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Thread: Dragon Symbolism in Worldwide Cultures

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    Default Dragon Symbolism in Worldwide Cultures

    Dragon Symbolism in Worldwide Cultures
    By Yona Williams 4/14/10


    The dragon is a popular creature in mythology, art and literature that is often associated to China, but other cultures in the world have looked at the dragon as a significant symbol. In this article, you will learn how the dragon fit in with the tales and associations of countries, such as Bhutan and Japan.

    Bhutenese Mythology

    The Druk (which translates into 'Thunder Dragon') in Bhutenese mythology, is also a part of the national symbol in the country. On the flag, you can see the dragon holding jewels, which symbolizes wealth.

    The Golden Dragon Dance in Japan

    Each year, the Japanese dragon dance is performed at Senso-ji a Buddhist temple located in Asakusa. Dancers execute a routine comprised of twists and turns, as they move about the temple grounds. Eventually, they spill into the streets. A legend tells the tale of the Senso Temple, which was founded in 628, as being the handiwork of two fishermen. The two men supposedly found a fold statuette of Kannon in the Sumida River. This was supposed to be around the same time that dragons had found their way to the heavens. The Golden Dragon Dance is meant to rejoice in the founding of the temple. It is said to give the people good luck and success.

    The Dragon to the Vietnamese



    The dragon represented a handful of different things to the Vietnamese people. They were bringers of rain and played an important role in agriculture. They also signify the emperor, prosperity, and the power of the country. Similar to Chinese dragon symbolism, the Vietnamese see the dragon as a symbol for yang, which offers connections to life, existing, and growth. The visual aspects of the Vietnamese dragon were determined by the particular dynasty in effect at the time. Different characteristics started to appear, including wings, arms, and horns.

    For example, the dragon associated with the Tran Dynasty (12251400) possessed horns and arms something previous creatures did not. This version was significant to people practicing martial arts because it was believed that this particular dragon was a descendant of a Mandarin warrior. It probably gave them a sense of empowerment and strength as they went up against Mongol invaders, who they engaged in battle with during this time period.

    Portuguese Dragon Mythology

    In Portuguese myths, a female dragon called the coca is associated with a tale that the creature battled Saint George on the Corpus Christi holiday. This fight possesses symbolic meaning. When the coca is successful in besting Saint George, crops will turn bad and the region experiences famine and death. However, when Saint George defeats the coca, he cuts off the tongue and ears of the dragon and crops will see prosperity.

    The dragon appears in many different European myths and legends. A few other examples include:

    Italy: A famous dragon of Italian folklore is Thyrus, who dates back to the Middle Ages.

    Catalonia: The Catalan dragon (also referred to as a 'drac') usually has two legs and is sometimes illustrated with a pair of wings.

    Britain: The dragon is popular in Wales, as its national flag incorporates a red dragon.

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    I have come to think that the dragon symbolizes unrestrained spirituality!
    This is why the priests of dogma have vilified its form.

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    It usually has a pair of legs here, yes, lol, but wings? Hmmm, not really.

    Not only Portugal associates it with St. George, we also do. Here the legend says that the dragon was given a young maiden every year, until the year it was the king's daughter's turn. Saint George slayed the dragon and a rose was formed from the blood, which he gave to the princess. That's why every April 23rd we give a rose to the women we love, girlfriends, mothers, daughters, wives, mistresses ...

    < La Catalogne peut se passer de l'univers entier, et ses voisins ne peuvent se passer d'elle. > Voltaire

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bloodeagle View Post
    I have come to think that the dragon symbolizes unrestrained spirituality!
    This is why the priests of dogma have vilified its form.
    It surely has much to do with the Book of Revelation and the position of the 'dragon' as the enemy of the divine:

    And there was seen another sign in heaven: and behold a great red dragon, having seven heads, and ten horns: and on his head seven diadems: And his tail drew the third part of the stars of heaven, and cast them to the earth: and the dragon stood before the woman who was ready to be delivered; that, when she should be delivered, he might devour her son. And she brought forth a man child, who was to rule all nations with an iron rod: and her son was taken up to God, and to his throne.

