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View Full Version : Great human inventions by country and chronological order



Root
10-03-2018, 10:23 AM
https://www.oxford-royale.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/lightbulbs-banner-685x250.jpg





Disclaimer: There are tens of thousands of human inventions through the ages and around the globe. The aim of this page is not to be extensive or encyclopedic, but rather to attempts to give an overview of the greatest and most useful inventions, those that have beeen fundamental to shape modern society as we know it. Feel free to suggest new additions, although I will set a maximum limit to 100 inventions.


Here are a few rules about what can or cannot be listed:




Discoveries, scientific concepts and theories are excluded from the list.
There are often plenty of minor improvements and variants to existing technologies. Only the first invention or very important improvements (e.g. from black & white to colour photography) can be accepted.
Games and sports are not listed because they are not essential inventions for the progress of humanity..
A lot of complex modern technologies, such as space flight, nuclear power, or anything related to computers or the Internet are the result of the combined research of thousands of people around the world and therefore cannot be listed as single inventions here.
Some inventions have had a lot of pionneers, who may have developed a technology earlier, but only partially or in a non functional way. A famous example of early airplanes. Only the first functional invention is taken into account.
Inventions have to be specific, not vague categories like agriculture or chemistry.





Austria-Hungary



Transistor
Remote control



Belgium



Newspaper
Saxophone



Czech Republic



Soft contact lenses



France



Adding machine
Pressure cooker
Hot air balloon
Parachute
Submarine
Ambulance service
Photography
Airship
Helicopter
Animation
Cinema




Germany



Printing press
Newspaper
Clarinet
Pocket watch
Automated calculator
Light bulb
Microphone
TV
Petrol/gasoline & Diesel engines
Automobile (+engine, differential gear...)
Parachute (bagged)
Motorcycle
Jet engine
LCD screen
Walkman




Italy



Glasses
Viol and cello
Mechanical clock
Violin
Thermometer
Barometer
Piano
Telephone
Radio
AC motor



Netherlands



Microscope
Telescope
Pendulum clock
Mercury thermometer
Audio tape
Video tape
CD
CD-ROM




Russia



Parachute (knapsack)
Tramway (electric)
Radio (receiver)
Tube TV
Helicopter




Sweden



Astronomical lenses
Dynamite




Switerland



Comic strips
Wrist watch




United Kingdom



Postage stamp
Fire extinguisher
Magazine
Steam engine
Refrigerator
Gas turbine
Alternating current
Light bulb
Locomotive
Railway
Lawn mower
Gas stove/cooker
Negative & colour photography
Metro/Subway
Radio
Loudspeaker
Jet engine
Video Games





Canada



Quartz watch



China



Paper money
Navigational compass
Firearms




Japan



CD-ROM
MD




USA



Steam boat
Submarine
Refrigerator
Alternating current
Telegraph
Tramway
Dishwasher
Regrigerator
Vacuum cleaner
Radio (transmission)
Phonograph
Cash register
AC motor
Zipper
Electric stove/cooker
Electronic TV & TV Broadcast
Microwave oven
Atomic clock
Charge/credit card
Electronic calculator
Video games
Laserdisk
Photocopier
Air Conditioner
Tractor
Traffic lights
Parking meter






Inventions by chronological order




Paper currency (7th century, China)

Navigational compass (11th century, China)

Firearms (12th century, China)

Glasses (1280's, Italy)

Mechanical clock (1335, Italy)

Printing Press (c. 1440, Germany)

Invented by Johannes Gutenberg.
Viol (viola da gamba) and Cello (late 15th and 16th century, Italy)

Pocket watch (1510, Germany)

Invented by Peter Henlein.
Violin (Early 16th century, Italy)

Thermometer (1593-1714)



1593 : Invented by Galileo Galilei (Italy)
1714 : Mercury thermometer invented by Daniel Gabriel Fahrenheit (Poland/Netherlands)

Microscope (1595, Netherlands)

Invented by Zacharias Janssen.
Telescope



late 11th century : astronomical lenses (Sweden)
13th century : experimental telescopes built by Francis Bacon (UK)
1595/1608 : refracting telescope (Netherlands)
1609 : improved by Galileo (Italy)

Newspaper (1605, Belgium/France/Germany)

