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Aemma
03-26-2011, 02:48 AM
Can the conceptual framework of memes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meme) adequately explain concepts, especially the life cycle of, such things as "culture" or "ethnicity"?

Are certain cultures or ethnicities just one meme away from extinction?

Discuss. :)

Beorn
03-26-2011, 03:02 AM
Can the conceptual framework of memes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meme) adequately explain concepts, especially the life cycle of, such things as "culture" or "ethnicity"?

Yes.


Are certain cultures or ethnicities just one meme away from extinction?

Yes.

Example: English people are not "white". English people are those who are born in England only. There exists no such entity which can call itself 'English culture'.

So ends the meme.

Enter right the next meme.

Oreka Bailoak
03-26-2011, 04:42 AM
Can the conceptual framework of memes adequately explain concepts, especially the life cycle of, such things as "culture" or "ethnicity"?
Meme can explain culture to an extent yes, but ethnicity no. The definition even says this... " as genes transmit biological information, memes can be said to transmit idea and belief information." In other words, ethnicity is not a belief but a biological construct that can be tested and verified as opposed to an un-measurable idea like culture (though behaviors linked to cultural differences can be measured).


Are certain cultures or ethnicities just one meme away from extinction?

No, for the major cultures currently. Though this depends upon what you define as culture- for me it is ideas like Religion, Atheism, traditional families, major shared behaviors- and none of those are going to be gone anytime soon.

As for ethnicity, I can see how some people would confuse the idea of ethnicity by believing it to be social construct rather than a shared genetic bond. This ties in really well with the previous post....


Example: English people are not "white". English people are those who are born in England only. There exists no such entity which can call itself 'English culture'.
Being English nationally and English genetically are completely different- one is rooted in verifiable biological foundations and the other is merely an extremely general idea plus living location. "English Culture" has never truly been defined so it is open to interpretation as to who personifies it and who doesn't.

Beorn
03-26-2011, 04:52 AM
Being English nationally and English genetically are completely different

They are one and the same. Nation is a dirty word. It required a new meaning. A meaning which could be twisted to suit the ends of those who wish to see the ultimate destruction of certain nations.

To be genetically English is to be of the English nation.


"English Culture" has never truly been defined so there is no one group that can claim an undefined idea.

The Irish were culturally English then? Perhaps the Inuits were chattering away about Beowulf on cold nights? To this very day there exists Arabic tribes who insist they are direct descendants of Hengist and Horsa.

Oreka Bailoak
03-26-2011, 05:00 AM
To be genetically English is to be of the English nation.
I understand what you're saying that political correctness has changed the meaning of English to suit a social construct rather than a genetically based reality. I just can't tell if you're actually agreeing with that or being a bit sarcastic.

But regardless, you should read the book "Origin of the British" by Stephen Oppenheimer if you haven't (It's a bit boring but understanding identity is very important).

http://www.amazon.com/Origins-British-New-Prehistory-Britain/dp/1845294823/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1301115416&sr=8-1

^The English genetic identity has been defined back to the creation of the Isles during the last Ice Age.