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Smaug
05-23-2018, 08:23 PM
Immigration to Brazil


https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/0/05/Flag_of_Brazil.svg/30px-Flag_of_Brazil.svg.pnghttps://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/0/03/Flag_of_Italy.svg/31px-Flag_of_Italy.svg.pnghttps://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/5c/Flag_of_Portugal.svg/31px-Flag_of_Portugal.svg.pnghttps://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/9/9a/Flag_of_Spain.svg/31px-Flag_of_Spain.svg.pnghttps://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/b/ba/Flag_of_Germany.svg/35px-Flag_of_Germany.svg.pnghttps://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/a/ae/Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom.svg/40px-Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom.svg.pnghttps://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/1/12/Flag_of_Poland.svg/34px-Flag_of_Poland.svg.pnghttps://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/11/Flag_of_Lithuania.svg/33px-Flag_of_Lithuania.svg.pnghttps://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/59/Flag_of_Lebanon.svg/30px-Flag_of_Lebanon.svg.pnghttps://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d4/Flag_of_Israel.svg/30px-Flag_of_Israel.svg.pnghttps://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/9/9e/Flag_of_Japan.svg/31px-Flag_of_Japan.svg.pnghttps://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/48/Flag_of_Bolivia.svg/29px-Flag_of_Bolivia.svg.png

In this thread I will talk a little about the immigration waves that Brazil received in the late 19th century and early 20th century. Throughout its history, Brazil has always been a recipient of immigrants, but this began to gain importance in the late 19th century and throughout the 20th century when the country received massive immigration from Europe, the Middle East and East Asia, which left lasting marks on demography, culture, language and the economy of Brazil.

In general, it is considered that people who entered Brazil up to 1822, the year of independence, were colonizers. Since then, those who entered the independent nation were immigrants. Before 1871, the number of immigrants rarely exceeded two or three thousand people a year. Immigration increased pressure mostly from the end of the international slave trade to Brazil and after the expansion of the economy, especially in the period of large coffee plantations in the state of São Paulo, which contributed to increase the number of immigrants that arrived in the country per year.

Immigration has been a very important demographic factor in the composition, structure and history of human population in Brazil, with all its attending factors and consequences in culture, economy, education, racial issues, etc.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8d/Europeans_and_Arabs_in_Brazil.jpg
European and Levantine countries ranked accordingly to their immigrant contribution

The countries in the Americas that received a major European immigrants wave from 1871 to 1940, were: the United States (27 million), Argentina (6.5 million), Brazil (6.0 million) and Canada (4 million). There was also a sizable Asian immigration to Brazil, mainly from Japan, but also from Korea, China and Middle East. Asian immigration also had a great impact on Brazilian culture, making of this country with more Japanese after Japan and with one of the biggest Arabic communities in the New World.

http://www.familiasdobrasil.com.br/raiozbox/manager/img/cache/eS5cMwhShhTOpM0rMJbctgP29YcqD5sgKbCZLOYLt53LX2KCZg _thumb_fotoitalianos.jpghttp://3.bp.blogspot.com/-IAnC1J_CMhQ/Tbr3_ji8gmI/AAAAAAAAAAQ/tz-PysVBTB0/s1600/cartaz1925.jpghttp://4.bp.blogspot.com/_bmAyINP38RQ/S9OIv2NrQSI/AAAAAAAABF0/qZ3U5gSgmls/s1600/Cartaz-antigo.jpg
Immigration propaganda in Japanese and Italian

Smaug
05-23-2018, 08:23 PM
Italian Immigration

Today

According to the Italian government, there are 25 million Brazilians of Italian descent, the largest population of Italian background outside of Italy itself. Many Brazilian politicians, artists, footballers, models and personalities are or were of Italian descent. Amongst Italian-Brazilian one finds several State Governors, Congressmen, mayors and ambassadors. Three Presidents of Brazil were of Italian descent: Pascoal Ranieri Mazzilli, Itamar Franco and Emílio Garrastazu Médici.

Areas of Settlement
http://commondatastorage.googleapis.com/static.panoramio.com/photos/original/30978320.jpg
http://i53.tinypic.com/34s5n68.jpg
Serra Negra in the state of São Paulo (first) and Nova Veneza in the state of Santa Catarina (second) are two cities famous for its Italian influence

Among all Italians who immigrated to Brazil, 70% went to the State of São Paulo. In consequence, São Paulo has more people with Italian ancestry than any region of Italy itself. The rest went mostly to the states of Rio Grande do Sul, Santa Cataria, Rio de Janeiro and Minas Gerais.

Due to the internal migration, many Italians, second and third generations descendants, moved to other areas. In the early 20th century, many rural Italian workers from Rio Grande do Sul migrated to the west of Santa Catarina and then further north to Paraná.

More recently, third and fourth generations have been migrating to other areas; thus it is possible to find people of Italian descent in Brazilian regions where the immigrants had never settled, such as in the Cerrado region of Central-West, in the Northeast and in the Amazon rainforest area, in the extreme North of Brazil.

Places of Origin

https://i.pinimg.com/originals/a6/77/a3/a677a359696f55f31b20304874c78f35.jpg
Italian Regions

Over half of the Italian immigrants came from Northern Italian regions of Veneto, Lombardy, Tuscany and Emilia-Romagna. About 30% emigrated from Veneto. On the other hand, during the 20th century, Central and Southern Italians predominated in Brazil, coming from the regions of Campania, Abruzzo, Molise, Basilicata and Sicily.

Regions of Origin of Italian Immigrants:

Vêneto 365.710
Campânia 166.080
Calábria 113.155
Lombardia 105.973
Abruzzo-Molise 93.020
Toscana 81.056
Emília-Romagna 59.877
Basilicata 52.888
Sicília 44.390
Piemonte 40.336
Puglia 34.833
Marche 25.074
Lácio 15.982
Úmbria 11.818
Ligúria 9.328
Sardenha 6.113

Total : 1.243.633

History

Situation in Italy:

During the last quarter of the 19th century, the newly united Italy suffered an economic crisis. In the Northern regions, there was unemployment due to the introduction of new techniques in agriculture, while Southern Italy remained underdeveloped and untouched by modernization in agrarian structure. Even in the North, industrialization was still in its initial stages, and illiteracy was still common in Italy (though more in the south and islands than in the north). Thus, poverty and lack of jobs and income stimulated Northern (and also Southern) Italians to emigrate. Most Italian immigrants were very poor rural workers (braccianti).

Situation in Brazil:

In 1850, under British pressure, Brazil finally passed a law that effectively banned transatlantic slave trade. The increased pressure of the abolitionist movement, on the other hand, made clear that the days of slavery in Brazil were coming to an end. Slave trade was in fact effectively suppressed, but the slave system still endured for almost four decades. So the discussion about European immigration to Brazil became a priority for Brazilian landowners. The latter claimed that such migrants were or would soon become indispensable for Brazilian agriculture. They would soon win the argument and mass migration would begin in earnest.

Immigration and Settlement:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/fc/Italians_Sao_Paulo.jpg/640px-Italians_Sao_Paulo.jpg

Italian immigrants in São Paulo

The Brazilian government (with or following the Emperor's support) had created the first colonies of immigrants (colônias de imigrantes) in the early 19th century. These colonies were established in rural areas of the country, being settled by European families, mainly German immigrants that settled in many areas of Southern Brazil.
The first groups of Italians arrived in 1875, but the boom of Italian immigration in Brazil happened in late 19th century, between 1880 and 1900, when almost one million Italians arrived and headed mostly to São Paulo and Rio Grande do Sul.

A great number of Italians was naturalized Brazilian at the end of the 19th century, when the 'Great Naturalization' conceded automatically citizenship to all the immigrants residing in Brazil prior to November 15, 1889 "unless they declared a desire to keep their original nationality within six months."

During the last years of the 19th century, the denouncements of bad conditions in Brazil increased in the press.
Reacting to the public clamor and many proved cases of mistreatments of Italian immigrants, the government of Italy issued, in 1902, the Prinetti decree forbidding subsidized immigration to Brazil. In consequence, the number of Italian immigrants in Brazil fell drastically in the beginning of the 20th century, but the wave of Italian immigration continued until 1920.

