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Äike
08-12-2010, 05:27 PM
Estonian Public Broadcasting launches news in English (http://balticbusinessnews.com/article/2010/08/10/Estonian_Public_Broadcasting_launches_news_in_Engl ish)

Eesti Rahvusringhääling (Estonian Public Broadcasting) launched the English-language news portal ERR News this week.

The service is free and available at http://news.err.ee/

The editor of ERR News, Scott Diel, said that the mission of ERR News is to offer an English-language window to Estonia. "We will offer translations supplemented with background and context for foreign readers, plus a fair helping of original content. And not only will we provide a picture of what is happening in Estonia to the abroad, but we’ll also serve as a platform for when Estonians wish to say something to more than just their fellow countrymen. And we hope to do both those things at the highest professional standard."

nisse
08-12-2010, 09:07 PM
I don't think that's a terribly strong motivation :|

How many people read the news of foreign countries, esp. if they are not even close enough to the country to know its language? Few. I think this will be wasted, although it might get some Estonian readership in people who want to learn/practice their English.

Just another sign of globalization :cry

The Ripper
08-13-2010, 05:43 AM
I don't think that's a terribly strong motivation :|

How many people read the news of foreign countries, esp. if they are not even close enough to the country to know its language? Few.

Foreigners living in the country and foreigners who are interested in the country. And I'm guessing that a very small fraction of Latvians and Russians understand Estonian, no matter how close to it they live. ;)

nisse
08-13-2010, 12:25 PM
Foreigners living in the country and foreigners who are interested in the country. And I'm guessing that a very small fraction of Latvians and Russians understand Estonian, no matter how close to it they live. ;)

But to live in Estonia they must speak at least one of the common languages - if not Estonian, than Russian. Would make more sense for them to read Estonian news in Russian ...if there is such a thing (and there is such a thing from unofficial sources for sure)...and if there isn't, it would make more sense for the news to be translated to Russian before English.

As for people coming to the country, they have so much to catch up on, the latest headlines are not likely to interest them too much IMO. Even in a relatively large country like Sweden there's hardly anything of interest worth reading in the daily news, historical information and expat accounts are a lot more useful to potential visitors.

Good for them for taking the initiative, but still seems like a waste to me. :shrug:

The Ripper
08-14-2010, 10:33 AM
But to live in Estonia they must speak at least one of the common languages - if not Estonian, than Russian. Would make more sense for them to read Estonian news in Russian ...if there is such a thing (and there is such a thing from unofficial sources for sure)...and if there isn't, it would make more sense for the news to be translated to Russian before English.

I don't see why they would have to speak either Russian or Estonian. I have plenty of expat friends and acquaintances living in Finland that have never learned the language beyond some rudimentary phrases. Its not uncommon, especially for western/anglo expats. I would imagine that the difficult language makes the situation similar in Estonia.


Good for them for taking the initiative, but still seems like a waste to me. :shrug:

Its a waste to translate Estonian news into English? I don't see what's being wasted. It offers a service that probably doesn't require too much in terms of material resources, seeing as it is online. Most countries have broadcasting agencies providing news in several different languages. I have a feeling you just like to be negative towards Estonia in Karl's threads. :D

Tell me it ain't so. ;)

W. R.
08-14-2010, 11:17 AM
Lol at the top news (http://news.err.ee/Politics/78804456-42e6-4696-b2e7-4bdd59a9f8d8). Socialists are mad at another politician who had an uncontrolled fit of sincerity. :biggrin:

EWtt
08-14-2010, 11:49 AM
This site is indeed intended to make Estonian news internationally available and for the English-speaking people who live, work or study in Estonia, as well as the foreigners who are just interested in what's going on in Estonia. I think a reader commented how she had to run Estonian news through Google Translate. Some of the editors of the site are Americans who live in Estonia and speak Estonian, including the guy behind the site's development.

