PDA

View Full Version : Defenders of Hindu Dharma (Ross and co.)



Mortimer
06-10-2017, 02:54 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=guJhbIhO6yQ

Fractal
06-10-2017, 02:55 AM
Thanks my fellow Indo-Aryan

Mortimer
06-10-2017, 02:57 AM
Thanks my fellow Indo-Aryan

Thanks Ross

Óttar
06-10-2017, 02:59 AM
Thanks Ross
I am generally sympathetic to the Hindu right, but they need to allow scholars to publish books in India without getting banned, and they also need to accept that Aryan-migration is real.

I'm out. Life's too short. Cheers, bros. :cheers:

Fractal
06-10-2017, 03:01 AM
I am generally sympathetic to the Hindu right, but they need to allow scholars to publish books in India without getting banned, and they also need to accept that Aryan-migration is real.

I'm out. Life's too short. Cheers, bros.

That's not what the current archaelogical, linguistic, GENETIC, and religious textual evidence shows.

Anyways @ Mortimer: My favorite symbols of Hinduism (the 2nd unfortunately being stole by non-Aryan Germans)

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/b7/Om_symbol.svg/2000px-Om_symbol.svg.png

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/63/HinduSwastika.svg/1003px-HinduSwastika.svg.png

Vyasa
06-10-2017, 03:01 AM
http://www.theapricity.com/forum/showthread.php?212170-MagnusAurelius

Óttar
06-10-2017, 03:06 AM
That's not what the current archaelogical, linguistic, GENETIC, and religious textual evidence shows.
WRONG. How do you explain that the Atharva Veda, the newest, is the first ever mention of lotus flowers and other geographical features that didn't exist in the extreme Northwest and that Hindus didn't even mention or encounter until they moved into the Ganges plane?

*Mike drop*

A plain truth is better than a beautiful lie.

SATYAMEVA JAYATE

I'm out.

Purohit ji
06-10-2017, 06:02 AM
Great alpha indians.

Colonel Frank Grimes
06-10-2017, 06:19 AM
Buddhism ruined Jack Kerouac as an author.

Fractal
06-26-2017, 03:42 AM
Buddhism ruined Jack Kerouac as an author.

Did Buddhism ruin Richard Gere?

Mingle
06-26-2017, 04:16 AM
I am generally sympathetic to the Hindu right, but they need to allow scholars to publish books in India without getting banned, and they also need to accept that Aryan-migration is real.

I'm out. Life's too short. Cheers, bros. :cheers:

How did you become Hindu?

Do you really believe in all the Hindu gods and goddesses or is it just a religion that you're very sympathetic to and hold in high moral value?

Colonel Frank Grimes
06-26-2017, 04:51 AM
Did Buddhism ruin Richard Gere?

Richard Gere's Buddhism didn't become central in his work as an actor. It did for Kerouac (at least in the superficial). Anyway, you're a foreigner. You're not familiar with American literature.

JohnSmith
06-26-2017, 04:56 AM
The Indians in those depictions are quite pale.

JohnSmith
06-26-2017, 04:58 AM
I like how George Harrison was influenced by Hindu culture. The Beatles were a great bad and Harrison was a good guitar player.

Mortimer
06-26-2017, 04:58 AM
The Indians in those depictions are quite pale.

they sometimes depict themselfes as blue too. artistical expression. stop talking shit that indians like white people or admire them.
http://www.crystalinks.com/shiva_blue.jpg

JohnSmith
06-26-2017, 05:00 AM
they sometimes depict themselfes as blue too. artistical expression. stop talking shit that indians like white people or admire them.
http://www.crystalinks.com/shiva_blue.jpg

I do not talk shit,,, you have a short fuse. They do look blue not sure what that is all about.

Mortimer
06-26-2017, 05:03 AM
I do not talk shit,,, you have a short fuse. They do look blue not sure what that is all about.

you said they depict themselfes as "pale" i understood it you play into the thing that indians want to be white like magnus and raine. they dont want to be white. blue is a irreal colour not real human colour. its artistic expression. also blue could stand for black, because sometimes very black people have a blueish tint.