The world's first printed newspapers were the Relation aller fürnemmen und gedenckwürdigen Historien published in Strasbourg (Germany at the time, now France), and the Nieuwe Tijdingen, published the same year in Antwerp (part of the Spanish Netherlands at the time, now Belgium).
Calculator (1623-1954)



1623 : automatic calculator invented by Wilhelm Schickard (Germany)
1642 : adding machine invented by Blaise Pascal (France)
1954 : electronic calculator invented by IBM (USA)

Barometer (1643, Italy)

Invented by Evangelista Torricelli.
Daily newspaper (1645, Germany)

The Einkommende Zeitungen in Lepizing.
Pendulum clock (1657, Netherlands)

Invented by Christiaan Huygens.
Pressure cooker (1679, France)

Invented by Denis Papin.
Postage stamps (1680, England)

Adhesive stamp invented in 1840 in Britain
Clarinet (1690, Germany)

Invented by Johann Christoph Denner.
Steam engine (1698, UK)

Invented by Thomas Savery in 1698, and improved by James Watt in 1769.
Piano (early 1700's, Italy)

Invented by Bartolomeo Cristofori in Florence.
Fire extinguisher (England, 1723)

Patented in England in 1723 by Ambrose Godfrey.
Magazine (England, 1731)

The Gentleman's Magazine was the world's first general-interest magazine. Refrigerator (1748-1856, Scotland/USA)



1748 : first known method of artificial refrigeration was demonstrated by William Cullen (Scotland).
1805 : first refrigerator invented by Oliver Evans (USA).
1834 : first patent for a vapor-compression refrigeration system granted to Jacob Perkins (USA).
1842 : first system for refrigerating water to produce ice developed by John Gorrie (Scotland-USA).
1848 : first commercial vapor-compression refrigerator developed by Alexander Twining (USA). It was commercialised in 1856.

Hot air balloon (France, 1782-83)

Invented by the brothers Josef and Etienne Montgolfier.
Parachute (France/Germany/Russia)



1785 : first modern parachute invented by Jean Pierre Blanchard (France).
1890's : Hermann Lattemann and his wife Käthe Paulus jump with bagged parachutes (Germany).
1911 : knapsack parachute invented by Gleb Kotelnikov (Russia).

Steam boat (1786, USA)

First built by John Fitch.
Engine (1791-1939)



1791 : Gas turbine patented by John Barber (England).
1826 : Reciprocating internal combustion engine patented by Samuel Morey (USA)
1867 : Petrol engine developed by Nikolaus Otto (Germany)
1892 : Diesel engine invented by Rudolph Diesel (Germany)
1924-57 : Rotary engine developed by Felix Wankel (Germany)
1936-39 : Jet engine developed simultaneously by Frank Whittle (England) and Hans von Ohain (Germany).

Submarine (1800, USA/France)

Invented by American Robert Fulton commissioned by Napoleon. First launched in France.
Ambulance service (early 1800's, France)

Modern method of army surgery, field hospitals and the system of army ambulance corps invented by Dominique Jean Larrey, surgeon-in-chief of the Napoleonic armies.
Locomotive (1804, UK)

Invented by Richard Trevithick. First Steam Locomotive invented by George Stephenson in 1814.
Railway (1820, UK)

The idea of the railway dates back to Roman times, 2000 years ago, when horse-drawn vehicles were set on cut-stone tracks. In 1802, the first modern horse-drawn train appeared in England, and the first steam powered train was however launched in 1820, also in England.
Comic strips (1820's, Switzerland)

Swiss Rodolphe Toepffer was probably the first modern cartoonist.
Photography (1825-1861)



1825 : First photograph (France)
1840 : Silver photo (France)
1840 : Negative (UK)
1861 : Colour photography invented by James Clerk Maxwell (Scotland)

Gas stove/cooker (1826, England)

First patented and manufactured by James Sharp.
Lawn mower (1827, England)

Invented by Edwin Beard Budding.
Tramway (1828-1880)



1828 : first horse-drawn carriage on rail in Baltimore (USA).
1868 : first cable-car in New York (USA).
1873 : first steam-powered tram.
1880 : first electric tram in St. Petersburg (Russia) and the next year in Berlin (Germany).

Alternating current (1830-31, UK/USA)

Discovered independently around the same time by the Englishman Michael Faraday and the American Joseph Henry.
Light bulb (1835, UK/Germany)



1835 : first Incandescent light bulb invented by James Bowman Lindsay (UK).
1854 : first practical light bulb invented by Heinrich Goebel (Germany).

