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Thread: Traces of forgotten historical events in mountain communities in Central Italy: A genetic insight

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    Default Traces of forgotten historical events in mountain communities in Central Italy: A genetic insight

    Traces of forgotten historical events in mountain communities in Central Italy: A genetic insight.

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...22677/suppinfo


    Cappadocia (n = 54)
    5.6% E1b1b
    35.2% I1
    3.7% J1
    14.8% J2
    31.5% R1b
    9.3% T



    Filettino (n = 17)
    11.8% G2a
    23.5% I1
    11.8% I2
    5.9% J2
    35.3% R1b
    11.8% T


    Jenne (n = 65)
    29.2% E1b1b
    33.8% G2a
    3.1% J1
    18.5% J2
    9.2% Q
    1.5% R1b
    4.6% T


    Piglio (n = 47)
    21.3% E1b1b
    10.6% G2a
    6.4% I1
    2.1% I2
    6.4% J1
    17.0% J2
    36.2% R1b


    Saracinesco (n = 13)
    30.8% E1b1b
    7.7% I2
    7.7% J2
    46.1% R1b
    7.7% T



    Trevi nel Lazio (n = 23)
    13.0% E1b1b
    8.7% G2a
    8.7% I1
    4.3% I2
    4.3% J1
    30.4% J2
    13.0% R1a
    17.4% R1b


    Vallepietra (n = 18)
    16.7% E1b1b
    27.8% I1
    11.1% J2
    33.3% R1b
    11.1% T



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    I found it a bit off that E1b1b is the second most common haplogroup in central Italy.

    "Haplogroup E1b1b (formerly known as E3b) represents the last major direct migration from Africa into Europe. It is believed to havefirst appeared in the Horn of Africa approximately 26,000 years ago and dispersed to North Africa and the Near East during the latePaleolithic and Mesolithic periods. E1b1b lineages are closely linked to the diffusion of Afro-Asiatic languages"

    "The highest genetic diversity of haplogroup E1b1b is observed in Northeast Africa, especially in Ethiopia and Somalia, which alsohave the monopoly of older and rarer branches like M281, V6 or V92. Ethiopians and Somalians belong mostly to the V22 and V32(downstream of V12) subclades, but possess also a minority of M81, M123 and V42 subclades. Among the main subclades of E1b1b only V13 and V65 are absent from the Horn of Africa, and probably originated in northern Africa (V65) or the southern Levant(V13)."

    "It is still unclear when haplogroup E first entered Europe. The earliest known prehistoric sample to date is an E-V13 from Cataloniadating from 5000 BCE. So we know for sure that E1b1b was present in southern Europe at least since the Early Neolithic.Nonetheless, the possibility of other migrations of E1b1b to southern Europe during the Mesolithic or Late Palaeolithic cannot beruled out. It is highly probable that the E-M78 subclade, found at relatively high frequencies in Mediterranean Africa, especially inEgypt (45% of the population) migrated to southern Europe before Neolithic herders from the Cardium Pottery culture arrived.One might wonder why E1b1b is more common in the southern Balkans (Greece included) and southern Italy than anywhere in theMiddle East, except in Egypt. What's more, the dominant form of E1b1b in Southeast Europe is E-V13, a subclade absent from theHorn of Africa and only present at low frequencies in North Africa (peaking in Lybia), the Levant and western Anatolia.It has usually been assumed among academics that E-V13 and other E1b1b lineages came to the Balkans from the southernLevant via Anatolia during the Neolithic, and that the high frequency of E-V13 was caused by a founder effect among the colonisers.This theory has it that E1b1b people were associated with the development of Neolithic lifestyle and the advent of agriculture in theFertile Crescent and its earliest diffusion to Southeast Europe (Thessalian Neolithic) and Mediterranean Europe (Cardium Potteryculture). The only concrete evidence for this at the moment is the presence of the E-V13 subclade, commonest in the southernBalkans today, at a 7000-year old Neolithic site in north-east Spain, which was tested by Lacan et al (2011). However, since E1b1b has not been found in any of the various Neolithic sites from the Balkans and Central Europe, it is more likely that the CatalanE-V13 individual was descended from Mediterranean Mesolithic hunter-gatherers.This alternate hypothesis is that E-V13 migrated directly from North Africa to southern Europe, crossing the Mediterranean fromTunisia to Sicily, then to Italy and to the southern Balkans. This scenario would explain why E-V13 reaches its peak frequency juston the opposite side of the Strait of Otranto from Italy, i.e. in Albania (+ Kosovo) and Thessaly. During the Ice Age, Malta, Sicily and mainland Italy formed a single land mass and the coast of North Africa was approximately half the distance it was today, making Sicily visible from Tunisia. Considering that Homo sapiens managed to get all the way to Australiaby boat between 70,000 and 40,000 years ago, crossing the Strait of Sicily, perhaps via the small island of Pantelleria halfway,would have posed no major problem. In fact, it is almost certain that humans crossed that strait numerous times during the Stone Age.Other subclades of E-M78 also present in North Africa and Europe today, like V12, V22 and V65, could also have crossed alongsideV13. It is perhaps only due to a founder effect that V13 became considerably more common than other subclades in Europe,especially in the Balkans and eastern Europe. The greatest diversity of E-M78 subclades in Europe is actually found in Iberia, Italyand France, and not in the Balkans (where nearly all E1b1b are V13)"
    http://www.academia.edu/6089365/Orig...p_E1b1b_Y-DNA_

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gilgamesh900 View Post
    I found it a bit off that E1b1b is the second most common haplogroup in central Italy.

