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View Full Version : Korean War promo ad sparks outrage in China



zhaoyun
09-15-2016, 06:23 AM
Advertisement promoting a Chinese made film about the Korean War depicts a bus of elderly Chinese tourists in Korea, bragging that they did not need a passport the first time they came to Seoul (as part of a war troop).

Unexpectedly, the ad causes outrage among many Chinese youth who now overwhelmingly side with South Korea over North Korea, and represents a huge disconnect between public sentiment and the government's continued ties with North Korea.

http://chinadigitaltimes.net/2016/09/ad-korean-war-film-offends-netizens/

Selurong
09-15-2016, 06:42 AM
Advertisement promoting a Chinese made film about the Korean War depicts a bus of elderly Chinese tourists in Korea, bragging that they did not need a passport the first time they came to Seoul (as part of a war troop).

Unexpectedly, the ad causes outrage among many Chinese youth who now overwhelmingly side with South Korea over North Korea, and represents a huge disconnect between public sentiment and the government's continued ties with North Korea.

http://chinadigitaltimes.net/2016/09/ad-korean-war-film-offends-netizens/

Does this mean that young Chinese people these days are more open and more politically aware than their elders?

zhaoyun
09-15-2016, 06:47 AM
Does this mean that Chinese people these days are more open and more politically aware than their elders?

Is this a serious question? There's a huge cultural gap between the young people in China and the old, they grew up in two totally different countries.

Also, the young are exposed to a lot of South Korean pop culture. Many South Koreans study, work and live in China. There is a lot of trade and cross national investment by Chinese and Korean companies. North Korea is pretty much non-existent except for some refugees in border cities of Northeast China.

So obviously, the young feel ties with South Korea and they see North Korea as some weird pitiful pariah. The elderly feel ties to North Korea because of the past, but modern China is much closer to South Korea in cultural and economic ties and lifestyle, so that's changed public opinion greatly.

Selurong
09-15-2016, 07:01 AM
Is this a serious question? There's a huge cultural gap between the young people in China and the old, they grew up in two totally different countries.

Also, the young are exposed to a lot of South Korean pop culture. Many South Koreans study, work and live in China. There is a lot of trade and cross national investment by Chinese and Korean companies. North Korea is pretty much non-existent except for some refugees in border cities of Northeast China.

So obviously, the young feel ties with South Korea and they see North Korea as some weird pitiful pariah. The elderly feel ties to North Korea because of the past, but modern China is much closer to South Korea in cultural and economic ties and lifestyle, so that's changed public opinion greatly.

Yeah I agree with that, and also, that ad is just downright distasteful, no matter what nationality one belongs to.

zhaoyun
09-15-2016, 07:05 AM
Yeah I agree with that, and also, that ad is just downright distasteful, no matter what nationality one belongs to.

Yeah, it's completely idiotic.

Charles Bronson
09-15-2016, 07:14 AM
Yasasin Turan!

Selurong
09-15-2016, 07:21 AM
Yasasin Turan!

Ohhkaaay. What has that got to do with the topic at hand?

Charles Bronson
09-15-2016, 07:22 AM
Ohhkaaay. What has that got to do with the topic at hand?




Korean Altai kardes.

Charles Bronson
09-15-2016, 07:26 AM
Advertisement promoting a Chinese made film about the Korean War depicts a bus of elderly Chinese tourists in Korea, bragging that they did not need a passport the first time they came to Seoul (as part of a war troop).

Unexpectedly, the ad causes outrage among many Chinese youth who now overwhelmingly side with South Korea over North Korea, and represents a huge disconnect between public sentiment and the government's continued ties with North Korea.

http://chinadigitaltimes.net/2016/09/ad-korean-war-film-offends-netizens/

This is the language you must be learn in the future.

http://www.theapricity.com/forum/showthread.php?2925-Post-your-accent-thread&p=3915657#post3915657

Selurong
09-15-2016, 07:44 AM
Korean Altai kardes.

But the Altaic language family is a long debunked one.

Altaic (/Šlˈteɪᵻk/) is a proposed language family of central Eurasia, now widely seen as discredited.[1][2][3][4] Various versions included the Turkic, Mongolic, Tungusic, Koreanic, and Japonic languages.[5] These languages are spoken in a wide arc stretching from northeast Asia through Central Asia to Anatolia and eastern Europe.[6] The group is named after the Altai Mountains, a mountain range in Central Asia.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Altaic_languages

Ingenious
09-15-2016, 07:48 AM
Advertisement promoting a Chinese made film about the Korean War depicts a bus of elderly Chinese tourists in Korea, bragging that they did not need a passport the first time they came to Seoul (as part of a war troop).

Unexpectedly, the ad causes outrage among many Chinese youth who now overwhelmingly side with South Korea over North Korea, and represents a huge disconnect between public sentiment and the government's continued ties with North Korea.

http://chinadigitaltimes.net/2016/09/ad-korean-war-film-offends-netizens/

How would China like it if Japanese made similar commercial in Nanking...saying they did not need passports last time they were there

zhaoyun
09-15-2016, 02:41 PM
This is the language you must be learn in the future.

http://www.theapricity.com/forum/showthread.php?2925-Post-your-accent-thread&p=3915657#post3915657

Quit joking. You're going to have to learn Mandarin in the future, and that's not even a joke.

zhaoyun
09-15-2016, 02:42 PM
How would China like it if Japanese made similar commercial in Nanking...saying they did not need passports last time they were there

Yeah, that's why I think the ad is fucking retarded. Although obviously the ad creator was thinking they were on North Korea's side, but whatever.