Saxophone (1840's, Belgium)

Invented by Adolphe Sax.
Telegraph (1844, USA)

Invented by Samuel Morse.
Telephone (1849, Italy)

The invention of the telephone has long been credited to the Scot Alexander Graham Bell in 1876. However, the Italian Antonio Meucci is now recognised to have invented the device as early as 1849.
Dishwasher (1850-1886, USA)

Steam-powered airship (1852, France)

Invented by Henri Giffard.
Helicopter (1861, France)

The earliest flying toys resembling the principle of a helicopter first appeared in China around 400 BCE. More advanced models were developed in Russia and France in the second half of the 18th century. The first small steam-powered model was invented by Gustave de Ponton d'Amécourt, who also coined the word "helicopter". New models were developed mainly in France, notably by Emmanuel Dieuaide in 1877, Dandrieux in 1878, Jacques and Louis Breguet in 1906, or Paul Cornu in 1907. The first turbine-powered helicopter in the world was not built until 1951, in the USA.
Metro/Subway (1863, Britain)

The London Underground was the first rapid transit network in the world.
Vacuum cleaner (1865, USA)

Dynamite (1866, Sweden)

Invented by Alfred Nobel.
Wrist watch (1868, Switzerland => Patek Philippe & Co.)

Radio (1874-96)



1874 : Radio waves identified by by James Clerk Maxwell (Scotland).
1875 : Thomas Edison patents electrostatic coupling system (USA).
1895 : first radio receiver developed by Alexander Stepanovich Popov (Russia).
1895 : first successful radio transmission acheived by Guglielmo Marconi (Italy/UK). Commercial radio patented the next year.

Loudspeaker (1876, Scotland)

Invented by Alexander Graham Bell.
Phonograph (1877, USA)

Invented by Thomas Alva Edison, although based on France-born Leon Scott's 1857 phonautograph.
Microphone (1877, Germany)

Invented by Emil Berliner.
Cash register (1879, USA)

Invented by James Ritty.
Television (1884-1927)



First TV => 1884, Germany
TV tube => 1907, Russia
Electronic TV & Broadcast => 1927, USA

Motorcycle (1885, Germany)

First designed and built by Gottlieb Daimler and Wilhelm Maybach
AC motor (1885-87, Italy/USA)

"Commutatorless" alternating current induction motors seem to have been independently invented by Galileo Ferraris and Nikola Tesla. Ferraris demonstrated a working model of his single-phase induction motor in 1885, and Tesla built his working two-phase induction motor in 1887.
Car/Automobile (1886, Germany)

Developed independently and simultaneously by Carl Benz in Mannheim, amd Gottlieb Daimler and Wilhelm Maybach in Stuttgart.
Zipper (1891, USA)

Invented by Whitcomb L. Judson.
Animation (1892, France)

First animated film created by Emile Reynaud.
Tractor (1892, USA)



first practical gasoline-powered tractor built by John Froelich in 1892.
irst practical caterpillar tracks for use in tractors developed by Benjamin Holt in 1904.

Cinema (1894, France)

Cinematograph invented by the Lumiere brothers.
Electric stove/cooker (1896, USA)

First patented by William S. Hadaway.
Remote control (1898, Austria-Hungary)

First developed in 1893 by Nikola Tesla.
Air Conditioner (1902, USA)

Invented by Willis Carrier.
Traffic lights (1914, USA)

Transistor (1925, Austria-Hungary)

Invented by Julius Edgar Lilienfeld and patented in Canada. William Shockley and a co-worker at Bell Labs, Gerald Pearson, had built operational versions from Lilienfeld's patents.
Parking meter (1935, USA)

Helicopter (1939, Russia)

Developed by Igor Sikorsky.
Microwave oven (1947, USA)

Invented by Percy Spencer.
Atomic clock (1949, USA)

Charge/credit card (1950, USA => Diner's Club)
Video Games (1951-58, USA/UK)

Invention disputed between 3 people, 2 Americans and a Briton.
Laserdisk (1958, USA; commercialised by MCA and Philips in 1972)

Photocopier (1959, USA => Xerox)

Soft contact lenses (1961, Czech)

Invented by Otto Wichterle.
Cassette tape (1967, Netherlands => Philips)

LCD screen (1968, Germany)

Quartz watch (1969, Japan => Seiko)

Video tape (1972, Netherlands - Philips, later replaced by JVC's VHS)

Walkman (1977, Germany => commercialised by the Japanese Sony from 1979)

Compact Disk (1982, Netherlands/Germany - Philips)

CD-ROM (1985, Netherlands/Japan => Philips/Sony)

Minidisk (1991, Japan => Sony)

Teutone
10-03-2018, 10:50 AM
Supringly all nations included that I see as top of civilisation if Spanish inventions were included.