    "Haplogroup E1b1b (formerly known as E3b) represents the last major direct migration from Africa into Europe. It is believed to havefirst appeared in the Horn of Africa approximately 26,000 years ago and dispersed to North Africa and the Near East during the latePaleolithic and Mesolithic periods. E1b1b lineages are closely linked to the diffusion of Afro-Asiatic languages"

    "The highest genetic diversity of haplogroup E1b1b is observed in Northeast Africa, especially in Ethiopia and Somalia, which alsohave the monopoly of older and rarer branches like M281, V6 or V92. Ethiopians and Somalians belong mostly to the V22 and V32(downstream of V12) subclades, but possess also a minority of M81, M123 and V42 subclades. Among the main subclades of E1b1b only V13 and V65 are absent from the Horn of Africa, and probably originated in northern Africa (V65) or the southern Levant(V13)."

    "It is still unclear when haplogroup E first entered Europe. The earliest known prehistoric sample to date is an E-V13 from Cataloniadating from 5000 BCE. So we know for sure that E1b1b was present in southern Europe at least since the Early Neolithic.Nonetheless, the possibility of other migrations of E1b1b to southern Europe during the Mesolithic or Late Palaeolithic cannot beruled out. It is highly probable that the E-M78 subclade, found at relatively high frequencies in Mediterranean Africa, especially inEgypt (45% of the population) migrated to southern Europe before Neolithic herders from the Cardium Pottery culture arrived.One might wonder why E1b1b is more common in the southern Balkans (Greece included) and southern Italy than anywhere in theMiddle East, except in Egypt. What's more, the dominant form of E1b1b in Southeast Europe is E-V13, a subclade absent from theHorn of Africa and only present at low frequencies in North Africa (peaking in Lybia), the Levant and western Anatolia.It has usually been assumed among academics that E-V13 and other E1b1b lineages came to the Balkans from the southernLevant via Anatolia during the Neolithic, and that the high frequency of E-V13 was caused by a founder effect among the colonisers.This theory has it that E1b1b people were associated with the development of Neolithic lifestyle and the advent of agriculture in theFertile Crescent and its earliest diffusion to Southeast Europe (Thessalian Neolithic) and Mediterranean Europe (Cardium Potteryculture). The only concrete evidence for this at the moment is the presence of the E-V13 subclade, commonest in the southernBalkans today, at a 7000-year old Neolithic site in north-east Spain, which was tested by Lacan et al (2011). However, since E1b1b has not been found in any of the various Neolithic sites from the Balkans and Central Europe, it is more likely that the CatalanE-V13 individual was descended from Mediterranean Mesolithic hunter-gatherers.This alternate hypothesis is that E-V13 migrated directly from North Africa to southern Europe, crossing the Mediterranean fromTunisia to Sicily, then to Italy and to the southern Balkans. This scenario would explain why E-V13 reaches its peak frequency juston the opposite side of the Strait of Otranto from Italy, i.e. in Albania (+ Kosovo) and Thessaly. During the Ice Age, Malta, Sicily and mainland Italy formed a single land mass and the coast of North Africa was approximately half the distance it was today, making Sicily visible from Tunisia. Considering that Homo sapiens managed to get all the way to Australiaby boat between 70,000 and 40,000 years ago, crossing the Strait of Sicily, perhaps via the small island of Pantelleria halfway,would have posed no major problem. In fact, it is almost certain that humans crossed that strait numerous times during the Stone Age.Other subclades of E-M78 also present in North Africa and Europe today, like V12, V22 and V65, could also have crossed alongsideV13. It is perhaps only due to a founder effect that V13 became considerably more common than other subclades in Europe,especially in the Balkans and eastern Europe. The greatest diversity of E-M78 subclades in Europe is actually found in Iberia, Italyand France, and not in the Balkans (where nearly all E1b1b are V13)"
    http://www.academia.edu/6089365/Orig...p_E1b1b_Y-DNA_

    They're isolated, they probably maintained the pre-R1b arrival genetics, if you look the G2a is very high.
    E is quite common in Italy especially V13.
    in the other hands Iberia have more M81.



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    My ydna is from Trevi and I'm E-V13. I would really like to understand the history of this haplogroup in those mountains. Did it arrive with indoeuropeans after being assimilated in the balkans, or is it neolithic?


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