Russians have their own local media outlets and a couple of larger Estonian news sites have a Russian version as well. However, plenty of Russians only rely on the Kremlin's media which obviously has an agenda when it comes to Estonia and sometimes international media picked up on Russia's news about Estonia - Estonia really didn't have an outside-oriented news site quite like this before.

nisse
08-14-2010, 10:43 PM
I don't see why they would have to speak either Russian or Estonian. I have plenty of expat friends and acquaintances living in Finland that have never learned the language beyond some rudimentary phrases. Its not uncommon, especially for western/anglo expats. I would imagine that the difficult language makes the situation similar in Estonia.
Just that when I was there (Tallinn) as a tourist, English was nowhere as prevalent as it was in places like Stockholm or Helsinki. My impression, I could be wrong :ohwell:.


Its a waste to translate Estonian news into English? I don't see what's being wasted.
Time (and thus money). The amount of readership it'll get (IMO) will not justify the time.


Most countries have broadcasting agencies providing news in several different languages.
In Canada it's only French and English (official languages), anything in other languages is far from comprehensive. In US it's English and Spanish. In Ukriane it's Ukrainian and some times Russian. Not a terribly wide sampling, I know, but I haven't yet come across a major public broadcaster's website that went too far out of the way to accomodate speakers of non-official languages...


I have a feeling you just like to be negative towards Estonia in Karl's threads. :D

Tell me it ain't so. ;)
It ain't so :P
Actually the reason I replied to this was my dislike of all things globalist (even though that plays in my favour more often than not). I think this globalism pure and simple :(.

esaima
08-14-2010, 11:48 PM
Good news.If i need some more positive and Nordic posts about how good government we have i can now just copy and paste.

ikki
08-15-2010, 12:50 AM
Foreigners living in the country and foreigners who are interested in the country. And I'm guessing that a very small fraction of Latvians and Russians understand Estonian, no matter how close to it they live. ;)

or meant for the other scandinavian countries that may be looking for a place to invest :p ..and thus lowering the step, when getting to know something more than just the mere basics or what can be found on wikipedia.

nisse
08-15-2010, 03:15 AM
or meant for [] countries that may be looking for a place to invest :p ..and thus
...saying that they'll bend over backwards to get the investment money :rolleyes2:.

I actually agree with this analysis (-ish), but don't think that the role of this service is to make Estonian news more accessible. Companies have huge resources (not just wiki ;)) when they are researching a new market/investment opportunity, and would def. hire a specialist who speaks the language if they are serious and have serious cash to invest. This translated news would be near useless to them. I think this is a symbolic gesture saying that Estonia is accomodating to foreign businesses.

This is trying to encourage a global market, and while I see the economic benefits of it and why it no doubt looks appealing, the more integrated any country becomes with the "world" the more they have to answer to moral authorities such as the UN and governments of other countries (who really shouldn't be talking, in many cases)...the more concessions (such as wasting their money translating news few will ever read) they make to accommodate foreign investment, the less power they'll have in their own market. They are making themselves look like the nice guy...but everyone knows nice guys finish last :(.

RoyBatty
08-15-2010, 06:55 AM
...saying that they'll bend over backwards to get the investment money :rolleyes2:.

I actually agree with this analysis (-ish), but don't think that the role of this service is to make Estonian news more accessible. Companies have huge resources (not just wiki ;)) when they are researching a new market/investment opportunity, and would def. hire a specialist who speaks the language if they are serious and have serious cash to invest. This translated news would be near useless to them. I think this is a symbolic gesture saying that Estonia is accomodating to foreign businesses.

This is trying to encourage a global market, and while I see the economic benefits of it and why it no doubt looks appealing, the more integrated any country becomes with the "world" the more they have to answer to moral authorities such as the UN and governments of other countries (who really shouldn't be talking, in many cases)...the more concessions (such as wasting their money translating news few will ever read) they make to accommodate foreign investment, the less power they'll have in their own market. They are making themselves look like the nice guy...but everyone knows nice guys finish last :(.

Nice guys finish last!! :thumbs up

Also, the more one integrates one's countries into EU, UN, "Trans-Atlantic" ang "global" structures, the more you feed the multiculturalisation and globalisation process.

