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Thread: Pictures of the Netherlands

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    We are visiting Rotterdam's Maritime Museum in the Netherlands and taking a tour boat ride in Rotterdam's giant harbor, Europe's busiest port. The museum has a grand display covering 600 years of Dutch naval history, with many up-to-date exhibits on life today in houseboats, and more. The harbor cruise is a great place for views of the stunning ultramodern skyscrapers recently built along the waterfront, continuing into the working shipyard, moving 12 million containers annually.

    You will love the Dutch city of Delft. It is one of the most famous, historical and beautiful towns in the Netherlands, preserved in picture book perfection. It's also a modern city that functions very well for its hundred thousand resident as you're going to see in this comprehensive video guide.

    We're visiting the Dutch city of Gouda in this practical guide to seeing the highlights of Gouda, in Holland, in the Netherlands. Most famous for Gouda cheese, but there are many other attractions to enjoy in this beautiful Dutch city. It has some fine examples of that special Dutch feature of the reflecting canals lined by flowers and pedestrian lanes. But here we've got several of these charming neighborhoods we'll show you in the video, and the important building where the cheese was weighed on the main town square. The Weighing House, or Waag, has for centuries been a central point in town where the all-important cheese was weighed and deals were made. It now contains the Tourist Information Center and the Cheese and Crafts Museum where you can taste and purchase a variety of cheeses. The Markt, or marketplace, is the central plaza in the heart of town, home to countless pubs, restaurants and cozy sidewalk cafes. The exquisitely proportioned Stadhuys, or City Hall, is a gem of late Gothic and early Renaissance architecture, dating from 1449-59. The traditional cheese market takes place in the plaza every Thursday mornings 10 AM till 1230 from April through the end of August. The street alongside the marketplace is one of the busiest in town with lots of shops, and especially the restaurants and bars and cafs usually buzzing with people. One block away, Groote Kerk, or Great Church, also called Saint John Church, was founded in 1485 and rebuilt after a fire in 1562. The round-arched arcades are borne by 36 pillars supporting the lofty barrel-vaulted ceiling of dark wood. It is the longest church in the Netherlands, at 123 meters. Our walking route, starting at the train station and down to that central market square, into the church, then we'll continue along a beautiful canal down to the harbor, and then circling back around in a complete round trip walking tour of the city, and ending up back at the train station. Now we continue along the Westhaven canal. You can easily walk along this splendid canal from the town center, only 600 meters distance - it'll take you about five minutes - down to the historic harbor where you will find clippers, barges and sailing vessels lying majestically alongside each other in the Museum Harbor, and most of these are still lived in. In the Middle Ages, due to its central location, the town offered passage to ships en-route to Amsterdam and Flanders. After the 15th century, Gouda's role in international shipping went into decline. Walking back towards the center from the harbor, you'll see another historic site it's a windmill, very characteristic of the Netherlands. We're taking a circular route through town, walking along yet another beautiful canal, observing all these bicycles going back and forth. You can actually rent a bicycle here if you'd like to peddle around in town or even extend out to some of the surrounding areas. This route to the harbor, and then returning along a few of the less traveled back lanes, gets you off the beaten track. It's an easy stroll that doesn't take much time, and this route can bring you past another few blocks of shopping. Here you can see a benefit of being here when the cheese market is not on you will not see very many other tourists. Then passing along a few residential blocks with their old-fashioned buildings. It's nice to get away from the historic highlights for a while and into a neighborhood that's more for locals. It's quiet and peaceful over here. Then you will come around the bend and find what is perhaps the prettiest of the canal scenes in town along what's called the Turfmarkt. Turf was that peat, or combustible decaying soil that was very important to the old Dutch for cooking and heating their homes, much like in Ireland and elsewhere in the north of Europe. This route takes us back to the center at the marketplace. There's a lovely block behind the market square. We can have a peek at it showing that very special Dutch combination of shop fronts along a pedestrian lane next to a charming little canal circles on the map and next to it is the new market, a modern little shopping mall. Gouda is generally visited as a daytrip from other nearby cities, which are only 20 to 30 minutes away by train. Even all the way to Amsterdam is just 52 minutes. So you can easily visit Gouda for most of the day without spending the night there. Or if you wish to overnight, there are some fine hotels such as a four-star Best Western. The superb Dutch rail system makes it very easy to travel around in this relatively small nation, as you will see in our many other movies about the Netherlands, where we take you to all of the highlights of this wonderful country.