    The use of the dragon itself in the text is probably due to the association of dragons with serpents (i.e. the serpent: "And he laid hold on the dragon, the old serpent, which is the devil and Satan, and bound him for a thousand years." - Rev. 20:2).

    Anyway, some on here may have some knowledge of the white dragon-red dragon symbolism in the legend of Merlin:

    Before the sacrifice could take place, Merlin used his great visionary powers and attributed the structural problem to a subterranean pool in which lived a red and a white dragon. The meaning of this, according to Merlin, was that the red dragon represented the Britons, and the white dragon, the Saxons. The dragons fought, with the white dragon having the best of it, at first, but then the red dragon drove the white one back. The meaning was clear. Merlin prophesied that Vortigern would be slain and followed on the throne by Ambrosius Aurelianus, then Uther, then a greater leader, Arthur. It would fall to him to push the Saxons back.

    ...

    "A king who is blessed will fit out a navy and will be reckoned the twelfth in the court among the saints. The realm shall be deserted in the most pitiful way, and the harvest threshing floors will be overgrown once more by forests rich in fruit. Once again the White Dragon shall rise up and will invite over a daughter of Germany. Our little garden will be stocked again with foreign seed, and the Red Dragon will pine away at the far end of the pool. After that the German Worm shall be crowned, and the Prince of brass will be buried."

    ...

    "The seed of the White Dragon shall be rooted up from our little gardens and what is left of its progeny shall be decimated. They shall bear the yoke of perpetual slavery, and they will wound their own mother with their spades and ploughshares. Two more Dragons shall follow, one of which shall be killed by the sting of envy, but the second will return under the cover of authority."

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    One of my profs in university theorized that dragons and other such supernatural or mythical beings in European folklore and literature were symbolic of real problems: political upheaval, corruption, famine, greed, or other things that affected the whole community in general.

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    The Celts here in Britain used Dragon shaped horns with cavalry units, the Bronze Dragon horns had a flap at the mouth and when on horseback at speed the horn sounded, hence we get the word Dragoon (cavalry unit)
    As the last of the British celts were forced out of the Scottish lowlands by the Irish Scotti tribes, the Celts/Welsh settled in north Wales, in my opinion they used the Dragon emblem on their flag from the revered and sacred Dragon horn.

    Have you noticed that if you rearrange the letters in illegal immigrants, and add just a few more letters, it spells, Go home you free-loading, benefit-grabbing, resource-sucking, baby-making, non-English-speaking ********* and take those other hairy-faced, sandal-wearing, bomb-making, camel-riding, goat-f*****g raghead c***s with you.?

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    nuff said



    Patagonian Welsh flag


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    Quote Originally Posted by Germanicus View Post
    The Celts here in Britain used Dragon shaped horns with cavalry units, the Bronze Dragon horns had a flap at the mouth and when on horseback at speed the horn sounded, hence we get the word Dragoon (cavalry unit)
    As the last of the British celts were forced out of the Scottish lowlands by the Irish Scotti tribes, the Celts/Welsh settled in north Wales, in my opinion they used the Dragon emblem on their flag from the revered and sacred Dragon horn.

    I think that's supposed to be a boar's head? the Carnyx it's called. Seen here on the Gundestrup cauldron found in Denmark

    Last edited by Graham; 02-16-2011 at 12:30 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Graham View Post
    I think that's supposed to be a boar's head? the Carnyx it's called.


    You indeed are right however the celts used a cavalry Dragon horn but i cannot find a picture of it.
    Have you noticed that if you rearrange the letters in illegal immigrants, and add just a few more letters, it spells, Go home you free-loading, benefit-grabbing, resource-sucking, baby-making, non-English-speaking ********* and take those other hairy-faced, sandal-wearing, bomb-making, camel-riding, goat-f*****g raghead c***s with you.?

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    This is one of the statues depicting mythological wights that adorn our property.

    The dragon possesses four legs and a pair of wings. The wyvern has two legs and a pair of wings.


    Stop the hate, separate!

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