In layman's terms, this will only serve to hasten the demise of Estonian national identity and independence and encourage foreign influence and authority.

Yes we've all heard from Karl how "Estonian Nationalists will never let this happen" at the voting polls but guess what.... they already are allowing it to happen through integration into "global" structures such as the ones already mentioned.

Preservation = Isolating one's country and limiting outside influence, not encouraging it.

Äike
08-15-2010, 02:46 PM
Just that when I was there (Tallinn) as a tourist, English was nowhere as prevalent as it was in places like Stockholm or Helsinki. My impression, I could be wrong :ohwell:.

Define prevalent. If you mean that the majority of tourists spoke Finnish, Swedish, Russian and German, instead of English, then I know what you mean.




Yes we've all heard from Karl how "Estonian Nationalists will never let this happen" at the voting polls but guess what.... they already are allowing it to happen through integration into "global" structures such as the ones already mentioned.

Preservation = Isolating one's country and limiting outside influence, not encouraging it.

Young Socialists Rebuke Minister for Intolerance (http://news.err.ee/Politics/78804456-42e6-4696-b2e7-4bdd59a9f8d8)

Estonia will not follow in the footsteps of the Netherlands and promote gay marriage in textbooks, Minister of Education and Research Tõnis Lukas declared yesterday at a cabinet press conference, sparking a fiery response from the Social Democrats' youth section.

According to the television news program Aktuaalne Kaamera, Lukas said that Estonia should not adopt the western world's "extinction strategies" in its educational materials.

The minister jokingly said that he expects someone to soon call for rewriting the classic children's novel Kevade (Spring) so that the schoolboys would be dating each other instead of their co-eds.
The remark was met with severe criticism by the Social Democratic Party's youth section who argued that this proves Lukas unfit for the position.

"I feel ashamed personally along with the whole organization of the Young Social Democrats that we have someone with such a narrow-minded, intolerant and inane outlook as the education minister in Estonia," said Gerd Tarand, policy coordinator of the Young Social Democrats.

The Young Social Democrats pledged to initiate a no confidence vote against Lukas in parliament at the first opportunity.



......

Estonians can just vote for him. I do not know about the UK, but not all politicians here are spineless and think only about making themselves rich.

nisse
08-16-2010, 12:09 PM
Define prevalent. If you mean that the majority of tourists spoke Finnish, Swedish, Russian and German, instead of English, then I know what you mean.
Meaning number of natives fluent in English. "Prevalent" would be the same level as in Oslo or Helsinki. I think we discussed this previously, but the bottom line is that despite all those languages Estonians apparently learn, me and my friends found that not nearly as many people spoke English in Tallinn as in other Northern countries :shrug:.


Estonians can just vote for him. I do not know about the UK, but not all politicians here are spineless and think only about making themselves rich.

Isn't your prime minister a former communist party official? i.e. turncoat, i.e. probably just interested in power and money?

Äike
08-16-2010, 12:32 PM
Meaning number of natives fluent in English. "Prevalent" would be the same level as in Oslo or Helsinki. I think we discussed this previously, but the bottom line is that despite all those languages Estonians apparently learn, me and my friends found that not nearly as many people spoke English in Tallinn as in other Northern countries :shrug:.

You should have spoken Russian to those uneducated russkies. The Russian school system here has some flaws. I do not know any Estonians below the age of 40 who do not speak English.

When you look at older generations and compare Estonia with countries who weren't part of the USSR. Then Estonians belonging into older generations, do not speak English.


Isn't your prime minister a former communist party official? i.e. turncoat, i.e. probably just interested in power and money?

He belonged into the communist party, but the minister of education belongs to a different political party which has no former communists.

EWtt
08-16-2010, 12:46 PM
When you look at older generations and compare Estonia with countries who weren't part of the USSR. Then Estonians belonging into older generations, do not speak English.

Indeed, older generations typically learned Russian and German instead of English, and sometimes also Finnish (Northern Estonians saw Finnish TV).