    Were in Leiden, Netherlands. enjoying the pleasures of this beautiful town. It's another one of the great historic cities of the Netherlands, most famous perhaps for the University. It's the oldest university in the Netherlands, founded back in the mid-16th century and so there's a lot of university students here. And it's not as touristic, certainly not nearly as crowded, as a place like Amsterdam, which is only about 1/2 an hour away by train. So it's really a refreshing change to come and visit smaller cities like Leiden. This city has got the canals running through it, as most Dutch cities do. And here it's really quite special, the canals come right through the middle of the old town. There's half a dozen of these very peaceful waterways, especially nice in the morning, busy in the afternoon with lots of people out walking around shopping, eating and drinking. During the program you will get a good look at most of the interesting parts of Leiden. I'll take you on a thorough walking tour, we will go down some of the main lanes, the little back lanes, side lanes. We will see the University and its botanical gardens. We will walk along canals and we'll just show you this town inside and out. Starting in this central part of the city, probably the most attractive and popular place to spend time, where the Old Rhine canal and New Rhine canal come together.

    Leiden is one of the great cities of the Netherlands. In this segment on Leiden were taking you on a canal boat tour. It's a great way to get an overview of the city while sitting and relaxing for an hour and watching the historic buildings glide by. They say Leiden has more canals than any other Dutch city besides Amsterdam. They extend for 28 kilometers within the inner-city and are crossed by 88 bridges, some of which are quite low so you gotta keep your head down when you go beneath them/ It has all of those historic and pictorial charms that you would hope for in a quaint Dutch town -- a city of canals, pedestrian zones, historic buildings and bicycles -- in many ways a typical Dutch town but in others, something quite special. It has the oldest university in the Netherlands with 30,000 students among the 120,000 city population. One of the oldest cities of the country founded about 1000 years ago but with a young population and so many things for the visitor to see and do you could easily spend a couple of days here: drop in on some of its 200 restaurants, 60 bars, thousand shops, many along the pedestrian lanes, explore historic monuments such as this elaborate gatehouse through the medieval wall, one of two surviving gates from the old days, get educated and entertained at one of the half-dozen important museums and stay in one of the 22 hotels offering 3000 rooms. Leiden is located just 40 minutes away from Amsterdam by train, or 20 minutes away from the airport by direct train -- easy to reach yet like many Dutch cities it's overlooked by most of those millions of visitors to Amsterdam who rarely venture beyond that big city. They're missing out on a lot that the Netherlands has to offer as will be showing you in our series. The route that we will be taking in our one hour boat tour goes through some of the most beautiful of the canals of the city in a big loop and then coming back to where we started. I was lucky to take what turned out to be a private tour. Well, nobody else showed up for the departure and Tim very gallantly said okay let's go and took me on a one hour boat ride. He works with a very special boat tour company that relies on 60 volunteers to do most of the driving and guiding. A lot of retirees and other interested residents of Leiden pitch in and help out. The boat company is De Leidse Rederij at https://www.leidserederij.nl/c/


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    The Hague is the second most-visited city in the Netherlands after Amsterdam because it's a city with many attractions and a large pedestrian zone where you can wander about in old historic lanes. Although Amsterdam is the nation's capital, almost all of the government is headquartered here with the parliament, and the prime minister and perhaps most famous as home of the International Court of Justice, a branch of the United Nations. This video is a practical guide for you showing exactly where are the main sites and where you should be walking to catch all of the highlights in your visit. You might think of the Hague as perhaps a modern city, as a government city and therefore maybe not so interesting to visit, but you'll find that it's fascinating. The Hague has got a rich collection of historic buildings, some of them dating back as much as to the 13th century, amazingly, and they have been restored and renovated and kept up to date. The government is located in this complex of very old buildings in the heart of town. And yet there's also a modern side to the city, a modern shopping mall, ultramodern skyscrapers and that wonderful pedestrian zone. So altogether you'll find The Hague has got a lovely variety of kinds of neighborhoods and attractions, historic sites, shopping areas, museums, and just friendly people everywhere, and everywhere, bicycles. The two closest main cities are Delft and Leiden, both of which make a good home base for visiting The Hague on a day trip, only 15 minutes away by train.