Kamal900
10-03-2018, 10:51 AM
Thank you Americans for the invention of A/C's. I could not be able to stand the heat of this country.

Root
10-03-2018, 11:47 AM
Supringly all nations included that I see as top of civilisation if Spanish inventions were included.



I totally agree that some European states such as Ireland, Spain, Portugal, Norway, Denmark, Finland have been missed, not to mention that the inventions shown above look quite restricted. The current list of the countries has to be more expanded, it's also desirable to combine text with images in one place..

Odin
02-09-2019, 11:04 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHaupel_r5Y

UltimatePagan
07-26-2019, 12:08 PM
bump

renaissance12
09-26-2019, 02:00 PM
Who invented the really first internal combustion engine ?... really working

JamesBond007
09-26-2019, 02:49 PM
Who invented the really first internal combustion engine ?... really working

I would guess the Scotsman, from Great Britain, James Watt because the industrial revolution was ushered in like right after that. I mean the first one as in really working -- that sense : smaller and more efficient.

ixulescu
09-26-2019, 03:14 PM
Almost all the inventions in the OP list were invented and reinvented in many places. Ultimately, only inventors from powerful economies get the credit, because only they are able to secure funds to make such inventions practical enough to be able to sell them.

For instance, a little know fact is that first plane to lift off by its own means was made by a Romanian in 1906. This was of course after Wright brothers plane, but unlike the latter it didn't require a catapult - the Romanian plane had a landing gear (Wright brothers' plane didn't).

A Romanian inventor also built the first helicopter able to take-off in 1922. Another Romanian installed an early version of a jet engine (a motorjet) in a plane in 1910. All of this Romanian pioneering work in aviation didn't matter, because Romanian inventors couldn't gather funds to make their inventions marketable.


http://fly.historicwings.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/HighFlight-TraianVuia4-1024x640.jpg

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/ff/De_Bothezat_Quadrotor.jpg

http://www.imperialtransilvania.com/typo3temp/pics/C_11f045e42b.jpg

Aldaris
09-26-2019, 07:05 PM
Almost all the inventions in the OP list were invented and reinvented in many places. Ultimately, only inventors from powerful economies get the credit, because only they are able to secure funds to make such inventions practical enough to be able to sell them.

For instance, a little know fact is that first plane to lift off by its own means was made by a Romanian in 1906. This was of course after Wright brothers plane, but unlike the latter it didn't require a catapult - the Romanian plane had a landing gear (Wright brothers' plane didn't).

A Romanian inventor also built the first helicopter able to take-off in 1922. Another Romanian installed an early version of a jet engine (a motorjet) in a plane in 1910. All of this Romanian pioneering work in aviation didn't matter, because Romanian inventors couldn't gather funds to make their inventions marketable.


http://fly.historicwings.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/HighFlight-TraianVuia4-1024x640.jpg

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/ff/De_Bothezat_Quadrotor.jpg

http://www.imperialtransilvania.com/typo3temp/pics/C_11f045e42b.jpg

Yeah, such lists are far from giving a complete picture. They're not made by scientist either, but by journalist, who generally know little about scientific methodology and ignore every discovery made by people from all over the world that led to the said invention in the first place, which is always the most important part behind any technological progress. Few remarkable individuals doing all the work is a thing of ancient world and Hollywood. Not to mention that giving all the credit behind our modern things to inventors of their primitive prototype is simply disrespectful to the scientists who've eventually made some ridiculous wood and cloth devices into MiGs.

sean
09-26-2019, 07:15 PM
I don't need to post anything.

The Internet itself, yes, this very thread is the result of an Englishman's genius.

Thanks Tim Berners-Lee.