Celebrity Examples:

Bianca Franceschinelli:
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Ko13TbbQuw4/T-t1rxU_u1I/AAAAAAAAA0w/mvGEZMwgaH4/s1600/bianca-bin-atriz.jpg

Rubens Barrichello:
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-jeMDYz6YyNc/TdqzC0w3dHI/AAAAAAAAAIo/XFMNdVRjK0M/s1600/barrichello2.jpg

Isabella Fiorentino:
https://abrilboaforma.files.wordpress.com/2016/10/isabella-fiorentino.jpg

Emmerson Fittipaldi:
https://cdn.foxsports.com.br/sites/foxsports-br/files/img/notes/materia/Emerson-Fittipaldi-fala-480-getty.jpg

Luana Piovani:
http://www.clickgratis.com.br/_upload/images/2012/07/02/luana-piovani-63.jpg

Carmo Dalla Vecchia:
https://www.terra.com.br/saude/infograficos/dieta-carmo-dalla-vecchia/img/dieta7.jpg

Smaug
05-23-2018, 08:24 PM
German Immigration

Today

German Brazilians are now about 12 million people, who live in the entire country, although the overwhelming percentage is found in the country's South Region, mainly in the states of Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina, with lesser but still significant degree in the Southeast Region in areas like São Paulo, Espirito Santo and Rio de Janeiro. German dialects together make up the second most spoken first language in Brazil. A few Brazilian municipalities have Brazilian Hunsrückisch and Germanic Pomeranian as co-official with Portuguese.

http://i562.photobucket.com/albums/ss62/fabius_barros/DSC04977.jpg
http://i182.photobucket.com/albums/x289/rodrigomarques88/17-6.jpg
Campos do Jordão in the state of São Paulo (first) and Gramado in the state of Rio Grande do Sul (second) are just two examples of many cities in Brazil with German influences.

The German Brazilian areas form, today, a Brazilian region with its own character, made up of towns and large concentrations of residents around the church, commerce and school. These rural villages are connected to major cities where the economy was diversified, adding cottage industries to the original agricultural production.

Areas of Settlement

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/7c/Kolonien_Suedbrasilien.png/434px-Kolonien_Suedbrasilien.png
German colonies in South Brazil

Most of German-Brazilian population lives in the states of Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina, with minor communities in Espirito Santo, São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro.

Regions of Origin

Most of German-Brazilians descend from immigrants that came from the Western and Northern Germany, mainly from Rhineland, Hunsrück and Westphalia, but there’s also a sizable contribution from many other regions of Germany, mainly Pomerania, Saxony, Baden-Württemberg and even from Prussia, with also a Volga German contribution.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/5e/Portal_de_Pomerode.jpg/1200px-Portal_de_Pomerode.jpg
Pomerode in the state of Santa Catarina is the most German city in Brazil, where Pomeranian German is more spoken than Portuguese itself

History

Many Germans left the German states after the failed revolutions of 1848. Between 1878 and 1892, another 7 million Germans left Germany; after the 1870s Germany was one of the countries from which the largest numbers of people emigrated, the vast majority to the United States.

Germans appeared in fourth place among immigrants to Brazil, but dropped to fifth place when Japanese immigration increased after 1908. It had a notable impact on the ethnic composition of the country, particularly of the Southern Brazilian population. Different factors led to this large influence.

German immigration to Brazil is an old phenomenon which started as early as 1824, many decades before the beginning of the immigration of other European ethnic groups to Brazil. For example, the first significant groups of Italians to immigrate to Brazil only arrived in 1875, many decades after the arrival of the first Germans. When the settlement of other Europeans in Brazil began, the Germans had already been living there for many generations. Another factor was the high birth rates among German Brazilians

When German-speaking immigrants first arrived in Brazil starting at the beginning of the 19th century, they did not identify themselves so much as a unified German-Brazilian group. However, as time went on this common regional identity did emerge for many different geo-socio-political reasons.

Germans immigrated mainly from what is now Germany, but also from other countries where German communities were established. From 1824 to 1969, around 250,000 Germans emigrated to Brazil, being the fourth largest immigrant community to settle in the country, after the Portuguese, Italians and Spaniards. About 30% of them arrived between World War I and World War II.

Only a minority of German Brazilians were Germanists. Most German Brazilians did not consider it important to be connected to Germany through associations or political parties. Despite attempts by Germanists to attract the population of German origin in churches or schools, few of them followed these ideas. This was evident in the failure of the Nazi Party when trying to attract a following among German Brazilians. During the World War II many Germans and their descendants (as well as Italians and Japanese) were persecuted in Brazil.

http://melanges.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/MaturidadeCaminhada2.jpg
Oktoberfest in Santa Cruz do Sul

Celebrity Examples

Rodrigo Hilbert:
http://i0.statig.com.br/fw/5g/pt/7q/5gpt7qnbwtl46irowbgjcqlsm.jpg

Giselle Bündchen:
https://media.self.com/photos/582cbf459757aade7c08da34/4:3/w_728,c_limit/gisele-water.jpg

Mano Menezes (Luiz Venker):
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-k-1Vi7Oz2F4/UK-9-8XVFKI/AAAAAAABw7s/RvFJ95c3af8/s1600/Mano-no-jogo.jpg

Anna Hickmann:
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-yVneVweHleQ/TuCpzxslqgI/AAAAAAAAXfI/QVCJIgEM5EE/s1600/ana-hickmann.jpg

Carolina Dieckmann:
http://www.marcosproenca.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/MProenca-CarolinaDieckman-BLOG-3.jpg

Odilon Wagner
https://cdn.ome.lt/extras/capas/mSvadtL8B6inrg6lSIkiZV0dL4t_3.jpg
  

Smaug
05-23-2018, 08:24 PM
Portuguese Immigration

Today

About 5 million people in Brazil have recent Portuguese ancestry, and other dozen of million have Portuguese ancestry dating back to colonial times. Brazil was colonized by Portugal, and both countries share Portuguese, Roman Catholicism, and many traditions.

The more recent immigrant groups of Portuguese in Brazil keep a close relation with Portugal and the Portuguese culture mainly through the Casa de Portugal. Several events also take place to maintain cultural interchange between Portuguese and Brazilian students, and between the Portugal and the Portuguese community in Brazil. There are many Portuguese associations (Associações Portuguesas) in Brazil like the Beneficência Portuguesa and many other institutions preserve the cultural heritage of the Portuguese community like the Real Gabinete and the Liceu Literário Português.

Areas of Settlement

http://meuroteirordc.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/GRANDE01-DestaqueOuroPreto.jpg
Ourto Preto, state of Minas Gerais, 18th century Portuguese colonial style.

Since Brazil was a Portuguese colony, Portuguese settled in all the Brazilian regions. However, if we consider only the recent immigration from the 19th and 20th centuries, they main regions these immigrants settled were in the states of Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo and Rio Grande do Sul.

Azoreans predominate in Rio Grande do Sul and continental Portuguese, mainly Nothern and Central, predominate in São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro.

Regions of Origins

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b6/Imigrantes_portugueses.jpg
Portuguese Immigrants, early 20th century

Immigration from Nothern and Central Portuguese regions was predominat, both in the colonial times and in the post-Industrial Revolution period:

Portuguese emigration at the end of the 19th century to Brazil

Region - Percentage
Beira Litoral - 25%
Beira Alta - 22,6%
Douro Litoral - 17%
Trás-os-Montes - 14,5%
Minho - 13%
Estremadura - 6,3%
Baixo Tejo - 0,6%
Beira Baixa - 0,5%
Ribatejo - 0,5%
Algarve - 0,4%
Alto Alentejo - 0,1%

History

http://nossaciencia.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/mapa_capitanias_hereditarias_guia_do_estudante_bra sil_colonia.jpg
Colonial Brazil map.

By the mid-16th century, Portuguese colonists were already settling in significant numbers, mainly along the coastal regions of Brazil. Numerous cities were established, including Salvador (1549), São Paulo (1554) and Rio de Janeiro (1565). While most Portuguese (and predominantly male) settlers came willingly, some were forced exiles or degredados. Such convicts were sentenced for a variety of crimes according to the [I]Ordenações do Reino, which included common theft, attempted murder and adultery.

Many decades later, a few years after independence from Portugal in 1822, Portuguese people would start arriving in Brazil as immigrants and not as colonists. The Portuguese population in Brazil actually increased. Most of them were peasants from the rural areas of Portugal. The majority settled in urban centres, mainly in São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, working mainly as small traders or shopkeepers.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_hKKn6qgVi94/S-8MvpHMFhI/AAAAAAAAAuk/w1E0FMtAVyg/s1600/Bonde+Rua+do+Comercio.jpg
[I]The port-city of Santos, state of São Paulo, was the city where most of immigrants passed through when they came to Brazil in the 20th century

More Recently, In the first six months of 2011, with the economic crisis in Portugal and several other European Union member states, including Spain, Italy, Ireland and Greece, a record number of 328,826 Portuguese citizens made their situation regular in Brazil. One of the reasons which explained this rise in Portuguese immigration to Brazil was the economic crisis in Portugal, where unemployment rate rose to over 12,5%. In that period, the Portuguese lead the numbers of foreigners making their situation regular in Brazil.