JohnSmith
06-26-2017, 05:08 AM
you said they depict themselfes as "pale" i understood it you play into the thing that indians want to be white like magnus and raine. they dont want to be white. blue is a irreal colour not real human colour. its artistic expression. also blue could stand for black, because sometimes very black people have a blueish tint.
umm no ,, I do not think that they want to be white. They do use whiting bleaches but so do Koreans it is a cultural thing, like how westerners go tanning. I do not have to explain myself to you. I have telling you for a while you need to see a psychologist.

Óttar
06-26-2017, 06:14 AM
How did you become Hindu?
One must assimilate into Hinduism over time. There is an example of a Hindu king inviting some of the Yavanas (Greeks) to join the Hindu fold through performing certain Vedic rituals. Heliodoros, an ambassador of the Yavanas, was a member of a Vaishnava sect. One enters a Hindu tradition through diksha, initiation by a guru. In my own case, the proper guru has not manifested himself/herself yet. If we think of traditional, polytheistic religion (esp. Indo-European) as existing along a continuum, Hinduism is the one form of this type of religion which has maintained itself against the militant spread of Abrahamic religions. Unfortunately, I can no longer go to Greece and Rome and see the seasonal festivals, temples, and sacrifices.


Do you really believe in all the Hindu gods and goddesses or is it just a religion that you're very sympathetic to and hold in high moral value?
In traditional polytheistic religions, *belief* in the gods per se is secondary. It is not the same as in the Abrahamic religions. The gods are an integral part of one's culture. According to the Indian Supreme Court, a Hindu is one who accepts the authority of the Vedas and the Upanishads. Historically, schools of thought were divided into Astika (those who accept Vedic authority) and Nastika (those who reject Vedic authority e.g. Buddhists and others). Some of the schools (Darshanas, "viewpoints") accepted the authority of the Vedas, and yet rejected the idea of a personal god despite the actual text (Samhitas) of the Vedas being filled with references to gods. Why was this so? Because the acceptance of Vedic authority was in many ways a way of affirming one's cultural and spiritual allegiance.

From a devotional perspective, I am a Shakta. From an intellectual perspective, I am influenced by Advaita Vedanta (non-dualism). Through experience, I am what one of my friends would call a "methodological atheist." In Sanskrit, this is known as Carvaka, or Lokayata ("Worldly" i.e. One who accepts this world as one's only possible frame of reference). This may seem like a contradiction, but such a thing is permitted within the larger framework of 'Hinduism' as it does not function the way that Abrahamic religions do. In Indian (Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain) discourse, there exists a position called "multiplicity of views" (Anekantavada) and it is believed that sensory perceptions may appear vastly different depending on one's state of consciousness.

Fractal
06-26-2017, 06:24 AM
Richard Gere's Buddhism didn't become central in his work as an actor. It did for Kerouac (at least in the superficial). Anyway, you're a foreigner. You're not familiar with American literature.

Stephen King is considered American literature, as is Tom Clancy.

Fractal
06-26-2017, 06:25 AM
umm no ,, I do not think that they want to be white. They do use whiting bleaches but so do Koreans it is a cultural thing, like how westerners go tanning. I do not have to explain myself to you. I have telling you for a while you need to see a psychologist.

Indians don't want to be White my friend. Please stop with your delusions too.

JohnSmith
06-26-2017, 06:30 AM
Indians don't want to be White my friend. Please stop with your delusions too.

Don't act a fool.:D

Fractal
06-26-2017, 06:34 AM
Don't act a fool.:D

:rotfl:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LkjsPuCl0p4

JohnSmith
06-26-2017, 06:37 AM
:rotfl:

[vide

Typical Stereotypes,, but I do not like country music.

Fractal
06-26-2017, 06:39 AM
Typical Stereotypes,, but I do not like country music.

Of course, there is one for Asians too. :rofl_002:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rpNkfaMCFqE

Colonel Frank Grimes
06-26-2017, 06:45 AM
Stephen King is considered American literature, as is Tom Clancy.

litˇerˇaˇture
ˈlidərəCHər,ˈlidərəˌCHo͝or/Submit
noun
written works, especially those considered of superior or lasting artistic merit.
"a great work of literature"
synonyms: written works, writings, writing, creative writing, literary texts, compositions; informallit
"English literature"

King and Clancy books falls under 'dime store novels.'