Daco Celtic
09-26-2019, 07:27 PM
All the best inventions are American


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sRWtFVFSx5I

https://youtu.be/bQlpDiXPZHQ

https://youtu.be/GG43jyZ65R8

https://youtu.be/94_BPHQCgWM

Sundqvist
09-26-2019, 07:59 PM
Yeah!

https://youtu.be/O0N4YJnTG9Q

JamesBond007
09-26-2019, 08:06 PM
I don't need to post anything.

The Internet itself, yes, this very thread is the result of an Englishman's genius.

Thanks Tim Berners-Lee.

Actually, it is a bit more complicated than that. The internet existed before Tim Berners-Lee it was invented by the Americans at the ARPANET followed by the NFSNET it was used by scientists and enginers. What I mean by the internet existing before Tim's World Wide Web is things like email, usenet, gopher, IRC and the protocols the internet runs on, tcp/ip existed before his invention.

However, I think the American (probably of English descent) William Shockley invented the integrated circuit (the best known integrated circuit is the CPU) so if it wasn't for that then there would be no modern computers at all nor smartphones.

Beyond that, the list notes transistors in Austro-Hungary but it was really Wiliam Shockley an English American who invented the transistor. Also, it notes Blaise Pascal for the counting machine but neglects Charles Babbage and Alan Turing.

So the list is wrong at least in one place but I don't feel like looking it over again.

coolfrenchguy
09-26-2019, 08:56 PM
fucking yankees and british who have stollen all the the french inventions by industrial spying,aside alan turing who broke the enigma machine code of course

The Micral N was the first commercially available microprocessor-based computer in 1973 and stollen by BULL with there fucking $$$$$$
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4b/Micral_P1160162.jpg/260px-Micral_P1160162.jpg

first langage machine in 1725,by Basile Bouchon by the punched card
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/56/Basile_Bouchon_1725_loom.jpg/300px-Basile_Bouchon_1725_loom.jpg
Basile Bouchon was a textile worker in the silk center in Lyon who invented a way to control a loom with a perforated paper tape in 1725.[1] The son of an organ maker, Bouchon partially automated the tedious setting up process of the drawloom in which an operator lifted the warp threads using cords.

This development is considered to be the first industrial application of a semi-automated machine.

The cords of the warp were passed through the eyes of horizontal needles arranged to slide in a box. These were either raised or not depending on whether there was not or was a hole in the tape at that point.[2] This was similar to the piano roll developed at the end of the 19th century and may have been inspired by the patterns that were traditionally drawn on squared paper.

Three years later, his assistant Jean-Baptiste Falcon expanded the number of cords that could be handled by arranging the holes in rows and using rectangular cards that were joined together in an endless loop.

Though this eliminated mistakes in the lifting of threads, it still needed an extra operator to control it and the first attempt at automation was made by Jacques Vaucanson in 1745. But it was not until 1805 that the wildly successful Jacquard mechanism was finally produced.

without the french : no modern micro-computers,no man in space ,no the apricity,no NASA/BELL/HP/THOMPSON/PHILIPS/no quantum fusion/BULL/ IBM /MICRO$OFT/APPLE/LENOVO/INTEL/AMD/SPACE-X/MOBILES etc..., no man on mars(hypotically),nothing,nada,niet! cappice!

it's not maybe the greatest on an the ethical field but :

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9c/Black_Powder_Close_Up.jpg/220px-Black_Powder_Close_Up.jpgGunpowder was invented in 9th-century China and spread throughout most parts of Eurasia by the end of the 13th century.[3] Originally developed by the Taoists for medicinal purposes, gunpowder was first used for warfare about 904 AD

Ymyyakhtakh
09-26-2019, 09:43 PM
However, I think the American (probably of English descent) William Shockley invented the integrated circuit (the best known integrated circuit is the CPU) so if it wasn't for that then there would be no modern computers at all nor smartphones.

Or if he didn't exist, other people would've developed his inventions a month later. Even though I think the black world had developed semiconductor technology earlier, but it was only released to the white world by groups like Shockley's group.

coolfrenchguy
09-26-2019, 09:51 PM
I would guess the Scotsman, from Great Britain, James Watt because the industrial revolution was ushered in like right after that. I mean the first one as in really working -- that sense : smaller and more efficient.

it seems not only one but three:

Eugenio Barsanti was an Italian engineer, who together with Felice Matteucci of Florence invented the first version of the internal combustion engine in 1853
"Specification of Eugene Barsanti and Felix Matteucci, Obtaining Motive Power by the Explosion of Gasses"