Celebrity Examples

Maitê Proença:
http://entretenimento.r7.com/blogs/fabiola-reipert/files/2010/12/mait%C3%AA.jpg

Gabriel Braga Nunes:
http://contamais.com.br/upload/imagens_upload/Gabriel_Braga_Nunes.jpg

Tancredo Neves:
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/64/Tancredo_Neves%2C_1983.jpg

Fernanda Montenegro:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/ef/Fernandamontenegro28122006.JPG/441px-Fernandamontenegro28122006.JPG

Smaug
05-23-2018, 08:25 PM
Spanish Immigration

Today

Spanish immigration was the third largest among immigrant groups in Brazil; about 750,000 immigrants entered Brazil from Spanish ports. Numbers of Spaniards coming to Brazil before independence are unknown. There are about 15 million Spanish-Brazilians nowadays, concentrated in São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro.

Areas of Settlement.

http://i1175.photobucket.com/albums/r636/lucas_sky/Rio%20Preto/DSC00352_800x600_zps5156ce46.jpg
http://static.panoramio.com/photos/original/1094198.jpg
São José do Rio preto (first) and Catanduva (second), both in the state of São Paulo, are famous for their sizeable Spanish community.

The main area of destination for Spaniards was the state of São Paulo, although the percentages of attraction to this state vary between 66% and 78% in different sources. The second largest contingent was deployed in Rio de Janeiro, while other states such as Minas Gerais, Rio Grande do Sul, Paraná, Mato Grosso, Pará and Bahia received smaller groups. Most Spaniards in Brazil came from the Galicia and Andalusia regions of Spain. Galician smallholders settled mainly in urban areas of Brazil. Starting in the early 20th century, most Spanish immigrants were Andalusian peasants who worked in the coffee plantations, mainly in rural areas of São Paulo State.

Regions of Origins

http://mw2.google.com/mw-panoramio/photos/medium/4252319.jpg
Nova Granada, state of São Paulo. Named after the Spanish city of Granada.

In all Brazilian states, the immigrants from Galicia predominated, and those were predominantly males, who emigrated alone, settled in urban centers and paid for their passage by ship. The only exception was the state of São Paulo, destination for the vast majority of the Spaniards, about 75% of the total. In São Paulo, 60% were from Andaluzia, and only 20% from Galicia. Those had their passage by ship paid by the Brazilian government, emigrated in families and were taken to the coffee farms to replace the African slave manpower.

History

Spanish emigration peaked in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and it was concentrated to Argentina and Cuba. Between 1882 and 1930, 3,297,312 Spaniards emigrated, of whom 1,594,622 went to Argentina and 1,118,960 went to Cuba. Brazil only started to be an important destination for immigrants from Spain in the 1880s, and the country received the third largest number of immigrants from that country, after Argentina and Cuba. Spaniards also made up the third largest national group to immigrate to Brazil, after the Italians and Portuguese.

Between 1840 and 1849, only 10 Spaniards immigrated to Brazil, 181 between 1850 and 1859, 633 between 1860 and 1869 and 3,940 between 1870 and 1879. The arrivals suddenly grew between 1880 and 1889, when 29,166 Spaniards arrived. Spanish immigration to Brazil was a direct result of the efforts of the Brazilian government to attract European workers to the country, in order to “whiten” the Brazilian population and to replace the African manpower.

The Brazilian government spent large amounts of money paying passages of European immigrants by ship (subsidized immigration). A huge propaganda was conducted by the Brazilian government in Spain, with agents that worked for it (ganchos) who went to the country in order to persuade Spaniards to immigrate to Brazil. The Brazilian government offered the free travel by ship to Brazil, and that was decisive in attracting immigrants.

Brazil was a country far less attractive than Argentina and Cuba, countries with which the Spaniards maintained cultural relations. Moreover, the working conditions in Brazil were much worse. Thus, the Spaniards who emigrated to Brazil were those who could not afford to pay a passage by ship to Cuba and Argentina, the poorest ones, and took advantage of the offer of free travel to Brazil. For the wretched Spanish peasants, the free passage by ship offered by the Brazilian government seemed a great opportunity to leave poverty.

http://www.institutophd.com.br/site/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/regiao-ribeirao-preto.jpg
The region of Ribeirão Preto in NW São Paulo was the place where most of Spanish settled.

It is estimated that since Brazil's independence (1822) some 750,000 Spaniards have entered Brazil. This figure represents between 12.5% and 14% of all foreigners entering Brazil since its independence and puts the Spaniards in the third place among immigrants in Brazil, behind the Portuguese and Italians.

Immigrants of Spanish origin were among those who had a higher rate of permanent residence in Brazil, overtaken by the Japanese but above nationalities such as Portuguese, Italian or German. This may be due to the large number of families traveling with passage paid by the Brazilian government that left their native Spain to work on coffee plantations of the state of São Paulo. Most Spaniards entered Brazil between 1880 and 1930, with the peak period between 1905 and 1919, when they overcome the entry of Italians.

Celebrity Examples

Luciana Gimenez:
http://i0.statig.com.br/fw/e0/s0/hv/e0s0hv7g7m11ubecbg4lpa5wy.jpg

Millôr Fernandes:
https://cdn.pensador.com/img/authors/mi/ll/millor-fernandes-l.jpg

Raul Cortez:
http://www.alemdaimaginacao.com/Obituario%20da%20Fama/Raul%20Cortez/raul_cortez2.jpg

Nélida Piñón:
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-OBxbI002A1Q/UCUJsK41CMI/AAAAAAAABog/MVEfjSMadlQ/s1600/n%C3%A9lida+pi%C3%B1on.jpg

Smaug
05-23-2018, 08:25 PM
Polish Immigration

Today

The number of Polish descendants in Brazil is estimated at 1.8 million. The State of Paraná still remains a strong influence from the Polish culture. Many small towns have a majority of Polish-descendants and the Polish language is spoken by some of them, although nowadays most Polish Brazilians only speak Portuguese. The city of Curitiba has the second largest Polish diaspora in the world (after Chicago) and Polish music, dishes and culture are quite common in the region.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f3/Curitiba_-_Bosque_do_Papa_-_Galp%C3%A3o_de_Colono_Polones.jpg
http://correio.rac.com.br/_midias/jpg/2016/03/28/curitiba-6657779.jpg
First: House in old-Polish style, Curitiba, state of Paraná. Second: Curitiba, capital of the state of Paraná

Areas of Settlement.

After the proclamation of the Republic, the Brazilian government practically opened the doors of the country to immigration. In the first years of the Republic, the greatest immigration to Brazil occurred. The Polish appeared in the statistics in significant numbers. This period was known in Poland as "Brazilian fever". Important Polish communities appeared in several Brazilian states:

-Paraná: Eufrosina, Rio Claro, São Mateus, Santa Bárbara, Prudentópolis, Ivaí, Apucarana (now Cândido de Abreu), Castro, Piraí do Sul, Palmeira, Cruz Machado, Guarapuava, Irati, Curitiba and others.
-Santa Catarina: Lucena (current Itaiópolis), Rio Vermelho, Massaranduba, Grã-Pará, Nova Galícia, Brusque and others.
-Rio Grande do Sul: Alfredo Chaves (now Veranópolis), Antônio Prado, Bento Gonçalves, Dom Feliciano, Mariana Pimentel, Ijuí, Guaraní das Missões, Áurea, Gaurama, Jaguari, Erechim, and others.
-São Paulo: São Bernardo, Pariquera-açu, City of São Paulo, and others.
-Espírito Santo: Águia Branca, Santa Leopoldina, and others.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/86/Santu%C3%A1rio_Nossa_Senhora_de_Azambuja_02.jpg/640px-Santu%C3%A1rio_Nossa_Senhora_de_Azambuja_02.jpg
Polish church in Brusque, state of Santa Catarina.

Regions of Origins

Brazil received Poles from all over the country, but mainly from Pomerania, Silesia, Carpathia and from big urban centres like Warszawa, Lublin and Kraków. Polish-controlled parts of Lithuania such as Kaunas (then Kovno) also contributed with a sizeable number of immigrants.

History

The first Polish immigrants arrived in the port of Itajaí, Santa Catarina, in August 1869. They were 78 Poles from the area of Southern Silesia. Commandant Redlisch, of the ship Victoria, brought people from Eastern Europe to settle in Brusque.