Mingle
06-26-2017, 07:06 AM
One must assimilate into Hinduism over time. There is an example of a Hindu king inviting some of the Yavanas (Greeks) to join the Hindu fold through performing certain Vedic rituals. Heliodoros, an ambassador of the Yavanas, was a member of a Vaishnava sect. One enters a Hindu tradition through diksha, initiation by a guru. In my own case, the proper guru has not manifested himself/herself yet. If we think of traditional, polytheistic religion (esp. Indo-European) as existing along a continuum, Hinduism is the one form of this type of religion which has maintained itself against the militant spread of Abrahamic religions. Unfortunately, I can no longer go to Greece and Rome and see the seasonal festivals, temples, and sacrifices.


In traditional polytheistic religions, *belief* in the gods per se is secondary. It is not the same as in the Abrahamic religions. The gods are an integral part of one's culture. According to the Indian Supreme Court, a Hindu is one who accepts the authority of the Vedas and the Upanishads. Historically, schools of thought were divided into Astika (those who accept Vedic authority) and Nastika (those who reject Vedic authority e.g. Buddhists and others). Some of the schools (Darshanas, "viewpoints") accepted the authority of the Vedas, and yet rejected the idea of a personal god despite the actual text (Samhitas) of the Vedas being filled with references to gods. Why was this so? Because the acceptance of Vedic authority was in many ways a way of affirming one's cultural and spiritual allegiance.

From a devotional perspective, I am a Shakta. From an intellectual perspective, I am influenced by Advaita Vedanta (non-dualism). Through experience, I am what one of my friends would call a "methodological atheist." In Sanskrit, this is known as Carvaka, or Lokayata ("Worldly" i.e. One who accepts this world as one's only possible frame of reference). This may seem like a contradiction, but such a thing is permitted within the larger framework of 'Hinduism' as it does not function the way that Abrahamic religions do. In Indian (Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain) discourse, there exists a position called "multiplicity of views" (Anekantavada) and it is believed that sensory perceptions may appear vastly different depending on one's state of consciousness.

Since you're a Shakta, I assume this means you accept the Vedas. What caused you to accept the Vedas? How come you didn't become a Buddhist?

wvwvw
06-27-2017, 02:45 AM
How did you become Hindu?

Do you really believe in all the Hindu gods and goddesses or is it just a religion that you're very sympathetic to and hold in high moral value?

His decision to become a Hindu was a missed steak

Kamal900
06-27-2017, 03:05 AM
Purohit ji:
https://i.imgflip.com/1rkfrk.jpg

Ross:
https://i.imgflip.com/1rkfz5.jpg

Óttar
06-27-2017, 03:21 AM
Since you're a Shakta, I assume this means you accept the Vedas. What caused you to accept the Vedas? How come you didn't become a Buddhist?
I accept the Vedas, yes. I accept the Vedas in the same way as any follower of an Astika Darshana accepts the Vedas. It is a requirement. The Upanishads, while they are distinct from the text (Samhitas) of the Vedas proper, are considered a part of the greater Vedic corpus. Think of the Vedic corpus like the U.S. Constitution; the text of the U.S. Constitution per se is small, but in a legal sense, the U.S. Constitution includes the ever-expanding body of case law unto itself. The Upanishads form the philosophical basis of Advaita Vedanta (non-dualism). As an Advaita Vedantin, I accept the existence of a Self (atman) identical with the Absolute (Brahman). Buddhism does not accept the existence of a Self.

Fractal
10-12-2017, 07:00 PM
You forgot Butlerking - one of the original defenders of the Aryan race on TA.

Jehan
10-14-2017, 01:47 PM
Indians don't want to be White my friend. Please stop with your delusions too.

So why your indian friens buttlerking put europeans as his ethnicity? Why do you use to came here under germanic identity when you use sockpuppets?

Fractal
10-14-2017, 04:40 PM
So why your indian friens buttlerking put europeans as his ethnicity? Why do you use to came here under germanic identity when you use sockpuppets?


I didn't register with the intention of being a regular only registered because I wanted to troll some user in Butlerkin's threads, but then was gradually sucked into the forum because there was a forum crash around the same time I signed up (August 2016), and the only forum feature which was functional was the chatbox. That's where I began conversing with UG, El barbaro, foreigner, Dema, and many others.