    The Mauritshuis is one of the most important art museums in the Netherlands. While it is most famous for one painting, Vermeers Girl With a Pearl Earring, it contains many other great works of art, including two other world-famous masterpieces, Anatomy Lesson by Rembrandt and Paul Potters Bull. Mauritshuis has 800 paintings, mostly from the Dutch Golden Age along with 50 miniatures, 20 sculptures and various drawings and prints, assembled in what is called the Royal Cabinet of Paintings. It has the highest number of masterpieces per square meter in the Netherlands, including paintings by masterpieces by Jan Steen, Frans Hals, Jacob van Ruisdael, Hans Holbein, and others. The Mauritshuis is open every day. On Mondays the museum opens at 13:00 instead of 10:00, and on Thursdays it is open in the evening until 20:00. Tip for those who wish to avoid the busiest time: the Mauritshuis is relatively quiet in the afternoons after 15:00 and on Thursday evenings. See their website for more information: http://www.mauritshuis.nl/en/

    One of the most colorful and exciting days of the year in the Netherlands is Princes Day (Prinsjesdag) which happens in the Hague when the king rides in his golden coach in a major parade through town with lots of marching bands and soldiers on horseback, with traditional colorful outfits and thousands of people cheering as the parade goes by. It's a big outdoor party for people of all ages and kids are especially happy because they get the day off from school. You might be surprised to think that a political speech that's all about the budget for the year would turn out such an enthusiastic crowd, but it's really all about the king and the people's long-standing love and appreciation for the monarchy and they like the razzle-dazzle of the fancy parade. This special day happens just once a year on the third Tuesday in September and begins at the stroke of one when the king, accompanied by other members of the royal household, leaves the palace in his golden carriage, which is only seen publicly on this one day of the year. Heading to parliament to give a speech, accompanied by court dignitaries and a military escort of honor, along with various marching bands and many soldiers marching by in colorful outfits. Were going to show you a lot of the exciting visual highlights and explain to you what's going on during this special day when the government is coming back into session after their summer vacation.
    Note that he erroneously describes the carriage as the Golden Carriage (which is normally used to transport the King to and from Parliament) but this was undergoing maintenance so instead the so-called Glass Carriage was being used.


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    The historic city of Haarlem is one of the most attractive destinations in the Netherlands. We show the main neighborhoods you want to have a look at when you're visiting Haarlem, a real Dutch treat. In the center the market square with the great church towering over, and just below there is a series of pedestrian lanes lined with shops and cafs that are very charming, and there are little side residential lanes here as well. Haarlem is only 15 minutes away from Amsterdam by train, so it makes an easy day-trip, but this small city is so fascinating you might want to spend a night or two to fully enjoy the experience. Many of these brick buildings date back 400 years to the 17th century when Haarlem was at its peak of prosperity. They were homes and workshops and warehouses of the merchants. Today there are a lot of bars and restaurants and then it becomes a shopping street. And this leads us right into perhaps the most charming street in Haarlem and maybe the cutest lane in the country. Kleine Houstraat. You won't get lost here because it's a small district and the streets are rather straight and run at right angles to each other, but there's plenty here to keep you busy for a full day just wandering around. Walk along some of these connecting streets like Anegan, it's almost like a wide shopping mall that joins up three of the other main shopping streets. You'll find the shoppers and workers are friendly and ready to talk. There is frequent train service every 10 minutes between Haarlem and Amsterdam. However if you come on day trip you're probably not going to be getting to the ends of some of the shopping lanes and into the interesting little back streets or to the museums. If you spend a night or two you'll have plenty of time.