Brusque, in the State of Santa Catarina, received many Polish immigrants.They were in total 16 families, among them: Francisco Pollak, Nicolau Wós, Boaventura Pollak, Thomasz Szymanski, Simon Purkot, Felipe Purkot, Miguel Prudlo, Chaim Briffel, Simon Otto, Domin Stempke, Gaspar Gbur, Balcer Gbur, Walentin Weber, Antoni Kania, Franciszek Kania, André Pampuch and Stefan Kachel. The Poles were placed in the colonies Príncipe Dom Pedro and Itajaí, in the area of Brusque.

Polish immigration to Brazil was not as large as the immigration of Portuguese or Italians, however a significant number of Poles have settled in Brazil. From 1872 to 1959, 110,243 "Russian" citizens entered Brazil. In fact, the vast majority of them were Poles, since Poland was under Russian rule and ethnic Poles immigrated with Russian passports.

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-AoZrB6WVifo/UW2ZLsNZ9rI/AAAAAAAAAO4/YPLtjL45e3o/s1600/A+Imigra%C3%A7%C3%A3o+Polonesa+No+Paran%C3%A1.jpg
Polish immigrants in the port of the city of Santos, state of São Paulo.

The State of Paraná received the majority of Polish immigrants, who settled mainly in the region of Curitiba, in the towns of Mallet, Cruz Machado, São Matheus do Sul, Irati, and União da Vitória.
Most Polish immigrants to Southern Brazil were Catholics who arrived between 1870–1920 and worked as small farmers in the State of Paraná. Others went to the neighboring states of Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina and São Paulo, which is a state as well as a city. After the 1920s, many Polish Jews immigrated seeking refuge from Europe, settling mainly in the State of São Paulo. Today most Brazilian Jews are of Polish descent.

Celebrity Examples

Xuxa (Szusza!):
http://xegundoxoudaxuxa.zip.net/images/Xuxa_Meneghel.jpg

Ricardo Lewandowski (Cunt):
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/c3/Ricardo_Lewandowski_2011.jpg/389px-Ricardo_Lewandowski_2011.jpg

Thais Paczolek:
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-Q6QXu5qGXww/UGfO96NYdfI/AAAAAAAAADE/r2vbmnGcyqk/s1600/Tha%C3%ADs+Pacholek+3.jpg

Edson Zwaricz:
http://espndeportes-assets.espn.go.com/2003/photos2008/0620/m_Edson_Zwaricz1_580x326.jpg

Smaug
05-23-2018, 08:26 PM
British and Irish Immigration

Today

There are about 20.000 British and Irish Brazilians nowadays. The main cores of the British-Brazilian culture are São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro.

http://i271.photobucket.com/albums/jj132/BrunoInteriorano/Paranapiacaba/Paranapiacaba38.jpg
http://i122.photobucket.com/albums/o269/ncjrsa/Paranapiacaba/Imagem039.jpg
Paranapiacaba village is an old British town that dates back to the Imperial times, located in the countryside of the state of São Paulo.

Areas of Settlement

Most of British immigrants settled in the state of São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and Paraná. In São Paulo they settled in the southern half of the state and in the capital city, in Rio de Janeiro they settled in the capital city and in Paraná most of British communities are found on the northern half of the state.

Regions of Origins

British and Irish came from all the over the Islands, so there isn’t a region of predominance, with exception of the Irish, who came mostly from Dublin. As for the British, Scottish and Southern English were the regions that most of British-Brazilians descend. Brazil also received some Welsh immigration, mainly to Rio Grande do Sul in the 19th century and to São Paulo after WWI and WWII.

History

British are in Brazil since Imperial times. During the years of the Brazilian Empire many British came to Brazil to make their lives in many different ways. Many rich and powerful British industrials, businessmen and bank holders came to Brazil in this time.

The main British impact and legacy from the Imperial age is the railroad system they built. Most of the early railroads in Brazil were built by British companies, and in this time many British engineers migrated to Brazil. One example is the São Paulo Railway Company, responsible for building and managing the railroads in the province of São Paulo.

http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s320/kikimisato/PB180057.jpg
http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s320/kikimisato/PB180060.jpg
São Paulo Railway Company plate (first) and Old steam locomotive carrying a British flag, used for tourist purposes (second).

It was also during the last days of the Brazilian Empire that many Irish came to Brazil, most being males that would join the army and fight in the Cisplatine War (1825-1828). Many of Irish immigrants in Brazil had to change their last names into an easier kind of writing based in existing Portuguese names, replacing the "O'" (originally "grandson").

Regarding the Welsh, we can mention Thomas Benbow Phillips (1829 - 1915), who was a pioneer of the Welsh settlements in Brazil and, more successfully, Patagonia during the 19th century. He was born in either Manchester or Tregaron, where he grew up. Living in Manchester in 1848, he came into contact with cotton traders, who were eager to establish a colony in Brazil to grow cotton for their mills in Lancashire. Phillips travelled to Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil to begin making arrangements, and by the end of May 1851 had been joined by six groups of Welsh immigrants.

Phillips married a Brazilian woman, María Januaria Buena Florinal, but after her death in 1872 moved to the larger Welsh colony of Y Wladfa, that is a Welsh settlement in Argentina, which began in 1865 and occurred mainly along the coast of Chubut Province in the far southern region of Patagonia. Other groups of Welsh people also migrated to Chile, Argentia and Brazil after the WWII in smaller numbers.
The second migratory flux of British immigrants happened in the post WWII period. Many British came to Brazil, and now the immigrants were humble people seeking for a new life. Even though most of the British in this time went to countries within the Anglosphere, many came to South America, mainly to Argentina, Brazil and Chile.

http://www.florianopesaro.com.br/blogdofloriano/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/charles_miller2-300x300.jpg
http://apartamentoperdizes.files.wordpress.com/2012/03/prac3a7a-charles-miller.jpg
Charles Miller (first) and Charles Miller street, São Paulo (second). Born to a Scottish father and to an English mother in São Paulo, he introduced football in Brazil.

São Paulo is the state where most of the British-Brazilian population is concentrated, even though many can be found in Rio de Janeiro. The main difference is that while in Rio de Janeiro it predominates the Imperial-age immigration, in São Paulo it predominates the post-WWII immigration. São Paulo nowadays has lots of pubs and British cultural centres such as the Saint Andrew Society of São Paulo, where the members of the British diaspora try to keep their culture alive.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-4ufjspF8cDg/ViWWardTyvI/AAAAAAAAE18/RlbwFCK4Ypc/s1600/029a.JPG
Pipers gathering at Ibirapuera Park, São Paulo

Celebrity Examples

Giovanna Ewbank:
http://www.magariblu.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/giovanna-ewbank1.png

Eduardo Smith (Supla):
http://im.r7.com/record/files/2C95/948E/3737/0A4C/0137/3D7A/868C/3413/supla-grande.jpg

Helena Morley:
http://batalhadoibopee.files.wordpress.com/2010/04/vida-de-menina.jpg?w=604

[B]Richard Dave Court (Ritchie):
https://canecasdosnerds.com.br/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/maxresdefault.jpg

Smaug
05-23-2018, 08:26 PM
Lithuanian Immigration

Today

Nowadays there are about 200.000 Lithuanian-Brazilians, concentrated in the states of São Paulo, Paraná, Rio Grande do Sul and Rio de Janeiro.

https://static.panoramio.com.storage.googleapis.com/photos/large/9438230.jpg
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/1b/Koseliena-Sampa.jpg/360px-Koseliena-Sampa.jpg
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-KWVtuLc8Vvg/UP2bH0AywmI/AAAAAAAAAaE/Fyyp5cctZRA/s1600/Vila%2BZelina%2BI.jpg
Vila Zelina is the Lithuanian neighbourhood of São Paulo city: Vila Zelina Church (first), Lithuanian dishes in a restaurant (second) and a replica of the Freedom Monument, that stays in Vilnius (third)

Areas of Settlement

Most of Lithuanian-Brazilians can be found in the state of São Paulo, mainly in the capital city and in the city of Ribeirão Preto. Big communities can also be found in Rio Grande do Sul and Rio de Janeiro.

Regions of Origins

Lithuanians came from all over the country to Brazil, however most of them came from the cities of Kaunas and Vilnius, with also a sizable portion from Klaipeda (Memel).

History

The first Lithuanian to set foot on Brazilian soil, according to a record dated in 1866, was a certain colonel Andrius Višteliauskas. His mission was to aid the Brazilian armed forces in the Paraguayan War that was going on at that time. His experience in Brazil must have influenced people in his homeland, perhaps by his writings or perhaps after he traveled home. Therefore, a few years later a group of Lithuanian immigrants and their families arrived in Brazil. In 1890, twenty-five Lithuanian families entered the land of Brazil. Their destination was the newly established colony of Ijuí, situated on the red and fertile soil of the northwestern part of the state of Rio Grande do Sul.

