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Loki
10-20-2017, 07:00 PM
I am currently looking into the Book of Enoch (actually Books of Enoch), and find it fascinating. It is said to have been written originally by Enoch, one of the early patriarchs before the time of Noah's Flood. The books recount interesting stories about the early days, with fallen angels called the Nephilim, giants, and many other fascinating things. Also, often things are talked about in the other books of the Bible, and it turns out the info came from the Book of Enoch. It is even quoted in another book of the Bible. Many things about the Bible seem to make more sense with this added information.. almost like a missing piece of the puzzle. Also these days many people are discussing it on YouTube, as it has eschatological importance. I personally find its accounts of the antediluvian world fascinating. But I need to acquire the full book for myself first to study it properly.

It is also said that the book gives insight into early Christian thinking, as the early Christians used it a lot, and also Jewish thinking at the time, and the development of Talmudic Judaism. But the Jews didn't like the Book of Enoch at all, for a few reasons.

Here is a short review of the book:

“The Book of Enoch” is not part of the biblical canon as used by Jews, apart from Beta Israel. Most Christian denominations and traditions may accept the Books of Enoch as having some historical or theological interest, but they generally regard the Books of Enoch as non-canonical or non-inspired. It is regarded as canonical by the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church and Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Church, but not by any other Christian groups. It is wholly extant only in the Ge'ez language, with Aramaic fragments from the Dead Sea Scrolls and a few Greek and Latin fragments. For this and other reasons, the traditional Ethiopian belief is that the original language of the work was Ge'ez, whereas non-Ethiopian scholars tend to assert that it was first written in either Aramaic or Hebrew; Ephraim Isaac suggests that the Book of Enoch, like the Book of Daniel, was composed partially in Aramaic and partially in Hebrew. No Hebrew version is known to have survived. It is asserted in the book itself that its author was Enoch, before the Biblical Flood. Although evidently widely known during the development of the Hebrew Bible canon, 1 Enoch was excluded from both the formal canon of the Tanakh and the typical canon of the Septuagint and therefore, also from the writings known today as the Deuterocanon. One possible reason for Jewish rejection of the book might be the textual nature of several early sections of the book that make use of material from the Torah; for example, 1 En 1 is a midrash of Deuteronomy 33. The content, particularly detailed descriptions of fallen angels, would also be a reason for rejection from the Hebrew canon at this period – as illustrated by the comments of Trypho the Jew when debating with Justin Martyr on this subject: "The utterances of God are holy, but your expositions are mere contrivances, as is plain from what has been explained by you; nay, even blasphemies, for you assert that angels sinned and revolted from God." (Dialogue 79) The Book of Enoch was considered as scripture in the Epistle of Barnabas (16:4) and by many of the early Church Fathers, such as Athenagoras, Clement of Alexandria, Irenaeus and Tertullian, who wrote c. 200 that the Book of Enoch had been rejected by the Jews because it contained prophecies pertaining to Christ. However, later Fathers denied the canonicity of the book, and some even considered the Epistle of Jude uncanonical because it refers to an "apocryphal" work.

Loki
10-20-2017, 07:17 PM
Another book excluded from the Biblical canon is the Book of Jubilees, which was also well-known and popular with the early church. Interestingly enough, it seems that Islam drew a lot of inspiration from the Book of Jubilees... so much so that one can say Islam is closer to early Christianity than to modern Christianity.

StonyArabia
10-20-2017, 07:33 PM
Another book excluded from the Biblical canon is the Book of Jubilees, which was also well-known and popular with the early church. Interestingly enough, it seems that Islam drew a lot of inspiration from the Book of Jubilees... so much so that one can say Islam is closer to early Christianity than to modern Christianity.

Islam is very much close to the early Jewish-Christian sects like the Ebionites and other sects. Some of these Jewish-Christian sects made it to Arabia, but by the 11th century most converted to Islam or were absorbed by north Arabian Jewish communities. Modern Christianity descents from Paul and it largely got Hellenized and then Europeanized by the Roman authorities. What is also interesting that the early Christians in Europe believed that Islam might have been a Christian heresy.

The book of Enoch is recognized in the Ethiopian Church. Interestingly the Ethiopians invade Arabia, in hopes of converting them to Christianity, but this proved to be a very difficult task as most Arabians stayed loyal to their pagan religion, and Judaism was more conducive for conversion among Arabian tribes. The Ethiopian invasion is also believed to what would eventually lay the seeds of Islam in the region, at least by secular historians, but this is remembered by Arabs and Muslims as a brutal invasion.

Of course Ethiopian raids never ceased and once they invade Yemen, and destroy the Marib Damn, it would send Arabian tribes into the Fertile Crescent such as the Ghassanids and Lakhmids, ironically both resisted Christianity, but adopted it nominally.

There was also a syncretic Christian sect in Arabia, that combined Christianity with Goddess Worship, where Mary is Al-lat the mother Goddess and creator, and Jesus is her son, and the Father takes a secondary role. The sect is believed to have originated possibly in Southern Syria, and by the infamous Queen Mavia. Although this sect was also quite common, many associated with the Arabian pagans, unlike the Ebionites who did not, and regarded themselves as Jewish followers of Jesus, but Jesus as a prophet of God.

Loki
11-01-2017, 10:09 AM
Must-see. I see it has over 5 million views, but this is only the beginning. The news is spreading.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zQqkUUWuCyA

Ujku
11-01-2017, 10:18 AM
All these fallen angels stories sound like Aliens to me. Observers , mating with human girls etc..

Loki
11-01-2017, 10:35 AM
All these fallen angels stories sound like Aliens to me. Observers , mating with human girls etc..

Yes, indeed! :) This explains aliens.. and it's real. And, as in the days of Enoch, they are again tampering with the human species... producing hybrids. Check this:


https://youtu.be/HpPmPYWN8aw

Hexachordia
11-02-2017, 07:02 AM
Niphilims belong to foundamentally the Babylonian tradition, hebrews inherited the legend from Babylon, so the Book maybe a Babylonian tastament to the prehistoric and a prophecy that had predicted the coming of Christ. It is also very interesting that I find a lot of resonance of oppressed eastern ideology to that of Alister Crowley`s philosophy, and also to the Babylonian system of zodiac signs. Zodiacs maybe a heritage of the niphilims as well.

God wiped out niphilims on Earth, and the rest may have escaped into space, they are not angels but half angels we must not mistake.