    Bringing you into a couple of the really great Haarlem museums, Frans Hals Museum and Teylers Museum, and showing you a few other smaller museums, and into the big church, the Grote Kerk. Frans Hals Museum is one of the top attractions of Haarlem. The museum is located in the old part of town in a building that dates back to 1609 and was originally a retirement home for single old men. Inside are works by many other Haarlem artists of the 17th century. Several stately rooms saved from torn down houses have been partially reconstructed from other Haarlem locations with period furniture and decor. Of course the main attraction are the paintings – 16 of them by Frans Hals, who lived most of his life in Haarlem, between 1616 and 1664, keeping very busy creating many individual portraits, and especially famous for the large group ensembles. In this principle room it seems like you have entered a great banquet hall divided up in different tables. And as you walk in it seems all the guests have turned around to look at you. There are groups of officers and administrators of the hospital, life-sized, some of them seated with faces turned to the spectator as if posing for a photograph, some standing, all splendidly decorated. Hals was the master of showing emotional expression in faces. You really feel as if you know these people, as if you'd met them before. This truth of expression and the jovial character, and the ample rich costumes of the 16th century make it seem like you're really looking at the Holland of 300 years ago – as if you're a watching historical play, not just an art gallery. The solo portraits are equally powerful as the groups. Teylers Museum is the oldest historical museum in the Netherlands and the interior retains that very old-fashioned feeling, like stepping back into 1778 when it was established. Right away upon entering the first room you'll notice these display cases with that original feeling. The room is mostly fossils and bones of old creatures, including some remnants of early human and prehuman, and the first example ever found of the Archaeopteryx, a flying dinosaur. Next we enter a room filled with the variety of scientific instruments including what had been the world's largest electrostatic generator from the 18th century, old telescopes, microscopes, recording devices, telephones, whatnot. A small darkened room showcases luminescent minerals. Then we get to the most famous gallery in the museum. It's the Oval Room that dates back to its founding in the late 1700s with mineral displays in the center and all around it, scientific instruments from the 18th century. The room was designed for research and study with scientific experiments conducted here, and public demonstrations held – in the upper level archives and a library. More museums, then the big church, Grote Kerk. This impressive church has been the heart of the city and its most important landmark for centuries. Located right in the middle of the market square, it was built in the Gothic style of architecture, originally as a Catholic Church between 1370 and 1520 when it was finished.

    It's Saturday morning in the Dutch city of Haarlem, Netherlands and the open market is in full bloom. It's one of the larger and more lively market squares in all of Holland. Market day in a European city is generally a lot of fun. You get a chance to mingle around with the locals then have a look at the produce, and the cheese and the fruits and different clothing items for sale, participating like a resident – and maybe you'll find something good to eat. It's no surprise this big event is at the central market square right in the middle of town next to the big church. When traveling it's not always easy to strike up conversations with the locals but on market day everybody is ready to talk, so by all means have some chats with the vendors. If you don't find anything to eat at the market there are a number of cafs all around the market. There's a beautiful corner bar here – people kicking back watching the parade of people going by, having a drink or having a meal. It's a perfect spot for a break before plunging back into the market. The buildings all around the market square are beautiful and historic. Most of them date back to the 1600s. You've got the old meat market, you've got the weighing house, the City Hall, and the big church, the Grote Kerk, there is an archaeology museum and some former residences of the nobles. Well you can see how much fun this market is but you've got to be here on a Saturday to catch all of this action. So if you can possibly arrange your schedule, if you're staying in Amsterdam and you're around on a weekend, by all means come on over to Haarlem and have a walk around the market and then see the rest of town.