Today the city of Ijuí is a prosperous town, based on Brazilian standards. From early on Ijuí was settled by peoples of different ethno-linguistic backgrounds, unlike some other towns in the region. For example, the town of Guaraní das Missões was settled mostly by Polish immigrants. On the other hand, Germans, who came from the old German colonies (the Altkolonie) located in the eastern part of the state, went on to settle the municipality of Cerro Largo (formerly known as Serro Azul) and to make it into the small town that it is today.

One can still meet descendants from that first group of Lithuanian immigrants that settled in the Ijuí area. In 1926, around thirty thousand Lithuanian immigrants arrived in Brazil. They went to work in the many coffee plantations (fazendas) throughout the State of São Paulo. Other groups of immigrants also were lured into the country at the time to fulfill labor shortages. São Paulo may have been the destination of most Lithuanians but they also went to settle in other states such as Rio de Janeiro and Paraná. The town of Castro, in Paraná, a state south of São Paulo, boasts that amongst Japanese, Russians and other ethnic groups their town was also founded by Lithuanian immigrants.

The slaves of Brazil had been freed in 1888. More and more in the following decades the coffee barons of the land tried to obtain laborers from other sources, mostly from White European sources.

http://1234voce.com.br/public/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/ribeirao-preto-.png
Ribeirão Preto in the countryside of São Paulo received many Lithuanian immigrants

It is very much doubtful that the Lithuanian immigrants settled in São Paulo ever had any contact with their compatriots who had established themselves further south in the state of Rio Grande do Sul a few decades earlier. However, in São Paulo Lithuanians developed strong social ties around church congregations. Most were Catholic but many also participated in Lutheran church services.

In 1930, the núcleo (small colony) of Barão de Antonina, was established in Itaporanga, São Paulo. The center of Lithuanian life in Brazil is Vila Zelina, a district in one of the biggest megalopolies of the world – the city of São Paulo. Everything seems to revolve around the Saint Joseph Catholic Church (São José). One can still taste some of the culinary of the Old World in this part of town. Easter eggs are still celebrated in the traditional way.

Celebrity Examples

Marcos Aidukaitis:
http://www.lds.org/bc/content/shared/content/images/leaders/marcos-a-aidukaitis-large.jpg

Angélica Ksyvickis:
https://www.terra.com.br/istoegente/edicoes/466/imagens/i54224.jpg

Victor Siaulys:
https://www3.al.sp.gov.br/repositorio/noticia/03-2009/victorsyaulisRAFAEL.jpg

Smaug
05-23-2018, 08:27 PM
Jewish Immigration

Today

There are about 96,500 Jews in Brazil today. The current Jewish community is mostly composed of Ashkenazi Jews of Polish and German descent and also Sephardic Jews of Spanish, Portuguese, and North African descent; among the North African Jews, a significant number are of Egyptian descent.

Brazilian Jews play an active role in politics, sports, academia, trade and industry, and are overall well integrated in all spheres of Brazilian life. Jews lead an open religious life in Brazil and there are rarely any reported cases of anti-semitism in the country. In the main urban centers there are schools, associations and synagogues where Brazilian Jews can practice and pass on Jewish culture and traditions.[/COLOR]

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/14/Centro_da_Cultura_Judaica,_SP,_2.jpg
Centre of Jewish Culture of São Paulo, shaped after the Torah

Areas of Settlement

The majority of Brazilian Jews live in the State of São Paulo, mainly in the capital city, but there are also sizeable communities in the States of Rio de Janeiro, Rio Grande do Sul, Minas Gerais, and Paraná.
Brazil today has the 10th largest Jewish community in the world and the 4th largest in Americas.

https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5505/11936303696_bc0e0b548e.jpg
Higienópolis is the main Jewish Neighbourhood of São Paulo

Regions of Origins

Most of the Sephardic Jews who came to Brazil were Portuguese, while most of the Ashkenazi Jews were Polish, German, Lithuanian and Russian.

History

Jews started settling in Brazil ever since the Inquisition reached Portugal in the 16th century. They arrived in Brazil during the period of Dutch rule, setting up in Recife the first synagogue in the Americas as early as 1636. Most of those Jews were Sephardic Jews who had fled the Inquisition in Spain and Portugal to the religious freedom of the Netherlands. Adam Smith attributed much of the development of Brazil's sugar industry and cultivation to the arrival of Portuguese Jews who were forced out of Portugal during the inquisition.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/7a/Kahal_Zur_Israel_%28exterior_1%29.jpg/398px-Kahal_Zur_Israel_%28exterior_1%29.jpg
Kahal Zur Israel Synagogue in Recife was the first Synagogue in Americas

It is estimated that at least 17 million Brazilians have Sephardic Jewish ancestry, most of whom are to be found to the northeast of the country. DNA testing has revealed that some Portuguese males have Sephardic ancestry; thus many Brazilians, most of whom have a degree of Portuguese ancestry, are also of Jewish ancestry, although most would not say so.

http://godaven.com/images/avatar/6869BCC.jpg
Beit Chabad of São Paulo was built after the Jewish Cultural Centre of New York

Waves of Jewish immigration occurred during the rise of Nazis in Europe. By the 1930’s, another wave of immigration brought thousands of Ashkenazi Jews arrived in Brazil. These new comers were mostly Polish, Lithuanian, German and Russian Jews, who settled mostly in São Paulo. Most of the current Jewish population in Brazil is Ashkenazi.

Celebrity Examples

Dan Stulbach:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/98/Dan_Stulbach.jpg/200px-Dan_Stulbach.jpg

Debora Bloch:
http://www.50emais.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Debora-Bloch.png

Tiago Leifert:
http://tv.i.uol.com.br/televisao/2010/02/03/tiago-leifert-jornalista-1265237938768_1024x768.jpg

Deborah Colker:
https://11arte.files.wordpress.com/2010/03/deborahcolker.jpg

Rabbi Henry Sobel:
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1c/Henrysobel21092006.jpg

Catarinense1998
05-23-2018, 08:27 PM
Good thread.Even the South Region is the most white, the biggest part of our heritage come from imigrants who came hete before this big wave.Azoreans 1746-1753, germans 1850 Blumenau and 1851 Joinville; some germans settlements near the litoral like São Pedro de Alcântara in 1829.Italians are biggest group that came to SC, but it is in later 19 century.

Smaug
05-23-2018, 08:27 PM
Lebanese and Syrian Immigration

Today

Although the exact number of Lebanese-Brazilians is disputed it is estimated that there are at least 6 million Brazilians of Lebanese origin. Despite being estimated at less than 4% of the population of the country, descendants of Lebanese immigrants occupied 10% of the parliament seats between 2014 and 2015.

Lebanese culture has influenced many aspects of Brazil's culture. In big cities in Brazil it is easy to find restaurants of Lebanese food, and dishes such as sfiha ("esfiha"), hummus, kibbeh ("quibe"), tahina, tabbouleh ("tabule") and halwa are very well known among Brazilians, even among those who are not of any Arabic descent.

Most Lebanese immigrants in Brazil have worked as traders who sell textiles and clothes and open new markets. Lebanese-Brazilians are well-integrated into Brazilian society and have plenty of well-known institutions, such as the Hospital Sírio-Libanês and the Clube Sírio.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b7/Catedral_Metropolitana_Ortodoxa_03.JPG
https://setorsaude.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Hospital-S%C3%ADrio-Liban%C3%AAs-promove-Encontro-Nacional-de-M%C3%A9dicos-do-Futuro.jpg
São Paulo Orthodox Cathedral (first) and Hospital Sírio-Libanês (second)

Areas of Settlement

Immigration of the Lebanese and Syrians to Brazil was concentrated mostly in the state of São Paulo, but also extended to the states of Minas Gerais, Goiás, Rio de Janeiro, and other parts of Brazil such as Rio Grande do Sul and Paraná

Between 1884 and 1933, 130,000 Lebanese people immigrated to Brazil—65% of them were Catholics (Maronite Catholics and Melkite Catholics), 20% were Eastern Orthodox, and 15% were Muslims (Shia, Sunni, and Druze). According to French Consulate reports from that time, Syrian-Lebanese immigrants in São Paulo and Santos were 130,000, in Pará 20,000, Rio de Janeiro 15,000, Rio Grande do Sul 14,000, and in Bahia 12,000. During the Lebanese Civil War (1975–90), around 32,000 Lebanese people immigrated to Brazil.

History

Arab immigration to Brazil started in the 1890s as Lebanese and Syrian people fled the political and economic instability of the Ottoman Empire; the majority were Christian but there were also many Muslims. Immigration peaked around World War II.