Jean Joseph Étienne Lenoir also known as Jean J. Lenoir (12 January 1822 – 4 August 1900[1]) was a Belgian engineer who developed the internal combustion engine in 1858

Alphonse Eugène Beau de Rochas (9 April 1815, Digne-les-Bains, Alpes-de-Haute-Provence – 27 March 1893) was a French engineer who originated the principle of the four-stroke internal-combustion engine. His achievement lay partly in his emphasizing the previously unappreciated importance of compressing the fuel–air mixture before ignition

WIKI gave etienne lenoir as the first,but barsanti's was more efficient and were "stollen" by nikolas otto because he died before finish it an let his assistant dealing the patent with nikolas otto

it's seems like it's one of the first european invention and sound like a joke : "an italian,a belgian ,a french and a german are in a boat,the italian fall to water,guess who pushed him?"

honestly Barsanti was probably the first followed by Lenoir from the works of Beau Rochas or vice versa stollen and cope by Nikolas Otto later,but if you want there is no clear cut of who belongs the first patent

frankhammer
09-27-2019, 12:16 AM
Almost all the inventions in the OP list were invented and reinvented in many places. Ultimately, only inventors from powerful economies get the credit, because only they are able to secure funds to make such inventions practical enough to be able to sell them.

For instance, a little know fact is that first plane to lift off by its own means was made by a Romanian in 1906. This was of course after Wright brothers plane, but unlike the latter it didn't require a catapult - the Romanian plane had a landing gear (Wright brothers' plane didn't).

A Romanian inventor also built the first helicopter able to take-off in 1922. Another Romanian installed an early version of a jet engine (a motorjet) in a plane in 1910. All of this Romanian pioneering work in aviation didn't matter, because Romanian inventors couldn't gather funds to make their inventions marketable.


[]

http://www.ctie.monash.edu.au/hargrave/pearse1.html

Man's First Powered Flight

Richard Pearse, Waitohi, New Zealand, March 31, 1902

Pearse was an enthusiast, and perhaps a turn of the century 'mad scientist' inventor. Certainly his other creations - mostly farm machinery - were far from the mainstream and thus [ also ] didn't get much credit. But he did get a few things right on his flying machine that were amazingly advanced for the time.

Accounts by witnesses of the flight vary, from "50 to 400 yards in length", but it seems most likely that it was around 350 yards long, and ending prematurely when the flying machine landed in a large hedge - 4 metres off the ground ! The aircraft was the first to use proper ailerons, instead of the inferior wing warping system that the Wright's used.

:shrug:

Westbrook
09-27-2019, 12:22 AM
You and me both
Thank you Americans for the invention of A/C's. I could not be able to stand the heat of this country.

renaissance12
09-27-2019, 09:17 AM
This is the first 4004 microprocessor really working..with F.F. marked in the circuit.. only F.F. no other letters..

http://www.roma1.infn.it/rog/pallottino/articoli%20divulgativi/Faggin1.jpg

F.federico F. faggin


But there are 3 poeple with the credit for this invention

Ted Hoff e Stanley Mazor , were not chip designer, .. but beans-counter of the company..

https://www.panorama.it/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/faggin-obama-620x372.jpg


But the really designer was only one.. THE GUY WHO DESIGNED THE MICROPROCESSOR WITH F.F. Letter marked on it....


Faggin told many times that he was obbliged to mark F.F. letter on the first microprocessor ( 4004 - 8008 - 8080 ) in order to prove that ONLY him was the real inventor of the first commercial and working microprocessor..

He didnt trust INTEL at all...


The 4004, the world's first microprocessor, is signed with the initials F.F., for Federico Faggin, its designer. Signing the chip was a spontaneous gesture of proud authorship. It was also an original idea, imitated after him by others.
Federico Faggin signed the 4004 because: • He was the leader of the design/development project of the first microprocessor, and brought it to its successful conclusion.
Faggin did the detailed design work (logic design, circuit design, chip layout, tester design and test program development)

sean
09-28-2019, 12:56 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NyJK4ssCw7s

coolfrenchguy
09-28-2019, 04:07 AM
This is the first 4004 microprocessor really working..with F.F. marked in the circuit.. only F.F. no other letters..

http://www.roma1.infn.it/rog/pallottino/articoli%20divulgativi/Faggin1.jpg

F.federico F. faggin


But there are 3 poeple with the credit for this invention

Ted Hoff e Stanley Mazor , were not chip designer, .. but beans-counter of the company..

https://www.panorama.it/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/faggin-obama-620x372.jpg


But the really designer was only one.. THE GUY WHO DESIGNED THE MICROPROCESSOR WITH F.F. Letter marked on it....