    We are visiting the small and historic Dutch city of Alkmaar. It's in the province of North Holland in the Netherlands about 10 km from the coast and 40 km northwest of Amsterdam. You might not spend the night here, but it makes a lovely daytrip destination with its large number of historic buildings, many shops large and small, lots of Dutch food, lovely canals and one important event. Alkmaar is most famous for its cheese market that happens every week from March until the end of September and we have a complete separate movie about the cheese market that you can see here: https://youtu.be/7edMEdBgy7A In this vbideowe’re going to show you that there is a lot more to see in town besides the cheese market, so by all means spend a few more hours when you get here and walk around in the charming little pedestrian zone, and take a boat ride through the scenic canals passing a lot of very old brick bridges and buildings. The historic center of the old city is relatively small, just about a kilometer across with several main shopping streets for pedestrians so you can easily walk around in a couple of hours and maybe take an hour for a meal and spend at least half a day here, or maybe the full day with the cheese market, then shopping, eating, strolling, and just enjoying the pedestrian atmosphere of this historic old city. It's especially lively on cheese market day with lots of sidewalk stands set up selling crafts and foods, and clothing, all kinds of souvenirs, some big wooden shoes, and of course you'll have a variety of different types of locally produced cheeses. The sidewalk stands are carrying on a long historical tradition because up until the 19th century, most food and agricultural products were traded on street markets. We'll see a lot more of the city coming right up including a canal boat ride. But first a little discussion of how to get here. Most visitors to Alkmaar are staying in Amsterdam and coming up here as a daytrip. Perhaps the best way to get here is by train directly from Amsterdam Central Station -- just takes about 35 to 40 minutes to get up here and you will have the services of the excellent Dutch rail system with departures four times an hour on trains that are clean and smooth and not expensive. Recapping our walk starting at the train station. We have gone through the middle of the old city and now have reached the center of the shopping and cultural area. And here we've got sidestreets as well that are fascinating for strolling along and doing some more shopping. These blocks in the city center preserve that 17th-century pattern of canals and narrow streets with many historic buildings we have reached the most beautiful part of Alkmaar. Here are all of the elements of a traditional Dutch city come together what you would hope to find when you visit Holland old brick buildings along the canal Terrace restaurant with a view of the passing parade of people with shops and benches and flowerpots in the street lamps. You might consider this the center of town with this impressive bridge in front of the Weigh House and leading across the canal to a lovely little shopping district with more of these pedestrian lanes with little boutiques tucked away. You could wander for hours. This neighborhood in front of the Weigh House is action central for all the boats going through the town. Here you'll find several different choices for joining up with a boat tour. Some of them are just casual friends getting together, others are organized by various companies in town.

    Alkmaar in the Netherlands has the world’s biggest, most-visited and best cheese market, There is no prettier or more characteristic Dutch sight than this cheese market, with these guys in white running around carrying these big loads of cheese back and forth. What is going on? You are about to find out. For centuries the cheese market has been important for the city of Alkmaar and in recent years it has developed into one of the leading visitor attractions in the country. It's an easy day trip from Amsterdam, just about 40 minutes away by train or by guided tour on a bus. Alkmaar is much more than just cheese. It's a typical small Dutch city which means it has many historic, well-preserved buildings and beautiful canals lots of shops, restaurants, cafs and pedestrian lanes to stroll on. We will see more of the town in a different segment but for now we are focusing attention on the wonderful cheese market. Almost 700 years ago, Alkmaar was already a cheese town. In 1365 the city was granted weighing rights and got their first cheese scale -- in 1612 this number of scales increased to four. Over time, the cheese market frequently needed more space. Markets were the economic engine in those days, so houses were sometimes demolished to increase market space. Over the course of two centuries, it was enlarged no fewer than eight times before reaching its current dimensions. Alkmaar's status as the cheese capital has become increasingly famous over the years and the cheese market became ever more popular, and now it’s the biggest in the country. In the past, most cheese was transported by boat or horse. And this centuries-old tradition has survived in part to this very day. During every market, cheese laden boats sail from the North Holland Canal to the square, just as they did in the past. The market is on every Friday from the end of March through September and during July and August it also functions on Tuesday evenings. The cheese workers are members of the cheese guild, like a union, and they’re divided up into teams as shown by their hat colors, blue, yellow, red and green. The overall manager is called the Cheese Father and he wears an orange hat. We had a chance to speak with an official of the group who helped describe the situation for us My position, is I was the Cheese Father of this guild for many years and now I am the tourist guide. We’ll hear more from Kees Koopman during the program. Right before 10.00 AM everyone waits for the market to get under way as the lady speaker welcomes visitors in as many languages as possible. She tells the general public about what they’re about to see at the market. In a few minutes the bell is ringing and the market is starting. At 10 am the bell rings (bell sound). It’s the sign indicating the start of the cheese market. The ringing of the bell is often done by a visitor to the market, at the invitation of the council of Alkmaar. For example it might be a famous Dutch person from sports or TV, or a foreign ambassador. As soon as the market opens, the samplers and traders go to work. Inspecting cheese is more than just looking at its exterior. Cheese is knocked on and a special cheese scoop is used to obtain a piece, which is then crumbled between the fingers and smelled. And, naturally, it is tasted to assess the relation between taste, and the percentages of fat and moisture. Many lucky people in the audience get a free taste and some of them even get to push that coring tool into the cheese, it's something like an apple corer and pull out a sample for themselves It will come as no surprise that everybody will have a chance to purchase as much cheese as they want from the vendors who are surrounding the cheese market area — you'll see more of that coming right up. Cheese is transported on the wooden barrow hanging between two cheese carriers, holding about 8 Gouda cheeses, each of them weighing 13,5 kilos. Carrying a heavy barrow, with a total weight of about 130 kilos. Walking with that heavy barrow or stretcher appears much easier than it seems. But there is a special technique. In order to facilitate the walking rhythm and to prevent the stretcher from hitting their legs, the men walk 'out of step' in the strange looking cheese bearers' trot. This keeps the stretcher movement to a minimum, ensuring the barrow hangs as still as possible. [Music plays] We work you see with four groups, you see four different colors. Each group is seven people. There are six carriers and the seventh works on the scale – that is a very important man because in the early days, he counts the money from the buyers, the ones who have trade, for each kilo that we carry. We've got the two big factories here in the north of the Netherlands and they make millions of kilos of cheese each year, and it goes around the world.