In the 19th century, most of them came from Lebanon and Syria and later from other parts of the Arab world. When they were first processed in the ports of Brazil, they were counted as Turks because they carried passports issued by the Turkish Ottoman Empire that ruled the present day territories of Lebanon and Syria. There were many causes for Arabs to leave their homelands in the Ottoman Empir, such as: overpopulation in Lebanon, conscription in Lebanon and Syria, and religious persecution by the Ottoman Turks.

http://museudaimigracao.org.br/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/familia-libanesa.jpg
Lebanese family in Brazil

Celebrity Examples

Tania Khalil:
https://www.terra.com.br/istoegente/edicoes/521/imagens/i139505.jpg

Geraldo Alckmin:
http://anoticia.rbsdirect.com.br/imagesrc/24319917.jpg?w=620

Malu Mader:
https://abrilclaudia.files.wordpress.com/2018/04/malu-mader-50-anos.png

Tony Kanaan:
https://storage.googleapis.com/ecm-prod/assets/1/pilote/7557/portrait_Tony-KANAAN_GR8R9878_359427.png

Thaila Ayala:
https://www.otvfoco.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/thaila-ayala.jpg

Smaug
05-23-2018, 08:28 PM
Japanese Immigration

Today

As of 2008, 100 years after the beginning of the Japanese immigration, many Japanese Brazilians belong to the third generation (sansei), who make up 41.33% of the community. First generation (issei) are 12.51%, second generation (nisei) are 30.85% and fourth generation (yonsei) 12.95%.

Accordingly to the IBGE, there are 1,6 million people of Japanese descent in Brazil and as of 2000 there were 70,932 Japanese-born immigrants living in the country (compared to the 158,087 found in 1970). Of these Japanese, 51,445 lived in São Paulo. Most of the immigrants were over 60 years old, because the Japanese immigration to Brazil has halted since the mid-20th century, when Japan achieved higher standards of living that those of Brazil.

The Japanese as a whole had very deep influences in the areas where they settled, including the introduction of their cuisine and arts. There are many institutions in the country founded and supported by the Japanese community, such as the Kumon School and the Benificência Nipo-Brasileira.

https://catracalivre.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/feira-da-liberdade-divulgacao.jpg
http://www.portalnikkei.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/resized_FOTO-TORII-SJCAMPOS.jpg
Liberdade Neighbourhood in São Paulo city (first) and Immigration Park in São José dos Campos, countryside of São Paulo (second)

Areas of Settlement

In the first seven years of immigration, 3.434 Japanese families (14.983 people) arrived in the country. The beginning of World War I in 1914 started a boom in Japanese migration to Brazil; such that between 1917 and 1940 over 164.000 Japanese came to Brazil, 75% of them going to São Paulo, where most of the coffee plantations were located. As a whole, the Japanese immigration was mostly concentrated in São Paulo and Paraná, where many colonies exist.

Japanese immigration to Brazil by period, 1906 – 1993
Years - Population
1906–1910 1,714
1911–1915 13,371
1916–1920 13,576
1921–1925 11,350
1926–1930 59,564
1931–1935 72,661
1936–1941 16,750
1952–1955 7,715
1956–1960 29,727
1961–1965 9,488
1966–1970 2,753
1971–1975 1,992
1976–1980 1,352
1981–1985 411
1986–1990 171
1991–1993 48
Total 242,643

History

The Japanese immigration to Brazil started in 1908 as an alternative for European immigrants to work for the state of São Paulo's expanding coffee industry. It peaked in the late 1920s and early 1930s, right in the face of growing anti-Japanese sentiment in Brazil. The Japanese immigrants appeared to the Brazilian government as undesirable and non-assimilable immigrants. As Asian, they did not contribute to the "whitening" process of the Brazilian people as desired by the ruling Brazilian elite. In this process of forced assimilation the Japanese, more than any other immigrant group, suffered the ethno-cultural persecution imposed during this period. The Japanese migrated to Brazil in mandatory family units and formed their own agricultural settlements once they competed their colono-labor contracts and became independent farmers.

Under Getúlio Vargas's nationalistic policies, a 1934 immigration law severely limited the entry of the Japanese. Strict legal restrictions were also imposed on them during Vargas's Estado Novo (1937–1945). Japanese immigration was eventually terminated in 1942, mainly due to the fact that Brazil declared war on Japan in the WWII. As of then, the number of Japanese immigrants reached 188,986 and at the end of the war, the Japanese were sharply divided among themselves over the defeat of Japan.

Having given up their hope of returning to their homeland, the Japanese and their descendants began to migrate on a large scale to the cities, especially São Paulo City. Japanese immigration resumed in 1953 and peaked in 1959–1960. A total of 53,657 post-war immigrants, including many single adult men, arrived in Brazil before 1993. By 1980, the majority of Japanese Brazilians had joined the urban middle class, and many were already mixed racially. In the mid-1980s, Japanese Brazilians' "return" to Japan began on a large scale, due to Brazil's troubled national economy. More than 310,000 Brazilian citizens were residing in Japan in June 2008, when the centenary of Japanese immigration was widely celebrated in Brazil. But the story does not end there: the global recession soon forced unemployed Brazilians and their Japanese-born children to return to Brazil.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/3a/Fam%C3%ADlia_Japonesa_em_Bastos_1930.jpg
Japanese family in Brazil, 1930

Celebrity Examples

Tomi Otahke:
http://imprensapublica.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/tomi.jpeg

Hugo Hoyama:
http://www.portalnikkei.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/Hugo-GHoyama.jpg

Daniele Suzuki:
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_UXHhyGV_Tfw/TQFSjTNfg8I/AAAAAAAAAJM/fqbuq-GlC9Q/s1600/Daniele%2BSuzuki.jpg

Lisa Ono:
https://i2.wp.com/silviakikuchi.jp/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/lisaono.jpg?fit=640%2C400

Newton Ishii:
https://abrilveja.files.wordpress.com/2018/02/untitled-135.jpg

Smaug
05-23-2018, 08:29 PM
American Immigration

Today

American-Brazilians, also called "Confederados" are a cultural sub-group amongst the many immigration groups in Brazil. They are the descendants of people who fled from the Confederate States of America to Brazil with their families after the American Civil War.

In Brazil, the Confederate flag has not previously had the racial stigma that has been attached to it in the United States. Descendants of the confederate expats gather annually to celebrate their history and maintain their traditions and culture alive. Many Confederados have traveled to the United States at the invitation of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, an American descendants' organization, to visit Civil War battlefields, attend reenactments or see where their ancestors lived in the United States.

The original Confederados continued many elements of American culture and established the first Baptist churches in Brazil. They also established public schools and provided education to their female children, which was unusual in Brazil at the time.

http://conteudo.imguol.com.br/c/noticias/94/2015/09/09/mackenzie-universidade-presbiteriana-mackenzie---campus-higienopolis-1441828976516_615x300.jpg
The Mackenzie University, São Paulo, was founded by American immigrants

Areas of Settlement

The Confederados settled mostry in the area around Santa Bárbara d'Oeste and Americana in the countryside of the state of São Paulo, which at the time were growing towns due to the production of sugar cane,making these new immigrants drift to these cities. Today, many descendant families still live on the original land owned by their ancestors, although he descendants of the original Confederados are mostly scattered throughout Brazil but maintain the headquarters of their descendant organization at the Campo Cemetery, in Santa Bárbara D'Oeste.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f5/Festa-confederada-brasil-estados-unidos-santa-b%C3%A1rbara-doeste.JPG
https://amp.businessinsider.com/images/5564ea2c71ca1be9008b456a-960-804.jpg
Festa Confederada (Confederate Party) in Santa Bárbada d'Oeste, countryside of São Paulo

History

At the end of the American Civil War in the 1860s, a migration of Confederates to Brazil began, with the total number of immigrants estimated in the thousands. They settled primarily in Southern and Southeastern Brazil: in Americana, Campinas, São Paulo, Santa Bárbara d'Oeste, Juquiá and New Texas. Emperor Dom Pedro II of Brazil was interested in having cotton crops due to the high prices and, through Freemasonry contacts, recruited experienced cotton farmers for his nation. Dom Pedro offered the potential immigrants subsidies and tax breaks. General Robert E. Lee advised Southerners not to flee to South America but many ignored his advice and set out to establish a new life away from the destruction of war.

Many Southerners who took the Emperor's offer had lost their land during the war, were unwilling to live under a conquering army, or simply did not expect an improvement in the South's economic position. In addition, Brazil would not outlaw slavery until 1888. Although a number of historians say that the existence of slavery was an appeal, Alcides Gussi, an independent researcher of State University of Campinas, found that only four families owned a total of 66 slaves from 1868 to 1875. The Confederates were the first organized Protestant group to settle in Brazil.

he American immigration to Brazil was started within that year of 1865, in small ships and sailboats hurriedly reshaped, "motivated more by the pain and feelings of despair than by the vessels themselves." They were exhausted men, women and children, many were very injured, others were sick and depressed, but they were determined to give a new start to their lives in faraway Brazil.