Faggin told many times that he was obbliged to mark F.F. letter on the first microprocessor ( 4004 - 8008 - 8080 ) in order to prove that ONLY him was the real inventor of the first commercial and working microprocessor..

He didnt trust INTEL at all...


The 4004, the world's first microprocessor, is signed with the initials F.F., for Federico Faggin, its designer. Signing the chip was a spontaneous gesture of proud authorship. It was also an original idea, imitated after him by others.
Federico Faggin signed the 4004 because: • He was the leader of the design/development project of the first microprocessor, and brought it to its successful conclusion.
Faggin did the detailed design work (logic design, circuit design, chip layout, tester design and test program development)

for one time i agree with renaissance12 ,i have check the wiki page and yes frederico faggin is the inventor of the first processor of this kind,it's the same case for françois grenelle well fucked too :

François Gernelle, 54, is the father of the first microcomputer, developed in France in 1973. "I could have been Bill Gates»

In his apartment at the Chesnay in the Yvelines, François Gernelle

says, " of course, I could have been Bill Gates. Three years before Steve Jobs in his garage in California, I had done the same thing in a cellar in Châtenay-Malabry (Hauts-de-Seine)."The hair graying, François Gernelle, 54 years old, is watching a funny maroon aluminium. From the inside, he takes out one of the 45 cards with chips, then shows the front of the device with multiple small switches. "My father was a caster and I asked him for a strong case. For the rest, I did everything, helped by two technical agents and a programmer. Then I gave him the name Micral, which means small in slang, " he said. Thus was born the first microcomputer in the history of Computer Science, in France at the very beginning of the winter of 1973. Yet François Gernelle cannot boast of being the inventor without being told: "Are you sure? We thought it was Andre Truong?»

Unfair. On 13 February 1994, François Gernelle watched TF1's television news and heard a report on "the twentieth anniversary of the birth of the microcomputer". He's startled. "When I saw my former boss, André Truong, appearing on screen as the inventor, I said to myself: I must defend myself."André Truong has long played on ambiguity. Managing director of R2e, the company that employed François Gernelle during the creation of the computer, he took the opportunity to claim ownership of the Microal. It took more than four years of legal proceedings, paradoxically in the years (1994-1998) when the sale of computers exploded, for François Gernelle finally obtained, last November, from the Court of appeal of Versailles, the right to write on his CV: "I am the inventor of the microcomputer."Thirty years ago. Gernelle and Truong met in 1968 at Intertechnique, a Yvelines company specializing in computers for medical and nuclear applications. A young electrical engineer, François Gernelle inherited from his uncle Bernard Pouzols, one of the first television manufacturers at Philips, the taste for invention. And, as soon as he discovers the microprocessors, he proposes to the managers of Intertechnique to develop microcomputers. In 1972, he joined Truong, who had just created the company R2E, and there, during an appointment with a head of the Inra (Institut national de recherche agronomique) who was seeking to obtain a very inexpensive system of measuring and calculating the evapotranspiration of soils, François Gernelle had a genius idea: "I propose to make you a calculator for half the expected price."He goes to work, creates the first microcomputer, whose operation will be tested in the corn fields and under the watering holes of the Yvelines. You start to believe. But the bitterness will soon come to a story too beautiful to succeed. Today, despite his legal victory, François Gernelle remains bitter towards his former boss. "Why did neither he nor I make a fortune with my discovery? It is quite simply that one day in 1975 we missed the opportunity to found a monumental start-up," he said. Checkmate.It was in a bar in Los Angeles. Launched on the French market for the past year, the success of the Micral in several professional sectors (Agricultural Credit, Highway Paris-Chambery") had aroused the interest of Americans. "We were having a pot with Honeywell's boss who was offering $ 2 million for the purchase of the microphone and its Prologue software for the United States. For no reason,Truong asked for $ 4 million and Honeywell's boss, not too happy, left the table.»

After Bull bought the company R2E in 1983, François grenelle let Truong set up his own company. Too late, Californians Steve Jobs and Bill Gates have already taken over the market