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    In the dunes near Schoorl:











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    Starting out at the Rotterdam train station, which is where you would probably be arriving when you come to Rotterdam, in the Netherlands. There's an excellent Tourist Information counter here where you can get a lot of good advice about the main sites you want to see in your visit. The tram station out front is quite active with eight different tramlines running through it. You'll quickly reach anywhere in town from the central station. There are very modern buildings in Rotterdam, and they are well planned with apartments in the downtown area and some parks and you've got the idyllic waterfront with the boat traffic and the apartments around it. There is a culture history museum. There's an excellent art museum. And that's where we are heading soon in the program, show you a couple of fine museums. First we walk along Westersingel canal, with parks along the banks of the canal, you've got some ducks quacking by and also it's an outdoor sculpture garden with fountains and benches and a wide promenade that makes for very easy and pleasant walking. Then we visit a great museum, Boymans van Beuningen, which is one of the major art museums in the Netherlands, an amazing collection that spans from the Renaissance and earlier right up through modern design. Then, the museum we are heading for next is all about people and culture history called the World Museum and English, or in Dutch, the name is Wereldmuseum. The city population is 640,000 making it second largest after Amsterdam, but if you include the greater metropolitan area extending to the Hague, population totals 2.5 million. Rotterdam has got 38 skyscrapers and 352 high-rises with many more skyscrapers coming up soon. There are nine different tramlines operating in Rotterdam, making this a very convenient way to get around, and they are thoroughly modernized. Although, in their beginnings, they were founded in 1878 as horse-drawn trams. In 1904 the first electric trams began service and gradually the horse wagons were phased out. By 1906 there was already five electric tramlines operating and then four more lines began in the next four years. The last horse cars stopped running by 1925. The maximum extent of Rotterdam's tramway network was 25 lines, which was reached in 1930. Throughout the main cities of Europe, there has been a similar history of trams developing from horse to electric, and then declining, and in recent years, a resurgence in popularity of the system. Currently 40 different Dutch cities have operating tram systems, but only two have metros, Rotterdam and Amsterdam.