Between 1865 and 1885, almost ten thousand white Americans coming mainly from Alabama, Texas, Louisiana, South Carolina, Mississippi, Ohio, Virginia, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, Arkansas, Kentucky and Tennessee ran ashore in the ports of Belém, Vitória, Rio de Janeiro and Santos. Once they arrived, they had to redouble their so weakened energies and confront other faraway and tough trips around the land until they could reach the region of Campinas, whose climate and lands are similar to those of the Southern United States.

The first original Confederado known to arrive was the senator William H. Norris of Alabama—the colony at Santa Bárbara d'Oeste is sometimes called the Norris Colony. Dom Pedro's program was judged a success for both the immigrants and the Brazilian government. The settlers brought with them modern agricultural techniques and new crops such as watermelon, and pecans that soon spread among the native Brazilian farmers. Some foods of the American South also crossed over and became part of general Brazilian culture such as chess pie, vinegar pie, and southern fried chicken.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/53/Joseph_Withaker_e_Isabel_Norris.jpg
Joseph Whitaker and Isabel Norris, some of the first immigrants

Celebrity Examples

Rita Lee:
https://revistatrip.uol.com.br/dados/tpm/_imgBank/1398358140tpm141-bazar-021.jpg

Guy Ecker:
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-o3_ACYYZORU/UvGK-RFHO0I/AAAAAAAAE3w/6EdK6K7fcpw/s1600/Guy.jpg

Warwick Kerr:
http://www.unicamp.br/unicamp/unicamp_hoje/ju/dezembro2005/Fotos-Ju312Online/ju312pg07a.jpg

Ellen Gracie Northfleet:
http://www.globalframe.com.br/gf_base/empresas/MIGA/imagens/4627C45D33354621A01FC82353AEFDB619B7_ellengracie.j pg

David Neeleman:
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/69/Neeleman_2015.jpg/800px-Neeleman_2015.jpg

Smaug
05-23-2018, 08:34 PM
---------

TheMaestro
05-23-2018, 08:34 PM
Isabella Fiorentino, typical Italian eyes.

skain
05-23-2018, 08:36 PM
Dont forget the 2 millions of africans slaves who came after 1822.

Sundqvist
05-23-2018, 08:39 PM
that means, that the real Poles moved from Poland, and Poles after WWII are quite different

Marmara
05-23-2018, 08:42 PM
I knew a Christian Syrian from Brazil who was quite connected to his roots

KMack
05-23-2018, 08:42 PM
https://storage.googleapis.com/ecm-prod/assets/1/pilote/7557/portrait_Tony-KANAAN_GR8R9878_359427.png

One of my favorite race car drivers in the USA.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xBukPi73YzU

Smaug
05-23-2018, 08:46 PM
Isabella Fiorentino, typical Italian eyes.

I agree!


Dont forget the 2 millions of africans slaves who came after 1822.

Yes, but they were brought as slaves, I think it would be quite offensive to call it "immigration".


that means, that the real Poles moved from Poland, and Poles after WWII are quite different

Current Poles are German!


I knew a Christian Syrian from Brazil who was quite connected to his roots

My very own girlfriend is a Lebanese-Brazilian and yes, they are very connected with their roots, which I think is great because the food is amazing.


https://storage.googleapis.com/ecm-prod/assets/1/pilote/7557/portrait_Tony-KANAAN_GR8R9878_359427.png

One of my favorite race car drivers in the USA.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xBukPi73YzU

Aye, my and my old man used to watch and root for him.

Argentano
05-24-2018, 01:12 AM
this is excelent regarding emigration to brazil. Check the tables in the annex (page 23)

http://www.scielo.br/pdf/rsp/v8s0/03.pdf

QUICAS
05-24-2018, 02:25 AM
Good thread. But I had the impression that your numbers are very 2000's or very low estimated. Also, propably the Central West have more german influence than the Southeast.

Bolsonaro2018
05-24-2018, 03:19 AM
What about recent imigrants numbers? Roraima is already 15% venezuelan by now.

skain
05-24-2018, 03:26 AM
What about recent imigrants numbers? Roraima is already 15% venezuelan by now.

Its true that in south theres a Lot of recents african imigrants?

Bolsonaro2018
05-24-2018, 03:34 AM
Its true that in south theres a Lot of recents african imigrants?

I live in countryside, but from what I've seen in Curitiba there were a lot, despite most of them being haitians. Others are mainly from Nigeria and Senegal. I guess in southeast it is much higher than here tho.

dperucca
05-24-2018, 03:41 AM
How difficult is it to immigrate to Brazil from other countries?

skain
05-24-2018, 03:48 AM
I live in countryside, but from what I've seen in Curitiba there were a lot, despite most of them being haitians. Others are mainly from Nigeria and Senegal. I guess in southeast it is much higher than here tho.

Most are in São Paulo. I heard that most Haitians in Brazil leave the country for Chile, USA and Canadá.

skain
05-24-2018, 03:49 AM
How difficult is it to immigrate to Brazil from other countries?

Its Very easy. Thays why we are full of third world imigrants in a third world country.

dperucca
05-24-2018, 03:53 AM
Its Very easy. Thays why we are full of third world imigrants in a third world country.

Do you have to speak any Portuguese?

skain
05-24-2018, 03:54 AM
Do you have to speak any Portuguese?

Nope. Brazil is a joke is these question.

Bolsonaro2018
05-24-2018, 03:58 AM
Most are in São Paulo. I heard that most Haitians in Brazil leave the country for Chile, USA and Canadá.

Certainly not most, but some of them yes. For example, here in Londrina region they are the first immigrant group, 6x higher than the second place which is portuguese and japanese. Data removed from those with formal job, so it could be even more.

skain
05-24-2018, 04:09 AM
Certainly not most, but some of them yes. For example, here in Londrina region they are the first immigrant group, 6x higher than the second place which is portuguese and japanese. Data removed from those with formal job, so it could be even more.

I am against Haitians immigration here. I think they do not contribute anything to society.

Bolsonaro2018
05-24-2018, 04:11 AM
How difficult is it to immigrate to Brazil from other countries?

It is easy, we've 18k km of borders to protect in continental area, you dudes have something like 3k km with mexicans. Just imagine it. Even so it shouldnt be an issue, since Brazil is a 3rd world country, but this theory fall when part of our neighboors are like 5th world countries. Yesterday a group from Senegal, Mali and Nigeria arrived in coastal Brazil in a boat with 20 individuals, the funniest thing is that the flag's boat was haitian. I dont get it at all.

Bolsonaro2018
05-24-2018, 04:22 AM
I am against Haitians immigration here. I think they do not contribute anything to society.


https://youtu.be/5uMEejtXjcw

dperucca
05-24-2018, 04:31 AM
It is easy, we've 18k km of borders to protect in continental area, you dudes have something like 3k km with mexicans. Just imagine it. Even so it shouldnt be an issue, since Brazil is a 3rd world country, but this theory fall when part of our neighboors are like 5th world countries. Yesterday a group from Senegal, Mali and Nigeria arrived in coastal Brazil in a boat with 20 individuals, the funniest thing is that the flag's boat was haitian. I dont get it at all.

Sounds like some NWO stuff. Would it be difficult for an American to get a visa as a teacher there?

JamesJohnson
05-24-2018, 04:36 AM
Brazil is a GREAT country to immigrate to, every single Latino, Black, Brazilian, Ecuadorian, Syrian, Persian, Haitian, Asian, and whoever else should be given pamphlets on how wonderful a country Brazil is, in the goal that they immigrate to Brazil and become Brazilian citizens. Heck, I'd pay for their plane tickets.

Bolsonaro2018
05-24-2018, 04:39 AM
Sounds like some NWO stuff. Would it be difficult for an American to get a visa as a teacher there?

Well, I was talking about ilegal immigration, but legally it is harder no doubt. Not an expert, but I even think Brazil adopted some reciprocal legislation for United States immigrants. My city is almost a village, but I do know two americans teachers from Massachusetts who live here, I just should ask to them about it.

dperucca
05-24-2018, 04:42 AM
Well, I was talking about ilegal immigration, but legally it is harder no doubt. Not an expert, but I even think Brazil adopted some reciprocal legislation for United States immigrants. My city is almost a village, but I do know two americans teachers from Massachusetts who live here, I just should ask to them about it.

