedia.org/wiki/Masacre_%C3%AEn_Transilvania_de_Nord,_1940-1944). As for Lendvay's statue, it's now safely hidden in the Regina Maria park.;)


http://i55.tinypic.com/213m6fb.jpg

Where's the Rumanians? :icon_ask: :rolleyes:

In the villages, where we belong!;) But where are the Hungarians now?:dunno:

http://a3.twimg.com/profile_images/1193569523/TrollFace-1_normal.png

Osweo
02-24-2011, 07:09 PM
Slavs in the good old days called the Franks 'Fryazy' I thought... Volokhi was for the older Romanised inhabitants of the Latin part of the Imperium.

I do think that the crossing of the Danube in the Dark Ages is the only realistic way to explain the modern Rumanians, mind. Continuity of Roman speech in Wallachia (never mind Transylvania) is far too hard to countenance, given the disruptions of the times.

Harcos
02-24-2011, 08:01 PM
Horthysts, eh? His troops committed massacres in many villages (http://ro.wikipedia.org/wiki/Masacre_%C3%AEn_Transilvania_de_Nord,_1940-1944). As for Lendvay's statue, it's now safely hidden in the Regina Maria park.;)

I do know about the atrocities commited by the Horthyite regime. While I appreciate Horthy for saving Hungary from the Communists/Jews and regaining lost territory, I'm by no means a Horthyite. Horthy was a chauvinist ( like you ), not a nationalist. Szálasi didn't approve of this re-Magyarisation continuity process promoted by Horthyite reactionary circles, if he'd got to power in Hungary a bit earlier none of the massacres or other crimes would of taken place against Rumanians or other minorities.


In the villages, where we belong!;) But where are the Hungarians now?:dunno:
http://a3.twimg.com/profile_images/1193569523/TrollFace-1_normal.png

I don't know, either Rumanianised, expelled or perhaps killed. This is not just in Nagybánya but in all major Transylvanian cities that used to have a Magyar majority.. Kolozsvár, Máramarossziget, Nagyvárad, Szatmárnémeti, Beszterce, Nagykároly and so on, and even Marosvásarhely, the Sekler capital has a Vlach majority today, Sepsiszentgyörgy is going the same way.. The Magyar population was 32% in present-day Transylvania in 1910, now it has plummeted to 19% and continues to decrease. That you find this amusing while condoning the massacres carried out by the Horthyite regime is hypocrisy.

If you say you belong in the villages, then why don't you go back there and leave the poor Magyar minority in the city alone?


Nay, my parents moved into town when I was 4, I'm from a nearby village.

Surely to replace the ever-decreasing Magyar population, no?

Harcos
02-24-2011, 08:13 PM
Slavs in the good old days called the Franks 'Fryazy' I thought... Volokhi was for the older Romanised inhabitants of the Latin part of the Imperium.

Aye, I guess you have a higher knowledge on the topic than I do. I just repeated what I understood from my source.

Daos
02-25-2011, 04:14 AM
I don't know, either Rumanianised, expelled or perhaps killed.

You must be out of your mind! The only expelled people were the Germans.


If you say you belong in the villages, then why don't you go back there and leave the poor Magyar minority in the city alone?

As a matter of fact, I intend to, but I don't see how that will affect the Hungarians...


Surely to replace the ever-decreasing Magyar population, no?

Everything is a conspiracy with you, isn't it? Ever heard of the process of urbanisation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urbanisation)? The commies loved it!

I just noticed what your age is (Age: 18) and that explains a lot! Should have known better than to argue with a kid...:tsk:

Harcos
02-25-2011, 06:19 AM
Ofcourse, the age thing. What does my age have to do with anything? You aren't that much older yourself.

I don't use the word conspiracy. Conspiracy is a word used by the mainstream to ridicule anything of importance which would be against it's interest.

With originally 32% Magyars in Transylvania, and just 19% of them left. With only a few cities in Transylvania retaining a Magyar majority, one would think something has happened demographically, no?