    Van verkeersader vol auto's naar een groene boulevard voor voetgangers en fietsers. De Coolsingel in Rotterdam ondergaat een opknapbeurt van 60 miljoen euro die bijna drie jaar gaat duren. Op de dag na de marathon klinkt direct het startschot voor het begin van de werkzaamheden. "Na drie jaar van plannen tekenen en vergaderen, gaat nu de schop erin. En dat is het heerlijkste moment. Eindelijk gaan we de bouwkeet in." zegt Adriaan Geuze van bureau West8. De architect van de nieuwe Coolsingel kijkt uit naar de bouwfase. Vanaf maandag 9 april is de Coolsingel deels afgesloten. De werkzaamheden moeten tot maart 2021 gaan duren. Alles gaat op de schop: ondergronds en bovengronds tot en met de winkelpuien. "Het grote nieuws is dat de voetganger de helft van de Coolsingel krijgt. Je hoeft straks niet meer op het verkeer te letten." De huidige Coolsingel is een ontwerp uit de jaren zestig waarin het verkeer domineert. Er zijn twee rijbanen voor auto's van zuid naar noord, er is een brede middenberm voor het tramverkeer en daarnaast twee rijbanen van noord naar zuid. Architect Geuze noemt het een vierbaansweg zonder vangrails.Dat verandert totaal. De autorijbanen worden teruggebracht van vier naar twee. Straks blijven alleen de twee rijbanen van zuid naar noord over en automobilisten zullen die twee kanten op gaan delen. Dat betekent dat de tweebaansweg van het Hofplein naar het Churchillplein verdwijnt en voetgangers- en fietsersgebied wordt. Adriaan Geuze:"Hier kunnen we straks flaneren langs bomen, kiosken en op terrassen en kan je koninklijk over de Coolsingel fietsen". Speciale aandacht is er voor de bestrating en de verlichting. "We hebben voor de Coolsingel specifieke lantaarnpalen ontworpen waarbij we ons hebben laten inspireren door de art deco-verlichting op het bordes van het stadhuis uit de jaren twintig". Ook de tegels passen qua kleur en stijl goed bij de oudere gebouwen van de Coolsingel, zoals het oude postgebouw, het stadhuis, de Bijenkorf en het Hotel Atlanta. In de lente van 2021 moeten de werkzaamheden aan de Coolsingel zijn afgerond. "Ook ik vind dat lang duren en kan nauwelijks wachten", zegt architect Geuze. Vooral het werk ondergronds en het aanleggen van extra nooduitgangen voor de metro zijn complex en vergen veel tijd.
    Last edited by The Lawspeaker; 08-30-2019 at 11:44 PM.


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    the streets of Amsterdam from the tram (cabview)

    https://youtu.be/hUUpxdqNg0M

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    Maastricht is a unique city in Netherlands because it’s at the southernmost point of the country, way down by Belgium, by Germany, close to France even, and so the culture down here is little bit different than you find in the north and the west of the Netherlands. It’s a very cosmopolitan city. It’s got that typical pedestrians zone with many little lanes just for people, no cars allowed, a lot of restaurants and cafs, there is the historic sites, the churches, there’s an old fortification and medieval walls around part of the city, and there’s a variety of other touring activities. The main pedestrian street is Grote Staat. It goes right to the heart of Maastricht and it’s all for pedestrian, it's bicycles, people walking their dog, people out shopping. This evening it's about 7 PM we're getting twilight already. It's a Thursday, shops are open until nine on Thursdays, otherwise generally closing at 6 PM. So Thursday night is a great time to be out walking. And this is September, late September, the weather is unusually warm. For this whole month it’s been just perfect so that might be a the time for you to consider coming to visit the Netherlands. It's an area for pedestrians and bicycles, for baby carriages, for people walking their dogs, but no cars loud here in this central shopping area of historic Maastricht. It’s a pretty extensive zone that goes for dozens of blocks and with two main squares that are connected by the lovely pedestrian lanes. Naturally most of the shops are clothing stores but there’s a variety of other kind, there is the art galleries, sundries, there are cafs, there are always the bakeries, and the bar on the corner, there’s a few modern shopping malls tucked away in here as well too, beautiful Maastricht.