I was just curious. It seems like it is easier to be illegal (based on what I have read) than to be legal which makes it like the United States lol

Bolsonaro2018
05-24-2018, 04:47 AM
I was just curious. It seems like it is easier to be illegal (based on what I have read) than to be legal which makes it like the United States lol

Yeah. I'll try talk with them about it this saturday, then I can PM to you. Sorry not being capable to answer your question for now. Now I've to go, it is quite late here. Night you all.

Carlito's Way
05-24-2018, 04:52 AM
It is easy, we've 18k km of borders to protect in continental area, you dudes have something like 3k km with mexicans. Just imagine it. Even so it shouldnt be an issue, since Brazil is a 3rd world country, but this theory fall when part of our neighboors are like 5th world countries. Yesterday a group from Senegal, Mali and Nigeria arrived in coastal Brazil in a boat with 20 individuals, the funniest thing is that the flag's boat was haitian. I dont get it at all.

you niggas make it seem like 20,000 arrived in boats and shit
immigrants in your country im 100% sure dont even make up more than 2%
yall niggas aint america and no one really wants to move to brazil in large doves
most of your haitians already left brazil for chile, usa, canada and even mexico

QUICAS
05-25-2018, 10:25 PM
you niggas make it seem like 20,000 arrived in boats and shit
immigrants in your country im 100% sure dont even make up more than 2%
yall niggas aint america and no one really wants to move to brazil in large doves
most of your haitians already left brazil for chile, usa, canada and even mexico

No, there are tons of haitians here. They pass all the timr in the streets looking for jobs, at night they sleep in humanitarian centers and receive donated food by the population. They dont have how to get jobs, not even brazilians have jobs, our cities dont even have gasoline, the airports dont have fuel to airplanes, its a complete chaos, I never imagine such depression in this country. Lastday o lot of flights to Brazil were cancelled. And Im even not talking about food and energy shortages or traports strikes we are having since 2010. I never expected that decadency.

Carlito's Way
05-25-2018, 10:53 PM
No, there are tons of haitians here. They pass all the timr in the streets looking for jobs, at night they sleep in humanitarian centers and receive donated food by the population. They dont have how to get jobs, not even brazilians have jobs, our cities dont even have gasoline, the airports dont have fuel to airplanes, its a complete chaos, I never imagine such depression in this country. Lastday o lot of flights to Brazil were cancelled. And Im even not talking about food and energy shortages or traports strikes we are having since 2010. I never expected that decadency.

haitians in brazil dont even represent 1%, not even 0.1% of the population bro lol most of them have already left for Chile, Mexico, Canada, USA

Marinus
05-25-2018, 11:01 PM
How difficult is it to immigrate to Brazil from other countries?


Do you have to speak any Portuguese?


Sounds like some NWO stuff. Would it be difficult for an American to get a visa as a teacher there?


I was just curious. It seems like it is easier to be illegal (based on what I have read) than to be legal which makes it like the United States lol


How difficult is it to immigrate to Brazil from other countries?

Funnily enough, Brazil is pretty hard to immigrate to legally, but it's easier if you're a Portuguese citizen. For Americans it'll depend on what you plan on doing here, if you're going to teach, is it English? If yes, then you could contact one of our many English schools, get them to sign you a contract and an inviatation letter of some sort and it would be quite easy to get a work visa, as speaking English is very sought after over here, and our English intructors are awful, so a native speaker would be a God send to the English schools. Once you get here, then getting all the right documentation is going to be a pain in the arse, as everything is needlessly complicated.

If you would like to teach overseas, then Portugal/Spain would be much better alternatives to Brazil.

But it's far easier to get here illegally through our scantly guarded borders. :lol:

QUICAS
05-25-2018, 11:32 PM
haitians in brazil dont even represent 1%, not even 0.1% of the population bro lol most of them have already left for Chile, Mexico, Canada, USA

Majority of immigrants in Brazil are illegal, everything is informal with them. We have at least 150 thousand haitians, being 50 thousand registred. But bolivians are the champions by far.

Bolsonaro2018
05-26-2018, 01:13 AM
you niggas make it seem like 20,000 arrived in boats and shit
immigrants in your country im 100% sure dont even make up more than 2%
yall niggas aint america and no one really wants to move to brazil in large doves
most of your haitians already left brazil for chile, usa, canada and even mexico

The boat's issue was inside of the context discussion, about haitians leaving, we've some of them going to Chile and USA, they are not going to Mexico, otherwise they would go directly, which is closer. Mexico is a modus operandi to cross US border. 20.000 refugees for now is nothing close to 60.000 venezuelans who arrived in few months running away Maduro's Socialist Dictatorship, now the government is sending them to mid-south region through airplain, since it became a humanity crises and there is no infrastructure to support tons of them in a place like Boa Vista. Not even mentioning bolivians, they are above half million here. It is way harder to count illegal immigrants than anything, how I said, weve 18k km of borders to protect.

Carlito's Way
05-26-2018, 03:22 AM
Majority of immigrants in Brazil are illegal, everything is informal with them. We have at least 150 thousand haitians, being 50 thousand registred. But bolivians are the champions by far.

thats bullshit, no way you have 150, 000 bro lol its much less than that, and like i mentioned, 90% of them already left Brazil for better countries like Chile, Mexico, Canada, USA
and even if they were 150 thousands of them, they wouldnt even make 1% of the population of Brazil, but much less than that, 150 thousand is such a insignificant number compared to the overall population of Brazil which is 209,077,000

Carlito's Way
05-26-2018, 03:31 AM
The boat's issue was inside of the context discussion, about haitians leaving, we've some of them going to Chile and USA, they are not going to Mexico, otherwise they would go directly, which is closer. Mexico is a modus operandi to cross US border. 20.000 refugees for now is nothing close to 60.000 venezuelans who arrived in few months running away Maduro's Socialist Dictatorship, now the government is sending them to mid-south region through airplain, since it became a humanity crises and there is no infrastructure to support tons of them in a place like Boa Vista. Not even mentioning bolivians, they are above half million here. It is way harder to count illegal immigrants than anything, how I said, weve 18k km of borders to protect.

they are going to Mexico, what are you talking about? lol they have been coming here since their earthquake, i see them all the time when i go to Tijuana


60.000 venezuelans is nothing compared to a population of 209,077,000, it wouldnt even make 0.1% of Brazil lol like i said, no one is really trying to immigrate in large doves in Brazil, and just like Haitians, those same Venezuelans will start leaving Brazil for better countries who have lower employment and better economy plus similar language

Heather Duval
05-26-2018, 03:33 AM
Yes, but they were brought as slaves, I think it would be quite offensive to call it "immigration".





Some dont.

Em 1872, os escravos representavam 15,2% da população brasileira. Os estrangeiros somavam 3,8%, a maioria deles portugueses , alemães , africanos livres e franceses .
https://pt.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Censo_demogr%C3%A1fico_do_Brasil_de_1872

Heather Duval
05-26-2018, 03:38 AM
Btw, there are many Asians here in Rio de janeiro selling pastels/joelhos and things like that. I buy it almost everyday lol
https://destemperados.s3.amazonaws.com/arquivos/ckeditor/D27wF74hQf9x2cpn1w0/5819cd97204175.44726839.jpg
http://www.consumidor.rj.gov.br/procon/assets/arquivos/imagens/20150313_122233edt_1426285143.55.jpg
https://ogimg.infoglobo.com.br/in/15921331-d3c-360/FT1086A/420/2015-809026065-2015041838875.jpg_20150418.jpg

Latinus
05-26-2018, 03:41 AM
Most of them are Chinese. That's why these snacks doesn't have a good reputation regarding hygiene.
In São Paulo, there are many Koreans.

Heather Duval
05-26-2018, 03:42 AM
Most of them are Chinese. That's why these snacks doesn't have a good reputation regarding hygiene.
In São Paulo, there are many Koreans.

But still yummi. I love Pastel.
http://geradormemes.com/media/created/mlet6q.jpg

Latinus
05-26-2018, 03:50 AM
Family of Venezuelans living in Rio de Janeiro. The government is transfering the imigrants from Roraima to other regions/states.
https://media.metrolatam.com/2018/05/11/101276536img3525-e62efc26773fff70f8692ea72a949de2-1200x600.jpg

They are selling Arepas, a traditional food of their country. I would say the boy with the Adidas shirt is the most atypical of them regarding RJ phenotypes.

frdfgcg
05-26-2018, 03:59 AM
I would immigrate to Brazil just for Medwomen.:kissing-butt:

QUICAS
05-26-2018, 04:39 AM
Chineses are well-know by their terrible hygiene

Heather Duval
05-26-2018, 04:55 AM
Chineses are well-know by their terrible hygiene

people here often calls them japas lol no one can tell apart them