The Rumanian government has been engaged in ethnic cleansing, anti-Hungarian discrimination, many were forcibly expelled, assimilated and had their property confiscated. Still today the Rumanian authorities promote the settlement of Rumanians from other parts of the country in Transylvania as a concious policy to reduce the magnitude of Magyars, but ofcourse they deny this like the Jews they are. Atleast Noua Dreapta is honest with their intentions to the Hungarian minority.

safinator
06-27-2011, 06:37 PM
I had an Hungarian girlfriend in high school so i like them :D:D

Sikeliot
06-27-2011, 06:42 PM
I have no feelings either way about them.

Lucretius
06-27-2011, 06:42 PM
Well I've never known any Hungarian,the only two are people ver famous, I'm talking about Mr Attila Csihar who I admire very much and the beautiful actress Eva Henger ;)

hajduk
06-29-2011, 05:55 PM
I like them

Guapo
06-30-2011, 08:46 PM
the Scourge of God

BeerBaron
06-30-2011, 08:55 PM
The only thing I know about them is their girls tend to be good looking, so thats a thumbs up from me:thumb001:

Laubach
07-03-2011, 07:35 PM
I like the Hungarians I met when I visited Budapest. They were very polite and attentive. Only the language is very complicated

Logan
07-03-2011, 07:45 PM
Cultural differences aside we are all much the same.

Amapola
07-27-2011, 12:25 PM
http://andaluciacarlista.com/wp-content/uploads/Hungria-escudo.jpg

I like Hungary for being the wart on the tipnose of the European Union (which is always positive). It's great they passed that New Constitution which fundamental core is the recognition of their traditional Christian roots of the country, the defense of the marriage made up by man and woman, the educational freedom and of life and human dignity, the right to a legitimate defense, the protection of private property, the banning of eugenesia and the establishment of the life imprisonment as maximum sentence with no chance of parole.

Hungary doesn't only break with its Communist past but brings back some basic and historical Western values that the rest of "democratic" countries tends to forget.

Vivian Reding of course protested and if not "changed" the EU will take all the necessary steps to stop this, but the Hungarian PM said that then Hungary would also take the necessary steps! Olé mister Orban for not letting others interfernig in your own country matters!

:bow00002:

Andr
08-18-2011, 07:25 PM
Why do they need to lie to defend their historical claims?

dead_scream89
08-25-2011, 05:46 AM
I love he Hungarians they are kind friendly people wish i could say the same things about their neighbours :S

LouisFerdinand
02-25-2018, 02:13 AM
I like Hungarians.

Mortimer
02-25-2018, 02:32 AM
I like them. My fathers brother wife is hungarian now widow but we still have contact and are like family. She is vojvodina hungarian. I like also hungarian food and I like their language. Unfortunately I dont speak it but if I lived longer in Vojvodina maybe I would be better speaking hungarian because when I was a baby a elder hungarian couple took care of me while my parents worked and they spoke in hungarian to me. Also my dad spoke hungarian and his brother, and the hungarian wife of his brother of course. My paternal cousins also speak hungarian.

Bobby Martnen
02-25-2018, 02:52 AM
I don't really know any.

blogen
03-03-2018, 07:45 AM
http://www.kepfeltoltes.eu/images/hdd1/2018/01/18/368pajOoHv.png

Bobby Martnen
03-03-2018, 08:18 AM
Never met one IRL but the ones here seem cool

TheForeigner
03-03-2018, 08:26 AM
I don't either like them, nor dislike them, but I don't get why they hate Romania and Romanians so much.

Agrippina
03-03-2018, 08:37 AM
I don't either like them, nor dislike them, but I don't get why they hate Romania and Romanians so much.

It's mostly about the bitter feud over Transylvania.
Not all of them hate Romanians, but the ones that do hate us are the loudest. The same applies for Romanians.

Tom Cat
03-03-2018, 08:51 AM
Why should I not like Hungarians in general?

I do know one beautiful Hungarian lady I do like very much. And the feeling is mutual. :hug2:

someonenotyou
03-28-2018, 02:02 AM
We are bastards and proud of it!