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    More Leiden:


    We are taking another look at Leiden, one of the most beautiful towns in the Netherlands. Wandering along the canals enjoying the reflections, heading for the shopping streets and some historic monuments and museums. This is kind of like a video postcard rack where we're going to look at some of the buildings, we will see the dogs sitting out on the sidewalk and people at their terrace tables, or just out for a stroll in the historic neighborhoods. Sure there are lots of monuments and important sites that you'll want to see, but one of the joys and being in a place like Leiden is just simply taking a walk and watching the bicycles. At the end of this short movie we will take you inside two of the main museums, covering history and culture. We will also have a look inside the modern train station, which is the transportation heart of the city.


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    Utrecht is one special city in the Netherlands with a unique atmosphere created by terrace restaurants and promenades right at water level along the canals, producing a delightful ambience in a historic setting, and yet also lined with modern shops and restaurants and bars. It's this wonderful split-level setting with pedestrian streets above and down below by the canals you've got the restaurants on their terraces, really quite special. And there are many other delightful aspects to the city of Utrecht. It's the fourth largest city in the Netherlands, and it's got the oldest university, and they claim the second largest collection of historic medieval buildings, second only to Amsterdam. Standing high above it all is the tallest church tower in the country, then add to the mix typical Dutch ingredients of friendly people with a relaxed tolerant attitude, always ranked high in global indexes of happiness and quality of life bicycles zooming by, great beer, wonderful food, and a compact pedestrian historic zone riddled with picturesque canals. This is a place you would love to visit as we will show you in this detailed travel guide. http://tourvideos.com/

    Utrecht in the Netherlands is one of the most beautiful places you'll ever see, famous for its dining terraces that are right at the level of the water in the main canal, with the city streets and shops up above. Of course there are lots of bicycles and historic brick buildings in that typical Dutch style. At the same time it's a modern city with a very high standard of living, one of the largest universities in the country and plenty of up-to-date shops set in this marvelous historical atmosphere. There are wonderful canals that go through the middle of town like you find in many Dutch cities and here the canals are especially interesting because they're split-level, you have the street level up above and the terrace and water level down below with the sidewalk restaurants and the cellar barrel-vaulted basement, so it is really quite an interesting combination. We are very fortunate to be taking a walk through the old town with one of the very best of the local guides, Jitte Roosendaal, and he's going to take us on a walking tour describing the setting, the people, the buildings and some of the history. And at the end of the program will have a look at Utrecht by night, with their special lighting and lively restaurants by the canal. You'll discover that Utrecht is a magical place that you're going to love. We will also take you on a boat ride through the canals of the historic center and we will look inside several of the important museums, covering history, art and culture with some interactive hands-on activities, at Centraal Museum, Utrecht University Museum and Museum Catharijneconvent. The historic center is small enough that you could just wander around on your own without any particular plan but it does help to have some information, especially from a guide like Jitte who's a graduate of the local University specializing in cultural geography. Its a goo city to live in because it's not that big, and it has a nice atmosphere a lot of history and when you need something well you can buy it, it's everywhere. And Utrecht is also the heart of the country so its important it's, it's lots of connections motorways, train stations and so on. So from here, it's easy to reach every part of the country. Consider how to handle your visit to Utrecht. Do you come here as a day trip from someplace else, or do you come and spend at least one night, maybe two at a hotel in Utrecht? It's up to you, but as you see, there is much to enjoy in this wonderful city, and it could be done, either way. Let's consider the possibilities. If you come as a daytrip you really want to spend the day and the evening, as you see here with this beautiful lighting, and have dinner at one of these outdoor restaurants. It looks so nice. And then you could take a late train back to your home city, perhaps Amsterdam, it's just 1/2 an hour away on the fast train schedule. Or better yet, stay a night or two in Utrecht. That way after dinner you can just take a leisurely stroll, you're relaxing, back to your hotel, spend the night. The trade-off is you have to deal with your suitcases, moving from one city to the next is never a lot of fun. But it's easy enough here, the distances are short and it's an easy walk from the train station into the Old Town with many hotels available. So do yourself a favor and give Utrecht a couple of days. One of the Netherland's best destinations.


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    Slightly edited raw footage from travel in Amsterdam. Places visited include down town, INK hotel, Muiderslot castle, Nieuwendijk shopping street, Anne Frank museum, Zaanse Schools. #docufeel [email protected]


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